Adam Wagner Architecture & Design Portfolio

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Selected works from my undergraduate education at the University of Michigan, 2012-2014 (in-progress)

Text of Adam Wagner Architecture & Design Portfolio

  • adam wagnerarchitecture + design

  • P O O L // contemporary american reinterpretation of the bathhousewinter_2014

    B I S E C T // exploring the intersection of public and private spacewinter_2013

    C A R V E // translation of digital media into physical formfall_2012

    M O L D // transposition of solid_void relationships in CARVEfall_2012

    I N F L A T E // the no-frills chicago firehousefall_2013

    C O N S T R U C T // construction documentation using AutoCAD + Revitfall_2012 + winter_2014

    CONTENTS04

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    C R A F T // documentation of model-making abilitiesfall_2012 + winter_2013 + fall 2013

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  • 4P O O L // contemporary american reinterpretation of the bathhousearch 442 design studio IVwinter 2014

    using the relationships discovered and examined in CARVE, the goal of this project was to reimagine the complex voids of the white layer model, and translate them into mass. simultaneously, mass had to be reinterpreted as void, so as to fully understand the nature of space and how it operates as a solid and void. spatial capabilities are realized through a shift in hierarchy between space and mass.

    unlike CARVE, which employed an iterative process to develop the most appropri-ate spatial solution, MOLD developed as a slow abstraction of the existing spaces of carve. Basswood was cut down into facted pieces to create the exterior shell of the white layer model. a bounding box of 4x6x8 (the size constraints of CARVE) was built around the shell to complete the mold into which rockite would be poured.

    after the rockite dried, the mold was extracted turning the original voidspace of CARVE into a solified concrete sculpture

    RIGHT: 1/4 scale model of the Barcelona Pavilion; constructed with museumboard & acrylic

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  • 6The project began with an exploration into pool typological precedents, including buildings such as

    the Barcelona Pavilion, the Kaufmann Desert House, Angkor Wat, and the Therme Vals. Analysis of the

    pools includes their location in plan and section, relationships to different spaces, structure, and vi-

    sual acoustics. Documentation for each of these properties can be found in the technical illustrations.

    R E S E A R C H

  • 7ABOVE: Sliding glass cor-ner doors open the interior space to the outdoor pool deck, creating a seamless transition between liv-ing spaces. The horizontal plane of the pool is treated as an equally important space.

    LEFT: Planar organization of the Kaufmann House is utilized to establish a seamless spatial layout. Roof planes extend far be-yond walls to create a visual expansion of space onto the horizontal plane of the pool deck and water.

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    ABOVE: Sliding glass corner doors open the interior space to the outdoor pool deck, cre-ating a seamless transition between living spaces. The horizontal plane of the pool is treated as an equally impor-tant space.

    ABOVE: Sliding glass corner doors open the interior space to the outdoor pool deck, cre-ating a seamless transition between living spaces. The horizontal plane of the pool is treated as an equally impor-tant space.

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    structure is pushed to the outer edge of the pool, suggesting the pool is part of the entire spatial sequence

    glass corners allow for the visual continuation of the living room into the pool

    the pool physically hugs the corner of the interior floor slab, providing both continuity of space, and juxtaposition of material

    visual frame created by the extension of structure over the pool

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    Phase two dealt with the multiplicities of form and how each iteration of a pools container ampli-

    fies particular effects, both physical and ephemeral. Transparency, reflectivity, and acoustics were ana-

    lyzed as three major components of the human experience that lead to biopsychosocial changes in us-

    ers of specific pools. Bathhouse precedents were analyzed through the architectures of their pools and their

    respective effects on human anatomy and well-being. Lastly, analysis of American drug and caffeine use related to

    increased stress in the workplace provides a context in which the bathhouse could be reinterpreted and implemented.

    A N A L Y S I S

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    Korean JjimjilbangSequential.Social.Gendered.

    Finnish SaunaCommunal.Isolated.Wet steam.

    Russian BanyaCommunal.Complex.Dry heat.

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    1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013

    110

    115

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    135

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    1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013

    Illicit Drugs

    Num

    ber o

    f Cti

    tzen

    s

    Year

    Num

    ber o

    f Cit

    zens

    Year

    1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013

    Num

    ber o

    f Cit

    zens

    59

    61

    63

    65

    67

    69

    71AlcoholTobacco

    Average Hours Worked Per WeekFull + Part-Time Workers (Overtime NOT Included)

    United States

    Japan

    United Kingdom

    France

    25 Hours 30 35 40

    38.47

    Germany

    The Netherlands

    28.38

    27.04

    32.81

    26.57

    31.17

    Drug, Alcohol, + Tobacco Use In AmericaCitizens Over the Age of 16, Within the Past Month

    Stress Score Per CountryFactors Include Per Capita GDP, Annual Hours Worked, and Crime Rates

    United States

    Japan

    United Kingdom

    France

    15 20 25 30

    27.7

    Germany

    The Netherlands

    27.7

    24.6

    22.8

    16.9

    16.6

    Source: Business Week

    Source: Federal Reserve Economic Data

    Year

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    New York Citys Central Park was chosen as the site which would act as a loose framework the pools

    could operate within. The natural setting within a dense, chaotic urban environment provides the per-

    fect space accessible to millions of passersby daily. Three sites were chosen within the park based on specif-

    ic geographic qualities that would enhance the therapeutic and addictive characteristics inherent to each pool.

    I M P L E M E N T A T I O N

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    HERNSHEAD73RD ST, WEST SIDE SITE 03

    Visual + Spatial Separation

    The dominating presence of the glossy black container, as well as its position just north of the Hernshead rock, physically separates those relaxing on the rock, and those on the nearby bridle path. The pool creates an isolated space upon the outcrop-ping that can only be accessed by crossing the black pool.

    Glossy black surface becomes highly reflective with a thin sheet of water

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    THE GREAT LAWN83RD ST, MID-PARK SITE 01

    Falling WaterHoles in the bottom of the large swimming pool allow water to drip down into a collection pool below. The cadence of the falling water echoing within the concrete box creates a tranquil space below the very active gathering space above

    ScaleThe type of fix associated with each pool depends not only on the physical effects of water, but also the scale of the container. Large containers will naturally induce a communal feeling, while smaller containers return users a sense of intimacy

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    NORTH WOODS107TH ST, MID-PARK SITE 02

    Mirrored FacadeReflective panels allow the structure to camoflauge itself, while the opaque glass column filled with steam gives alert passersby a glimpse of its presence

    Shallow Flash-Steam PoolA tall glass column protrudes from the mirrored structure, acting like a furnace and chimney, while providing an extremely hot + humid experience for those either inside the column or within the cabin

    Transparent glass container; pool has a depth of 1.5 of hot water

    Large mirrors are attached to the frame of the building

    Weathered grey wood absorbs the moisture and heat, ensuring the cabin maintians a very elevated temperature

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    C E N T R A L P A R KSITE 03Hernshead

    X

    SITE 01The Great Lawn

    X

    SITE 02North Woods

    X

    SITE AWorker

    The Promontory

    X

    SITE BLover

    Adventure Playground

    X

    SITE CWorker

    East Green

    X

    SITE DRebel

    The Ramble

    X

    SITE EWorker

    Gothic Bridge, No. 28

    X

    SITE FLover

    East Meadow

    X

    Detailed map of Central Park, NY indicating the 3 sites of the contemporary bathhouses (labeled SITE 01, SITE 02, SITE 03) and proposed sites for future bathhouses/therapy pools (labeled SITE A, SITE B, etc). Sites 01, 02, & 03 were chosen based on specific geographic qualities that would en-hance the inherent character of each pool, there-by maximizing their therapeutic effectiveness.

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    C E N T R A L P A R KSITE 03Hernshead

    X

    SITE 01The Great Lawn

    X

    SITE 02North Woods

    X

    SITE AWorker

    The Promontory

    X

    SITE BLover

    Adventure Playground

    X

    SITE CWorker

    East Green

    X

    SITE DRebel

    The Ramble

    X

    SITE EWorker

    Gothic Bridge, No. 28

    X

    SITE FLover

    East Meadow

    X

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    C A R V E // translation of digital media into physical formarch 312 design studio Ifall 2012

    digital media lends itself the power of representing 3_dimensional qualities upon a 2_dimensional plane, but what of a full transformation into tangible reality? this design studio investigates the translation of ideas from one form of representation into another, while simultaneously developing an under-standing of the spatial relationships be