Academic Vocabulary

  • View
    38

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Academic Vocabulary. Athena MS March 19, 2013. Our Agenda:. Understand the tiering of words Distinguish between Tier 2 and 3 words Explore Tier 2 words in greater depth Activity. Some Food for Thought…. Most children enter first grade with 6,000 words in spoken vocabulary - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Academic Vocabulary

  • Academic Vocabulary

    Athena MSMarch 19, 2013

  • Our Agenda:Understand the tiering of wordsDistinguish between Tier 2 and 3 wordsExplore Tier 2 words in greater depthActivity

  • Some Food for ThoughtMost children enter first grade with 6,000 words in spoken vocabularyStudents will learn 3,000 more words per year through third grade

    (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2002)

  • Some Food for ThoughtSocioeconomic status has a huge impact on vocabulary:First grade students from higher-SES groups have twice as many words as lower-SES childrenHigh school seniors near the top of their class know 4 times as many words as lower-performing studentsHigh-knowledge third graders have vocabularies equal to lowest-performing 12th graders

    With so many words to learn, and such a huge vocabulary gap, how do we know which words to teach???

    (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2002)

  • Tiers of Words Helpful lens through which to consider words for instructional attention

    From: Bringing Words to Life (2002) by Isabel L. Beck, Margaret G. McKeown, & Linda Kucan321

  • From: Bringing Words to Life (2002) by Isabel L. Beck, Margaret G. McKeown, & Linda KucanTier 1Most basic wordsRarely require instructional attention(baby, happy, clock)

  • From: Bringing Words to Life (2002) by Isabel L. Beck, Margaret G. McKeown, & Linda KucanTier 3Low frequencyContent-specific(isotope, peninsula)

  • From: Bringing Words to Life (2002) by Isabel L. Beck, Margaret G. McKeown, & Linda KucanTier 2High frequency for mature language usersFound across a variety of domainsHave a powerful impact on verbal functioningMostly found in written language(Coincidence, absurd, industrious, fortunate)

    **Instruction of Tier II words can be most productive.**

  • For exampleStuart Little, the small mouse with big parents, had nothing on baby marsupials. Marsupials (mar-SOUP-ee-ulz) are special kinds of mammals. Even the biggest ones give birth to babies that are incredibly small. A two-hundred-pound six-foot mother kangaroo, for instance, gives birth to a baby as small as a lima bean. Thats what makes marsupials marsupials. Their babies are born so tiny that in order to survive they must live in a pouch on the mothers tummy. The pouch is called a marsupium. (Dont you wish you had one?)

    From: Montgomery, Sy. Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea. Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 2006.

  • For exampleStuart Little, the small mouse with big parents, had nothing on baby marsupials. Marsupials (mar-SOUP-ee-ulz) are special kinds of mammals. Even the biggest ones give birth to babies that are incredibly small. A two-hundred-pound six-foot mother kangaroo, for instance, gives birth to a baby as small as a lima bean. Thats what makes marsupials marsupials. Their babies are born so tiny that in order to survive they must live in a pouch on the mothers tummy. The pouch is called a marsupium. (Dont you wish you had one?)

    From: Montgomery, Sy. Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea. Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 2006.

  • For exampleStuart Little, the small mouse with big parents, had nothing on baby marsupials. Marsupials (mar-SOUP-ee-ulz) are special kinds of mammals. Even the biggest ones give birth to babies that are incredibly small. A two-hundred-pound six-foot mother kangaroo, for instance, gives birth to a baby as small as a lima bean. Thats what makes marsupials marsupials. Their babies are born so tiny that in order to survive they must live in a pouch on the mothers tummy. The pouch is called a marsupium. (Dont you wish you had one?)

    From: Montgomery, Sy. Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea. Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 2006.

  • Tier 3 vs. Tier 2 WordsMarsupialsMammalsLima beanMarsupium

    IncrediblyFor instanceSurvive

    Which words will give you the biggest bang for your buck???

  • Criteria for Selecting Tier 2 Words Importance & utility

    Instructional potential

    Conceptual understanding

    (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2002)

  • The final decisions about which words to teach may not be as important as thoughtful consideration about why to teach certain words and not others.

    (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2002)

  • Building Academic VocabularyWhere do I begin???

    Trade books

    Text books

    Complex text

  • Building Academic VocabularyWhen do I infuse this type of instruction?During readingOn the spot, brief explanations to avoid comprehension barriersAfter readingDirect, rich, lively instruction of several story wordsDirect=explain meaningRich=requires processingLively=not boring

    (Beck, 2003)

  • For more information

    Bringing Words to LifeBuilding Academic Vocabulary, Teachers ManualMonroe 2 BOCESlive binder: http://www.monroe2boces.org/professionalDev.cfm?subpage=2388

  • Activity

    Welcome to Addressing the Three Tiers of Vocabulary within the Common Core Learning Standards*In this video, you will explore the idea of tiering words, which stems from the book Bringing Words to Life by Isabel Beck, Margaret McKeown, and Linda Kucan. This book was heavily referenced when drafting the Common Core Standards. You will understand how to distinguish between the 3 tiers, and then look more closely at tier 2 and tier 3 words. You will further explore tier 2 words, or academic vocabulary, and then identify a variety of instructional strategies you can use to build academic vocabulary for your students.*Before we begin, here is some food for thought. Research shows that children enter first grade with 6,000 words in their spoken vocabulary. We also know that students will learn 3,000 more words per year through third grade. Those numbers can seem quite overwhelming when considering words to choose for vocabulary instruction.*Research also shows that socioeconomic status has a significant impact on vocabulary development. We know that (read bullets). Given the number of words children should learn a year and the potential gap teachers may see, how do we know which words to teach?**In an effort to help teachers make these instructional decisions, Bringing Words to Life describes a tiering system for words. Given that not all words call for instructional attention, a tiering system creates a lens through which teachers can choose words to teach.

    *Tier 1 words are the most basic words that we use in our daily oral language. They are high frequency words and, therefore, rarely require instructional attention. These are words like table, chair, pencil. *Tier 3 words are content-specific, or domain-specific words. They are limited to a particular domain or content area. Given that limited nature, they are low frequency words because they are not encountered in a wide variety of contexts. These are words like amoeba, tarriff, parallellagram. These words are often a large focus in the content areas because they are critical to learning the specific content. As teachers, we have become quite skilled at teaching our students these tier 3 words.*Where we have fallen a bit short is tier 2 words, or academic vocabulary. These words are high-frequency in that they are found across a variety of domains. They may even have different meanings in different contexts. They are words that are often seen in print, but may not be used in oral language as often. These are words like evaluate, product, measure. Often times these words can be a barrier to a text for a student. They can also be a barrier when assessing a student. For example, if a student did not know the word unlikely and they were asked which of the following choices is unlikely to cause a chemical reaction, the student would probably struggle to show their understanding of the content.*Lets look at how the tiering of words might help us make instructional decisions. This is an excerpt from the 4-5 band of Appendix B of the Common Core standards. (read aloud)When choosing words for instruction, the teacher might choose marsupials, mammals, lima bean, or marsupium. These are probably words students are unfamiliar with, but are important to understanding the text. The teacher would probably engage in some sort of direct instruction around these words given their importance. The words identified above are tier 3 words in that they are limited to this particular context and are not necessarily found across a variety of domains. Although they are important, given their limited use, the bulk of instructional time would be better spent on tier 2 words. **In looking at this text again for tier 2 words, the teacher might identify incredibly, for instance, and survive, although there may be others depending on your students and their vocabularies. These are words that would be found in multiple contexts and could potentially be a barrier for students within this text. Given their high use, the importance of these words warrants instructional attention.In comparing the two sets of words identified in the same passage, it is clear which set would give you the biggest bang for your buck. While tier 3 words are important, tier 2 words are worth more instructional time, which may be a shift for many teachers.**Given the nature of tier 2 words, it can be quite overwhelming when trying to identify which words to teach for a particular text. Therefore, the authors of Bringing Words to Life established a set of criteria to help select words for instruction. The first is importance & utilityit is important to choose words that are characteristic of mature language users and appear frequently across a variety of domains. The words should be those that will be used by students across a variety of domains and are of impor