of 1 /1
1183 it should be made known to the public that when no medical practitioner is called in the duty of notify- ing certain specified infectious diseases to the medical officer of health devolves on the head of the family. The new Act has another advantage besides securing the uni- versality of the system of noti6cation. With one single exception all notifications in England and Wales will be carried ont under the provisions of the general Act of 1889, the local Acts being repealed. The exception is unfortunate. It applies to Huddersfield, where the provisions as io notifi- cation are less efficient than under the general Act and where the medical fees are insufficient. The exception was introduced almost at the last moment in the House of Lords and was probably not opposed by the Government lest at the then late period of the session the Bill might have been lost. AN INSULT TO THE ARMY MEDICAL SERVICE. IN a report of the Colchester Oyster Feast in the Times of Thursday last it is stated that "in responding for Our Defensive Forces,’ Sir Claude de Crespigny said that unless Sir W. Symons was killed by the Army doctors there was every hope of his recovery." We have no hesitation in branding this unmerited and unwarrantable insult as a shameful libel on a splendid body of men. Doubtless the speech (which must have been a very interest- ing one, for the above sentence is all that the Times records ! ) was of the nature of that after-dinner buffoonery which apes humour; but surely it is possible to be funny and at the same time to preserve good taste. We trust sincerely that Sir William Symons will live to express a very different opinion of the services of "Army doctors" to that enunciated by Sir Claude Champion de Crespigny, Baronet, late R.N. and Captain 60th Rifles, for of a certainty, if happily his life be preserved, he will owe it to those medical officers on whose behalf as well as that of the whole Army Medical Service we make this indignant protest. We trust that an apology will be forthcoming from Sir Claude de Crespigny, and we must add that in our opinion the editor of the Times should have paused before giving to that gentleman’s words the world wide publicity of its columns. We should have thought that the present time, when the services of the officers of the Royal Army Medical Corps are so much in request, was singularly inopportune for the utter- ance and publication of such a coarse and unworthy gibe. AN ENCOURAGING FEATURE OF THE RECENT FOG. THERE were some interesting features connected with the recent onset of a very dense fog in the metropolis which appear to have escaped notice. Fog was, of course, the inevitable concomitant of the peculiar meterological con- ditions prevailing a week ago. The atmospheric pres- sure steadily increased, an anticyclonic system asserted itself, the temperature fell, and there was no wind. The fog was general and is reported to have been the densest ever encountered in the English Channel, but it was white, and above all it was comparatively white in London. Despite its density, which led to the complete disorganisation of railway and vehicular traffic, there was but a slight approach to the proverbial pea-soup hue, and the Egyptian darkness in which on such occasions London has been invariably plunged was conspicuous by its non-occurrence. Though there was gloom artificial light was not resorted to on anything like the scale of old when the day was as night. Can this be the eminently satisfactory result of the strong measures taken during the year to abate the smoke nuisance ? and may we congratulate ourselves on our own attitude on this question since we have urged for several years that the adequate provision contained in the Public Health Act which has been so badly neglected in the past 1 should be vigorously enforced ? The Coal Smoke Abate- . ment Society has been very active in this direction and it must be admitted that good on all sidest : has been done and an eyesore largely removed and , a source of injury to health to some extent banished. : The air of London has been cleaner lately and the. densely smoking chimney appears to be the exception rather than the rule amongst the myriads of chimneys that. abound. All this is very encouraging and should stimulate- the authorities and others to keep up their excellent vigilance, so that those offenders who may still remain may yet be brought to book. The reward is great if we are right in our interpretation of the fact that this recent visita- tion of an exceedingly dense fog was unaccompanied by absolute opacity, a quality derived entirely from the foul out- pourings of metropolitan chimneys. It would be idle to. pretend that the recent fog was not unpleasant and irritating but it was shorn of that terribly depressing character arising from the complete absence of health-giving light. THE YARROW HOME FOR CONVALESCENT CHILDREN. THE third annual report and balance-sheet of this institu- tion, for the year 1898, are before us and are in every way satisfactory. Our readers will remember the objects with which it was instituted-viz., to provide a pleasant con- valescent home on a health-giving coast for 100 children of a class superior to that of those who are pro- vided for in the ordinary hospitals and homes. The wise and generous conception of Mr. Yarrow has been in every way realised save, indeed, in one respect- that of numbers. The numbers increase year by year. The average number in the home has been 70, but in September only was the full complement reached. It is indeed a model institution. No subscriptions are allowed. The only favour asked is to send suitable cases to the trustees, and the trustees look to medical men for care in selection. Infectious cases are carefully excluded, and when by any mischance they occur they are as carefully isolated. The- report of the medical officer, Mr. Frank Brightman, is satisfactory. Of 970 inmates, 647 are returned as cured, 69 as greatly benefited, and 193 as improved ; 14 showed no, improvement, and six were sent out for operation. On Dec. 31st 41 children remained in the house. Such a record is creditable to the trustees and to the medical officers and nurses. The founder has his own reward. If he has any insomnia owing to thinking of the efficiency of those vessels of destruction in the designing and building of which he is an expert, he must have his antidote in the consciousness that he has established an effective home for classes which are as needy as the poor and not less capable of appreciating consideration. His example is being followed by others, and ere long it is to be hoped we shall have all we- want in the way of hospitals and convalescent homes. bountifully provided by the rich for those who need and appreciate help. - THE LATEST PHASE OF BABY-FARMING. AT Marylebone Police-court on Oct. 21st a woman named Mary Fidler was summoned by the London County Council for contravening the Infant Life Protection Act in that she maintained one infant in excess of the number licensed by the Council. The evidence seems to have been somewhat obscure, but it came out that the Council had its municipal eye upon Mrs. Fidler in May, 1899, when she was looking after a child named Graham. In June the inspector again visited the house, when it was found that she had care of a child named Felstead, whom she had taken care of for a few days and who had been removed that day by its mother. On August 18ch the child Graham died and at the

AN ENCOURAGING FEATURE OF THE RECENT FOG

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: AN ENCOURAGING FEATURE OF THE RECENT FOG

1183

it should be made known to the public that whenno medical practitioner is called in the duty of notify-ing certain specified infectious diseases to the medicalofficer of health devolves on the head of the family. The

new Act has another advantage besides securing the uni-

versality of the system of noti6cation. With one singleexception all notifications in England and Wales will becarried ont under the provisions of the general Act of 1889,the local Acts being repealed. The exception is unfortunate.It applies to Huddersfield, where the provisions as io notifi-cation are less efficient than under the general Act andwhere the medical fees are insufficient. The exception wasintroduced almost at the last moment in the House of Lordsand was probably not opposed by the Government lest at thethen late period of the session the Bill might have been lost.

AN INSULT TO THE ARMY MEDICAL SERVICE.

IN a report of the Colchester Oyster Feast in the Timesof Thursday last it is stated that "in responding for OurDefensive Forces,’ Sir Claude de Crespigny said that

unless Sir W. Symons was killed by the Army doctorsthere was every hope of his recovery." We have no

hesitation in branding this unmerited and unwarrantableinsult as a shameful libel on a splendid body of men.Doubtless the speech (which must have been a very interest-ing one, for the above sentence is all that the Times records ! )was of the nature of that after-dinner buffoonery which apeshumour; but surely it is possible to be funny and at thesame time to preserve good taste. We trust sincerely thatSir William Symons will live to express a very different

opinion of the services of "Army doctors" to that enunciatedby Sir Claude Champion de Crespigny, Baronet, late R.N. andCaptain 60th Rifles, for of a certainty, if happily his life bepreserved, he will owe it to those medical officers on whosebehalf as well as that of the whole Army Medical Servicewe make this indignant protest. We trust that an

apology will be forthcoming from Sir Claude de Crespigny,and we must add that in our opinion the editor ofthe Times should have paused before giving to that

gentleman’s words the world wide publicity of its columns.We should have thought that the present time, when theservices of the officers of the Royal Army Medical Corps areso much in request, was singularly inopportune for the utter-ance and publication of such a coarse and unworthy gibe.

AN ENCOURAGING FEATURE OF THERECENT FOG.

THERE were some interesting features connected with therecent onset of a very dense fog in the metropolis whichappear to have escaped notice. Fog was, of course, theinevitable concomitant of the peculiar meterological con-ditions prevailing a week ago. The atmospheric pres-sure steadily increased, an anticyclonic system asserteditself, the temperature fell, and there was no wind. The fogwas general and is reported to have been the densest everencountered in the English Channel, but it was white, andabove all it was comparatively white in London. Despiteits density, which led to the complete disorganisation ofrailway and vehicular traffic, there was but a slightapproach to the proverbial pea-soup hue, and the Egyptiandarkness in which on such occasions London has been

invariably plunged was conspicuous by its non-occurrence.Though there was gloom artificial light was not resortedto on anything like the scale of old when the day wasas night. Can this be the eminently satisfactory result ofthe strong measures taken during the year to abate thesmoke nuisance ? and may we congratulate ourselves on ourown attitude on this question since we have urged for severalyears that the adequate provision contained in the PublicHealth Act which has been so badly neglected in the past

1 should be vigorously enforced ? The Coal Smoke Abate-. ment Society has been very active in this direction

and it must be admitted that good on all sidest: has been done and an eyesore largely removed and, a source of injury to health to some extent banished.: The air of London has been cleaner lately and the.

densely smoking chimney appears to be the exceptionrather than the rule amongst the myriads of chimneys that.abound. All this is very encouraging and should stimulate-the authorities and others to keep up their excellent

vigilance, so that those offenders who may still remain mayyet be brought to book. The reward is great if we are

right in our interpretation of the fact that this recent visita-tion of an exceedingly dense fog was unaccompanied byabsolute opacity, a quality derived entirely from the foul out-pourings of metropolitan chimneys. It would be idle to.

pretend that the recent fog was not unpleasant and irritatingbut it was shorn of that terribly depressing character arisingfrom the complete absence of health-giving light.

THE YARROW HOME FOR CONVALESCENTCHILDREN.

’ THE third annual report and balance-sheet of this institu-

tion, for the year 1898, are before us and are in every waysatisfactory. Our readers will remember the objects withwhich it was instituted-viz., to provide a pleasant con-valescent home on a health-giving coast for 100 childrenof a class superior to that of those who are pro-vided for in the ordinary hospitals and homes. Thewise and generous conception of Mr. Yarrow has beenin every way realised save, indeed, in one respect-that of numbers. The numbers increase year by year.The average number in the home has been 70, but in

September only was the full complement reached. Itis indeed a model institution. No subscriptions are allowed.The only favour asked is to send suitable cases to the trustees,and the trustees look to medical men for care in selection.Infectious cases are carefully excluded, and when by anymischance they occur they are as carefully isolated. The-

report of the medical officer, Mr. Frank Brightman, is

satisfactory. Of 970 inmates, 647 are returned as cured, 69as greatly benefited, and 193 as improved ; 14 showed no,

improvement, and six were sent out for operation. OnDec. 31st 41 children remained in the house. Such arecord is creditable to the trustees and to the medicalofficers and nurses. The founder has his own reward. Ifhe has any insomnia owing to thinking of the efficiencyof those vessels of destruction in the designing and buildingof which he is an expert, he must have his antidote in theconsciousness that he has established an effective home forclasses which are as needy as the poor and not less capable ofappreciating consideration. His example is being followedby others, and ere long it is to be hoped we shall have all we-want in the way of hospitals and convalescent homes.

bountifully provided by the rich for those who need andappreciate help.

-

THE LATEST PHASE OF BABY-FARMING.

AT Marylebone Police-court on Oct. 21st a woman namedMary Fidler was summoned by the London County Councilfor contravening the Infant Life Protection Act in that shemaintained one infant in excess of the number licensed bythe Council. The evidence seems to have been somewhat

obscure, but it came out that the Council had its municipaleye upon Mrs. Fidler in May, 1899, when she was lookingafter a child named Graham. In June the inspector againvisited the house, when it was found that she had care ofa child named Felstead, whom she had taken care of fora few days and who had been removed that day by itsmother. On August 18ch the child Graham died and at the