A language for learning (thinking maps)

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<ul><li> 1. Leadership SummitLaredo ISD2012PreparedbyMs. M. Ramirez</li></ul> <p> 2. Welcome toLeadership SummitLaredo ISD2012PreparedbyMs. M. Ramirez 3. What are Thinking Maps &amp; why do they work?What is the purpose of each map?How do I teach the maps to my students?How do I use the maps to help students develop literacyskills?TODAYS AGENDA 4. Chapter 1: INTRODUCTIONChapter 2: TEACHINGChapter 3: LITERACY LINKSChapter 4: CONTENTCONNECTIONSChapter 5: INSTRUCTIONALSTRATEGIESChapter 6: ASSESSMENTTABLE OF CONTENTSSample Lesson Plans &amp; Black Line MastersAcademic Vocabulary, Reading, WritingLiterary Analysis, Mathematics, Science,Social StudiesCurriculum and Lesson Planning,Cooperative Learning, DifferentiationTheory and Thinking Maps IntroducedStudent Assessment and Self-Assessment Quizzes 5. children orPetsMs. M. RamirezBackgroundArmy BratAlways on a diet____ wifeLove movies,books, jokesthe brainladyThinking MapsPat WolfePeople whoinfluencedChurchElem. Princ.C&amp;I Director Teacher 6. Putting Theory into Practice Write your first name in the center of the page Draw a circle around your name Draw a larger circle outside of the inner circle withyour namealmost the size of the page Fill in the outer circle with information about yourself 7. Add a Frame of Reference Draw a rectangle around the edge of the page In each corner write the names of key people whohave influenced you or brief statements ofexperiences that influenced you. Pass your circle map to the right and let thatperson read it and circle two things they want toknow more about Discuss the two things that were circled with themin more detail 8. Things that tellsomething about youThings/people that have influenced youTEACHING THE CIRCLE MAPYourName 9. Circle MapDefining in Context Used to define a thing or idea Defines in context Thing or idea is in the center Supporting information is in outer circle 10. You HaveAppliedThinkingMaps toLiteracy SkillsYour students are beginningto use Thinking Maps todeepen their understandingof academic vocabulary.You have modeled the use ofThinking Maps for writingacross the curriculum.You have integrated the useof Thinking Maps with yourstudents note takingstrategies.Your students are beginningto use Thinking Maps asstrategies to improve theirreading comprehension.CHAPTER 3LITERACYLINKSChapter 3LITERACY LINKS 11. Chapter 3 12. You HaveAppliedThinking Mapsto A Variety ofContent AreasYour students are beginningto use Thinking Maps todeepen their understandingof academic vocabulary.You have integrated the useof Thinking Maps with yourstudents note takingstrategies.Your students are beginningto use Thinking Maps in theirunderstanding of Literature,Science, Social Studies, andMathematicsChapter 4CONTENTCONNECTIONS 13. Chapter 4 14. You HaveIntegratedThinking Mapsfor EffectiveInstructionalStrategiesYou can use Thinking Maps forCurriculum and Lesson Planning.You use Thinking Mapsindependently across disciplines toencourage student meta-cognition,self-reflection, and assessment.You and your students constructThinking Maps for a variety ofapplications in order to explain,revise, and synthesize ideas.You have embedded Thinking Mapsin other instructional strategies.Your students use multiple ThinkingMaps in collaborative team work.Page 233Chapter 5INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES 15. Chapter 5 16. You HaveIntegratedThinking Mapsfor EffectiveInstructionalStrategiesYou can use Thinking Maps forCurriculum and Lesson Planning.You use Thinking Mapsindependently across disciplines toencourage student meta-cognition,self-reflection, and assessment.You and your students constructThinking Maps for a variety ofapplications in order to explain,revise, and synthesize ideas.You have embedded Thinking Mapsin other instructional strategies.Your students use multiple ThinkingMaps in collaborative team work.Page 233Chapter 6ASSESSMENT 17. What areThinkingMaps andhow are theydifferentfrom GraphicOrganizers?Use a CircleMap to defineThinkingMaps. 18. 80% of all information thatcomes into our brain isVISUAL40% of all nerve fibersconnected to the brain arelinked to the retina36,000 visual messages per hourmay be registered by the eyes.-Eric Jensen,Brain BasedLearning 19. Long Beach Unified School District, California Stefanie R. Holzman, Principal K-5 Urban, Inner-City School 1200 minority students 85% enter school with Spanish astheir primary language Was expected to achieve 11 pointincrease in growth Achieved 184 point growthincrease over a 4 year periodafter implementing ThinkingMaps.ROOSEVELT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 20. Nine Essential PracticesThat Are Supported byEducational ResearchRESEARCH CONNECTIONS 21. CATEGORY ESPERCENTILEGAINIdentifying similarities and differences 1.61 45Summarizing and note taking 1.00 34Reinforcing effort and providing recognition .80 29Homework and practice .77 28Nonlinguistic representations .75 27Cooperative learning .73 27Setting goals and providing feedback .61 23Generating and testing hypothesis .61 23Activating prior knowledge .59 22Nine Instructional StrategiesComparing andContrastingClassifyingSeeing Analogies 22. Knowledge is stored in two forms:Research proves that the more we useboth systems of representation,the better we are able tothink and recall knowledge.DUAL CODING THEORYLinguistic Form Nonlinguistic Form 23. It has been shown thatexplicitly engaging students in thecreation of nonlinguisticrepresentationsstimulates and increases activity in thebrain. (see Gerlic &amp; Jausovec, 1999)BRAIN RESEARCHCONNECTION 24. Page 5 25. The Thinking Maps givestudents a concrete visualpattern for an abstractcognitive skill. 26. A Framework for Understanding PovertyRuby K. Payne, Ph.D.Chapter Eight: Instruction and Improving AchievementThe true discrimination that comes out ofpoverty is the lack of cognitive strategies.The lack of these unseen attributeshandicaps, in every aspect of life, theindividual who does not have them. 27. The overwhelming need for learners is formeaningfulness we do not come to understand asubject or master a skill by sticking bits of informationto each other.Understanding a subject results from perceivingrelationships. The brain is designed as a patterndetector.Our function as educators is to provide our studentswith the sorts of experiences that enable them toperceive patterns that connect.Making Connections: Teaching and the Human Brain (1994), Caine &amp; CaineBRAIN COMPATIBLE TEACHING 28. Thinking Mapsstoreinformation theway the braindoes.Pat Wolfe 29. DendritesCell BodyAxonSynapse 30. NEURONS THAT FIRE TOGETHERGET WIRED TOGETHER.THAT IS WHAT A PATTERN IS! 31. Thought process: SequencingWhen do you use sequencing in:READING?SOCIAL STUDIES?SCIENCE?MATH?In every instance, you could use aWRITING?FLOW MAPTHE ARTS? 32. ReadingIdentify and explainstory elements,including plotsummary. Retell astory.WHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE?The Flow Map 33. ScienceInvestigate, compare, and contrastthe different life cycles of differentliving things.WHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE?The DoubleBubble Map 34. Social StudiesList the qualities of a leaderWHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE?The BubbleMap 35. MathExplain the relationship amongfractions, decimals, and percents;translate among variousrepresentations of equal numbersWHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE?The Bridge Map 36. TEACHER / STUDENT INPUT 37. PROCESSING 38. EXTENSION 39. So how are Thinking Maps different from graphicorganizers? 40. Hearing Words Seeing WordsSpeaking Words Generating Words 41. Better learning will comenot so much from findingbetter ways for theteacher toINSTRUCT......but from giving the learner better ways toCONSTRUCT MEANING.Seymore Papert, 1990THE MAPS SHOULD BECOMESTUDENT TOOLS FOR THINKING. 42. Thought Process DrawingGuidingQuestionsKeyInformationClassroomIdeasCautionsINFORMATION FOR EACHTHINKING MAP 43. Identify the THOUGHT PROCESSDEFINING IN CONTEXTKEY WORDSContext, List, Define, Tell everything you know,Brainstorm, Identify, Relate prior knowledge, Explorethe meaning, Associate, GenerateNOTE TAKING GUIDE 44. GUIDING QUESTIONSGuiding Questions for Constructinga Circle Map:What are the context clues thathelp define this word, topic or idea?What do you already know aboutthis word, topic or idea?Guiding Questions for Adding aFrame of Reference:How do you know what you know?Where are you getting yourinformation? 45. KEYWORDSFORTHINKINGMAPS 46. ClosureTake some time to meet by grade levelor department in order to plan howyou will use Thinking Maps todifferentiate the content, process orproduct of your curriculum. 47. I ALSO HAVE A GAME FOR THE CLOSURE AND THE NOTEBOOK FORYOU .YOU MIGHT WANT TO PRINT PARTS OF THE BOOK FOE THE AUDIENCE.THERE IS MORE INFORMATION AND LOTS OF EXAMPLES THAT I WILLSHARE WITH YOU.HAVE A GREAT WEEKENDACTIVITY 1 THE CIRCLE MAPACTIVITY 2 THE MATCHING GAMEACTIVITY 3 THE WINDOW PANE GROUPS OF EIGHT </p>