A FRESH approach to pediatric audiometry - A FRESH approach to pediatric audiometry; Should we stop

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of A FRESH approach to pediatric audiometry - A FRESH approach to pediatric audiometry; Should we stop

  • A FRESH approach to pediatric audiometry;  Should we stop using NBN now?

    Presentation given at AudiologyNOW!, Anaheim 2013

    Johannes Lantz, Otometrics A/S, HEARsound Laboratories ‐ CopenhagenLund

    Hannah Holmes, Institute of Sound and Vibration Research,  SouthamptonSouthampton

  • What this is aboutWhat this is about 10

    Frequency (kHz) 0.5 2 3 41

    ‐10

    0

    10

    20

    Average Left Ear HTLs  as a Function of Stimuli20

    30

    40

    50e l ( dB

    )

    as a Function of Stimuli

    Pure tone

    F50

    60

    70

    80

    H ea rin

    g  Le ve Frequency 

    modulated tone

    Narrowband  noise

    FRESH80

    90

    100

    FRESH 

    110

    120

  • Masking NoiseMasking Noise Dr Robert Bárány, MD, Vienna (1876 to 1936)

    se um

    .c om

    se um

    .c om

    he ar in ga id m us

    he ar in ga id m us

    “The Barany Box is inserted in the hearing ear and w w w .h

    w w w .h

    “It is scarcely necessary to enumerate the manyThe Barany Box is inserted in the hearing ear and creates a loud buzzing sound while the examiner shouts in the deaf ear to determine if the patient can hear anything. If the patient cannot hear the words shouted, then the ear is considered "Barany Deaf“”

    It is scarcely necessary to enumerate the many objections to the use in audiometry of such masking devices as the Bárány noise box and jets of air or water. They are unpredictable in effect and awkward in use.” (Denes & Naunton 1952)then the ear is considered Barany Deaf.

    (Source: www.hearingaidmuseum.com) (Denes & Naunton, 1952)

    The sound level produced by this Barany Box measured a whopping  110 dB if ´ B D f b f110 dB, so if you weren´t Barany Deaf before… 

  • NBN MaskingNBN Masking ’ h d f d d d• 1950’s: The advantage of NBN over Wide Band Noise was recognized

    – Masking Efficiency: the relation between a sound's ability to mask and its  loudness. A sound with high masking efficiency is one with good masking  ability but minimal loudness.

    – 1/3 octave Narrow Band Noise

    dB

    Wide Band Narrow Band

    Hz

    Narrow Band

  • Effective Masking Level CorrectionsEffective Masking Level Corrections

    Critical Ratio: SNR at threshold when shifted by the noise

    Since the NBN masking noise is wider than the critical band, some  energy that is ”wasted” outside must be accounted for in the calibration

    Amounts in Decibels (dB) to be Added to the Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) to  achieve Effective Masking (dB EM) for One‐Third Octave Band Masking Noises

    (Extract from ANSI S3.6‐2004 American National Standard Specifications for Audiometers)

  • Standing Waves in Sound FieldStanding Waves in Sound Field ( ) d f• Pure tones (sine waves) gives rise to standing waves at certain frequencies

    • What are the available options that may also be of interest for a hard‐to‐ impress toddler?p

    • Warble and Narrow Band Noise have been used extensively for many  years as sound field stimuli for pediatric audiometry h l i li l d h i i di i di• These popular stimuli also made their way into pediatric audiometry  under headphones and inserts

  • Standing Waves in Sound Field H Dillon and G Walker Stimuli for audiometric testing

    Standing Waves in Sound Field H. Dillon and G. Walker, Stimuli for audiometric testing.  J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 71, No. 1, January 1982

  • More concerns about NBN filter slopesMore concerns about NBN filter slopes

    • Orchik and Mosher (1975) – “…realize that the noise parameters, especially bandwidth and filter slope, can result in 

    a significant overestimate of threshold sensitivity in patients with sloping audiometric  configurations.”

    • Orchik and Rintelmann (1978) – ”...for subjects with sharply sloping high frequency sensorineural hearing losses... 

    ...narrow band noise may substantially overestimate pure tone threshold sensitivity.”

    • Stephens and Rintelmann (1978) 

    Average difference  from normalized pure  tone thresholds pertone thresholds per  stimulus type for sharp  configurations

  • Principle illustrated using the OTOsuite Hearing Loss Simulator 

    Pure tone stimulus

    Test frequency

  • Principle illustrated using the OTOsuite Hearing Loss Simulator 

    FRESH noise stimulus

    Test frequency

  • Principle illustrated using the OTOsuite Hearing Loss Simulator 

    NBN as stimulus

    If we present a Narrow Band  masking noise as stimulus atmasking noise as stimulus at  the same level, the patient will  respond to the circled area  where the narrow band noise  spills over into the audible  range. Hence we will continue  decreasing the stimulus level  until the patient stops  responding...

    Assumed test  frequency

  • Principle illustrated using the OTOsuite Hearing Loss Simulator 

    NBN as stimulus

    The patient stops  responding and weresponding and we  mark the assumed  threshold and thus  underestimate the  hearing loss

    Assumed test  frequency

  • Principle illustrated using the OTOsuite Hearing Loss Simulator 

    NBN as stimulus

    This picture illustrates why there is no  evident problem when the hearing loss isevident problem when the hearing loss is  relatively flat. The stimulus remains  within the inaudible range across all  frequencies q

  • FREquency Specific Hearing noiseFREquency Specific Hearing noise h ” ” d f h d d (• The ”recipe” used for FRESH noise in the Madsen Astera Audiometer (GN  Otometrics) from Walker, Dillon and Byrne (1984)

  • Sloping AudiogramsSloping Audiograms

    (Walker, Dillon and Byrne, 1984)

  • FRESH Noise in Astera control panelsFRESH Noise in Astera control panels

    Classic mode Sunshine mode

  • -15

    -10

    -5

    0

    p ea

    k)

    -45

    -40

    -35

    -30

    -25

    -20 A

    m p

    lit u

    d e

    (d B

    r e

    NBN 100 1000 10000

    -50

    -45

    Frequency (Hz)

    5

    0

    NBN

    -30

    -25

    -20

    -15

    -10

    -5

    tu d

    e (d

    B r

    e p

    ea k)

    100 1000 10000 -50

    -45

    -40

    -35

    Frequency (Hz)

    A m

    p lit

    Warble

    -15

    -10

    -5

    0

    ea k)

    -40

    -35

    -30

    -25

    -20

    A m

    p lit

    u d

    e (d

    B r

    e p

    e

    100 1000 10000 -50

    -45

    Frequency (Hz)

    FRESH

  • Sound ExamplesSound Examples

    NBN 500 Hz           FRESH 500 Hz            NBN 1000 Hz             FRESH 1000 Hz

  • Pilot study Subject #1Subject #1 

  • Pilot study Subject #1Subject #1 

    Erling B L1 NBN, R2 NBN

  • Pilot study Subject #1Subject #1 

    Erling B L1 NBN, R2 NBN

  • MATLAB ModellingMATLAB Modelling

    0.1 1 10

    Frequency (kHz)

    b. Dead region: 1-4 kHz

    0.1 1 10 -10

    0

    10

    20 H

    L )

    30

    40

    50

    60

    h re

    sh o

    ld (d

    B H

    70

    80

    90

    100

    T

    tone

    NBN

    FRESH

  • First subject at ISVRFirst subject at ISVR Frequency (kHz)

    ‐10

    0

    Frequency (kHz) 0.5 2 3 41

    10

    20

    30

    B)

    Average Left Ear HTLs  as a Function of Stimuli

    Pure tone 40

    50

    60

    ar in g  Le ve l ( dB

    Frequency  modulated tone

    Narrowband  70

    80

    90

    H ea noise

    FRESH 

    100

    110

    120

  • Consequence of NBNConsequence of NBN h h d d h l h l ll ?• What consequence may the underestimated hearing loss have clinically?

    Underestimated hearing loss                                 True hearing loss (NBN)

  • DSL 5 Aided Response TargetDSL 5 Aided Response Target

    Underestimated hearing loss                                  True hearing loss (NBN)

  • ReferencesReferences American National Standards Institute ANSI S 3 6 2004 American national standard specification forAmerican National Standards Institute. ANSI S 3.6‐2004, American national standard specification for 

    audiometers”

    Denes, P., Naunton, R.F. (1952). Masking in Pure‐tone Audi