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REVIEWS. Practical Toxicology for Physicians and Students. By Prof. Dr Rudolf Kobert, Late Director of the Pharmacological Institute, Dorpat, Russia. Translated and edited by L. H. Friedburg, Ph.D. New York: William R. Jenkins, 1897. THE translator of Dr Kobert's work on Practical Toxicology says in the preface that he has for several years followed it in his lectures at the American Veterinary College. It is not a work that we should care to recommend to the British veterinary students, though we do not doubt that it may be useful to students of analytical chemistry, for whom we should have thought it was mainly intended. The book has been rendered into good English, though the spelling of a word here and there suggests that a process of differ- entiation of the language is going on on opposite sides of the Atlantic. The Clinical Diagnosis of Lameness in the Horse. By W. E. A. Wyman, V.S., Professor of Veterinary Science at Clemson A. and M_ College, and Veterinarian to South Carolina. New York: William R. Jenkins, 1898. THE author of this work has endeavoured to fill an undoubted gap in English veterinary literature, and in his preface he disarms a good deal of criticism by admitting that it is primarily a compilation, and that for a great deal of the matter in it he is indebted to the German works of Professor Moller. But a book may be very useful although it contains little matter that is quite original, and we can cordially recommend this one to the English-speaking veterinary student. The opening chapter gives some useful directions as to the method of detect- ing the lame leg, and the second discusses in a general way the detection of the precise seat of lameness. The remainder of the work is devoted to a detailed consideration of the lamenesses of each region of the fore and hind limbs, and those rarer forms due to morbid conditions in other parts of the body. The text is illustrated by a number of Figures, and we are sorry to have to say of some of these that they do little credit to the artist. We trust that this defect may be remedied in a second edition. The book is very neatly bound and printed. A Text-Book of Horse-Shoeing for Horse-shoers and Veterinarians_ By A. Lungwitz, Instructor in the Theory and Practice of Horse-shoeing, and Director of the Shoeing School of the Royal Veterinary College in Dresden. Translated from the eighth German edition by John W. Adams, A.B., V.M.P., Professor of Surgery and Obstetrics, and Lecturer on Shoeing in the Veterinary Department, University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1898. As a scientific and practical treatise on horse-shoeing, the German work of which this is a slightly abridged translation has no equal in any language, and it is somewhat strange that although the first edition of it appeared nearly thirty years ago, it has only now been made available for English readers. The translation by Professor Adams is considerably smaller than the original work,

A Text-Book of Horse-Shoeing for Horse-shoers and Veterinarians

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Page 1: A Text-Book of Horse-Shoeing for Horse-shoers and Veterinarians

REVIEWS.

Practical Toxicology for Physicians and Students. By Prof. Dr Rudolf Kobert, Late Director of the Pharmacological Institute, Dorpat, Russia. Translated and edited by L. H. Friedburg, Ph.D. New York: William R. Jenkins, 1897.

THE translator of Dr Kobert's work on Practical Toxicology says in the preface that he has for several years followed it in his lectures at the American Veterinary College. It is not a work that we should care to recommend to the British veterinary students, though we do not doubt that it may be useful to students of analytical chemistry, for whom we should have thought it was mainly intended. The book has been rendered into good English, though the spelling of a word here and there suggests that a process of differ­entiation of the language is going on on opposite sides of the Atlantic.

The Clinical Diagnosis of Lameness in the Horse. By W. E. A. Wyman, V.S., Professor of Veterinary Science at Clemson A. and M_ College, and Veterinarian to South Carolina. New York: William R. Jenkins, 1898.

THE author of this work has endeavoured to fill an undoubted gap in English veterinary literature, and in his preface he disarms a good deal of criticism by admitting that it is primarily a compilation, and that for a great deal of the matter in it he is indebted to the German works of Professor Moller. But a book may be very useful although it contains little matter that is quite original, and we can cordially recommend this one to the English-speaking veterinary student.

The opening chapter gives some useful directions as to the method of detect­ing the lame leg, and the second discusses in a general way the detection of the precise seat of lameness. The remainder of the work is devoted to a detailed consideration of the lamenesses of each region of the fore and hind limbs, and those rarer forms due to morbid conditions in other parts of the body. The text is illustrated by a number of Figures, and we are sorry to have to say of some of these that they do little credit to the artist. We trust that this defect may be remedied in a second edition. The book is very neatly bound and printed.

A Text-Book of Horse-Shoeing for Horse-shoers and Veterinarians_ By A. Lungwitz, Instructor in the Theory and Practice of Horse-shoeing, and Director of the Shoeing School of the Royal Veterinary College in Dresden. Translated from the eighth German edition by John W. Adams, A.B., V.M.P., Professor of Surgery and Obstetrics, and Lecturer on Shoeing in the Veterinary Department, University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1898.

As a scientific and practical treatise on horse-shoeing, the German work of which this is a slightly abridged translation has no equal in any language, and it is somewhat strange that although the first edition of it appeared nearly thirty years ago, it has only now been made available for English readers. The translation by Professor Adams is considerably smaller than the original work,

Page 2: A Text-Book of Horse-Shoeing for Horse-shoers and Veterinarians

REVIEWS. 85

mainly owing to the omission of the chapters dealing with the history of horse· shoeing and the minute anatomy of the hoof. Perhaps from the point of view of the veterinary surgeon, and certainly from that of the farrier, these omissions will not be thought to detract greatly from the value of the translation.

The first chapter, extending to forty pages, is devoted to a description of the horse's foot, admirably clear in respect of its wording, and made still more plain by no fewer than thirty-seven woodcuts, of which it would be impossible to speak too highly. This is followed by a chapter of twenty pages, in which the relationship of the foot to the entire limb is discussed. The remainder of the work falls into two parts, one of which deals with the shoeing of the healthy hoof, while the second treats of what may be termed pathological shoeing. The text throughout is profusely illustrated, and there is not a bad figure in the book. Professor Adams has done the work of translation weH, and he is to be congratulated on having produced a work that deserves a wide sale among veterinary surgeons and shoeing-smith~ in the United States.

A Handbook of Horse-shoeing, with introductory chapters on the Anatomy and Physiology of the Horse's Foot. By Jno. A. W. Dollar, M.R.C.V.S., with the collaboration of Albert Wheatley, F.R.C.V.S. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1898.

Mr DOLLAR has already laid the veterinary profession in this country under a debt of gratitude by his translation of Moller's text-book on Operative Veteri­nary Surgery, and now, after a brief interval, he has, with the assistance of Mr Wheatley, made another welcome addition to English vt'terinary literature.

In the preparation of this work Mr Dollar has taken the German text-book by Lungwitz, above referred to, as his model, and, indeed, it may be said that the English work is mainly a free translation of the German one, with such omissions, additions, and emendations as were considered necessary, in order to meet the requirements of English readers. This is freely acknowledged in the preface, and although the plan which has been adopted is not free from objection, those for whom the book is intended need not complain, as it has produced a work that is certainly of greater value to English readers than a mere translation of the German work would have been.

The book forms a handsome volume of over 400 pages, and it is most lavishly illustrated, having an average of about onc illustration for each page. These include the illustrations of the German work, supplemented by a series of admirable plates with large-sized figures of the various patterns of horse· shoes in use in this country. For these and the text descriptive of them Mr Wheatley is responsible, and Professor Mettam has contributed some pages dealing with the structure of the foot.

Putting aside the introduction and an excellent history of the art of horse­shoeing, the work falls into three sections, of which the first is devoted to the anatomy and physiology of the horse's foot, the second to the general prin­ciples of shoeing and the shoeing of the healthy foot in the various classes of horses, while the third treats of the shoeing of diseased feet and those of lame horses. The shoeing of oxen, and teaching schools for farriers, are subjects discussed in an appendix.

Space forbids that we should do more than give this bare outline of the con­tents of the work. We have said enough to indicate that it constitutes an exhaustive treatise on the subject with which it deals, and if it obtains the sale that it deserves it will do much to extend the practice of rational shoeing, and may, in part at least, compensate for the lack of properly established schools for the scientific teaching 'of farriery in this country.