Analog VLSI systems - UPBcsit-sun.pub.ro/courses/vlsi/VLSI_Darmstad/ VLSI systems 21.1 Analog Signal Processing Typical signal processing applications require mixed analog/digital

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  • Analog Signal Processing

    Chapter 21

    Analog VLSI systems

    21.1 Analog Signal Processing

    Typical signal processing applications require mixed analog/digital implementations. Thesemainly consist of

    Preprocessing of the signals, e.g. filtering and A/D conversion

    Digital signal processing, e.g. digital filtering, calculation of FFT

    Postprocessing, e.g. D/A conversion

    as shown in Fig.21.1

    The aim of development is to integrate all these functions on a single chip.

    Figure 21.1: Block diagram of a typical signal processing system

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-1Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog Signal Processing

    21.1.1 Signal Bandwidths in Analog VLSI

    Figure 21.2: Bandwidths of signals used in signal processing applications

    Figure 21.3: Signal bandwidths that can be processed by present day (1989)technologies

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-2Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog Signal Processing

    21.1.2 A/D and D/A Conversion in Signal Processing Systems

    Fig. 21.4 illustrates how analog-to-digital (A/D) and digital-to-analog (D/A) converters areused in data systems. In general, an A/D conversion process will convert a sampled andheld analog signal to a digital word that is a representative of the analog signal. The D/Aconversion process is essentially the inverse of the A/D process. Digital words are applied tothe input of the D/A converter to create from a reference voltage an analog output signal thatis a representative of the digital word.

    Figure 21.4: Converters in signal processing systems: (a) A/D, (b) D/A

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-3Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Digital-To-Analog Converters

    21.2 Digital-To-Analog Converters

    Input to D/A converters are

    (a) a digital word of N bits (b1, b2, b3, . . . , bN )

    (b) a reference Voltage Vref

    The output voltage can be expressed as

    VOUT = KVrefD (21.1)

    where K is a scaling factor and D is given as

    D =b121

    +b222

    +b323

    + . . .+bN2N

    (21.2)

    Thus, the output of a D/A converter can be expressed by

    VOUT = KVrefNi=1

    bi2i (21.3)

    Figure 21.5: (a) Conceptual block diagram of a D/A converter, (b) ClockedD/A converter

    In most cases, the digital input of the D/A converter is synchronously clocked. It is thereforenecessary to provide a latch to hold the word for conversion and a sample-and-hold circuit atthe output, as shown in Fig. 21.5(b).

    The basic architecture of the D/A converter without an output sample-and-hold circuit isshown in Fig. 21.7. Fig. 21.8 shows the ideal input-output characteristics for such a D/Aconverter.

    21.2.1 Current Scaling D/A Converters

    The output Voltage of a current-scaling D/A converter as shown in Fig. 21.9 can be expressedas

    Vout = R

    2I0 =

    R

    2

    (b1R

    +b22R

    +b34R

    + . . .+bN

    2N1R

    )Vref (21.4)

    = Vref (b121 + b222 + b323 + . . .+ bN2N ) (21.5)

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-4Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Digital-To-Analog Converters

    Figure 21.6: (a) Sample-and-hold circuit, (b) Waveforms illustrating the op-eration of the sample-and-hold circuit

    Figure 21.7: Block diagram of a D/A converter

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-5Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Digital-To-Analog Converters

    Figure 21.8: Ideal input-output characteristics for a 3-bit D/A converter

    The major disadvantage of this approach is the large ratio of component values. For example,the ratio of the resistor for the MSB to the resistor for the LSB is given by

    RMSBRLSB

    =1

    2N1(21.6)

    For a 8-bit converter, this gives a ratio of 1/128.

    An alternative to this approach is the use of a R-2R ladder as shown in Fig. 21.10. Using thefact that the resistance to the right of any of the vertical 2R resistors is 2R, we see that thecurrents I1, I2, I3, . . . , IN are binary-weighted and given as

    I1 = 2I2 = 4I3 = . . . = 2N1IN (21.7)

    Thus, the output voltage of the R-2R D/A converter is given by Eq. 21.5.

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-6Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Digital-To-Analog Converters

    Figure 21.9: (a) Conceptual illustration of a current-scaling D/A converter,(b) Implementation of (a)

    Figure 21.10: A current-scaling D/A converter using an R-2R ladder

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-7Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Digital-To-Analog Converters

    21.2.2 Voltage Scaling D/A Converters

    A voltage-scaling D/A converter is shown in Fig. 21.11. Its output voltage at any tap i canbe expressed as

    Vi =Vref

    8(i 0.5) (21.8)

    The output voltage of the D/A converter is then determined by the values of the inputs b1,b2 and b3.

    Figure 21.11: Illustration of a voltage-scaling D/A converter

    The structure of this voltage-scaling D/A converter is very regular and thus well suited forMOS technology. A problem with this type of D/A converters is the accuracy requirementsof the resistors used. This makes it difficult to build D/A converters of this type with morethan 8 bit resolution.

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-8Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog-To-Digital Converters

    21.3 Analog-To-Digital Converters

    The objective of an A/D converter is the determination of the digital word corresponding tothe analog input signal. Usually a sample-and-hold circuit (see Fig. 21.6) is required at theinput of the A/D converter because it is not possible to convert a changing analog signal. Ablock diagram of a general A/D converter is shown in Fig. 21.12. The ideal input-outputcharacteristics for a A/D converter are shown in Fig. 21.13.

    Figure 21.12: Block diagram of a general analog-to-digital converter

    Figure 21.13: Ideal input-output characteristics for a 3-bit A/D converter

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-9Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog-To-Digital Converters

    21.3.1 Serial A/D Converters

    Two possible implementations of serial A/D converters are single-slope and dual-slope A/Dconverters. Both will not be discussed in detail here. The main advantages of these convertersis their simplicity, their main disadvantage is the long conversion time required.

    21.3.2 Successive Approximation A/D Converters

    This type of A/D converters converts an analog input into an N-bit digital word in N clockcycles. Consequently, the conversion time is less than for the serial converters without muchincrease in the complexity of the circuit. Fig. 21.14 shows an example of a successive approx-imation A/D converter architecture.

    Figure 21.14: Example of a successive approximation A/D converter archi-tecture

    The successive approximation process is shown in Fig. 21.15.

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-10Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog-To-Digital Converters

    Figure 21.15: The successive approximation process

    21.3.3 Parallel A/D Converters

    In many applications, it is necessary to have a smaller conversion time than is possible withthe previously described A/D converter architectures. Parallel A/D converters, also known asflash A/D converters, typically require down to one clock cycle for conversion. An architectureof a 3-bit parallel A/D converter is shown in Fig. 21.16.

    Parallel A/D converters can reach typically up to 20 MHz for CMOS technology. The sample-and-hold time may though be larger than 50 ns and could prevent this conversion time frombeing realised. Another problem is that the number of comparators required is 2N1. For Ngreater than 8, too much area is required.

    One method of achieving small system conversion times is to use slower A/D converters inparallel, which is called time-interleaving and is shown in Fig. 21.17. Here M successiveapproximation A/D converters are used in parallel to complete the N -bit conversion of oneanalog signal per clock cycle. The sample-and-hold circuits consecutively sample and applythe input analog signal to their respective A/D converters. N clock cycles later, the A/Dconverter provides a digital word output. If M = N , then a digital word is given out everyclock cycle. If one examines the chip area for an N -bit A/D converter using the parallel A/Dconverter architecture (M = 1) compared with the time-interleaved architecture for M = N ,the minimum area will occur for a value of M between 1 and N .

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-11Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog-To-Digital Converters

    Figure 21.16: A 3-bit parallel A/D converter

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-12Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog-To-Digital Converters

    Figure 21.17: A time-interleaved A/D converter array

    VLSI DesignCourse 21-13Darmstadt University of TechnologyInstitute of Microelectronic Systems 0

  • Analog-To-Digital Converters

    21.3.4 Sigma-Delta A/D Converter

    Introduction

    The basic structure of a sigma-delta converter is shown in Fig. 21.18. The sigma-delta con-verter can be referred to as an oversampling converter, although oversampling is just one ofthe techniques contributing to the performance of a sigma-delta converter. The sigma-deltaconverter shown in Fig. 21.18 quantizes an analog signal with very low resolution (1 bit) anda very high sampling rate (2 MHz). With