Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA
Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA
Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA
Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA

Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA

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Text of Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA

  • Accipiter gentilis -- (Linnaeus, 1758) ANIMALIA -- CHORDATA -- AVES -- ACCIPITRIFORMES -- ACCIPITRIDAE Common names: Northern Goshawk; Autour des palombes; Eurasian Goshawk; Goshawk

    European Red List Assessment European Red List Status

    LC -- Least Concern, (IUCN version 3.1)

    Assessment Information Year published: 2015 Date assessed: 2015-03-31 Assessor(s): BirdLife International Reviewer(s): Symes, A. Compiler(s): Ashpole, J., Burfield, I., Ieronymidou, C., Pople, R., Wheatley, H. & Wright, L. Assessment Rationale European regional assessment: Least Concern (LC) EU 27 regional assessment: Least Concern (LC)

    At both European and EU27 scales this species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (30% decline over ten years or three generations).

    For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern within both Europe and the EU27.

    Occurrence Countries/Territories of Occurrence Native: Albania; Andorra; Armenia; Austria; Azerbaijan; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Georgia; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Ireland, Rep. of; Italy; Latvia; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Moldova; Montenegro; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Russian Federation; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey; Ukraine; United Kingdom; Gibraltar (to UK) Vagrant: Canary Is. (to ES)

    Population The European population is estimated at 166,000-220,000 pairs, which equates to 332,000-440,000 mature individuals. The population in the EU27 is estimated at 55,800-81,200 pairs, which equates to 112,000-162,000 mature individuals. For details of national estimates, see Supplementary PDF.

    Trend In Europe and the EU27 the population size is estimated to be decreasing by less than 25% in 21 years (three generations). For details of national estimates, see Supplementary PDF.

    Habitats and Ecology The species is mainly resident, but its northernmost populations in Scandinavia and Russia migrate south between September and November, returning in March and April (Snow and Perrins 1998, Orta and Marks 2014). Soaring flight is used frequently (Snow and Perrins 1998). It is always seen singly or in pairs (Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001). It inhabits mature woodland, preferring areas near clearings and the forest edge. Small birds and mammals make up the vast majority of its diet, with grouse, pheasants and partridges being especially important in boreal zones. Nests are built on the forks or branches of large trees and are made of sticks, lined with twigs and fresh leaves. Clutches are usually two to four (Orta and Marks 2014).

    http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/userfiles/file/Species/erlob/supplementarypdfs/22695683_accipiter_gentilis.pdf http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/userfiles/file/Species/erlob/supplementarypdfs/22695683_accipiter_gentilis.pdf http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/userfiles/file/Species/erlob/supplementarypdfs/22695683_accipiter_gentilis.pdf http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/userfiles/file/Species/erlob/supplementarypdfs/22695683_accipiter_gentilis.pdf

  • Habitats & Altitude Habitat (level 1 - level 2) Importance Occurrence

    Artificial/Terrestrial - Urban Areas suitable breeding Artificial/Terrestrial - Urban Areas suitable non-breeding Forest - Boreal suitable breeding Forest - Temperate major breeding Grassland - Tundra suitable breeding Altitude 0-3400 m Occasional altitudinal limits

    Threats Significant declines in Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries are thought to have resulted from persecution and deforestation, with later declines in the 1950s and 1960s a result of poisoning from pesticides and heavy metals. Persecution continues to be a threat, as is nest robbing for falconry (Orta and Marks 2014). It is also highly vulnerable to the impacts of potential wind farm developments (Strix 2012). Threats & Impacts

    Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses Agriculture & aquaculture

    Agro-industry plantations

    Timing Scope Severity Impact Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant

    Declines Medium Impact

    Stresses Ecosystem conversion

    Biological resource use

    Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals (persecution/ control)

    Timing Scope Severity Impact Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant

    Declines Medium Impact

    Stresses Species mortality

    Energy production & mining

    Renewable energy Timing Scope Severity Impact Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant

    Declines Medium Impact

    Stresses Species mortality

    Pollution Herbicides and pesticides

    Timing Scope Severity Impact Ongoing Minority (

  • Map (see overleaf)