A Closer Look at Close Reading

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A Closer Look at Close Reading. Essential Question: How do we get students engaged in complex text? Objective: At the end of this presentation I will have a better understanding of Close Reading. What is Close Reading?. Think, Pair, Share. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<p>CLOSE READING</p> <p> A Closer Look at Close Reading</p> <p>Essential Question: </p> <p> How do we get students engaged in complex text?</p> <p>Objective:</p> <p> At the end of this presentation I will have a better understanding of Close Reading.</p> <p> What is Close Reading? Think, Pair, ShareTo read closely means to gain the meaning of the text and how it works from an analysis of the text itself, with little or no outside information. Such reading includes reading and rereading. Timothy Shanahan True or False</p> <p>-Set the purpose for reading. -Students read text as independently as possible. -The first read should be without building background. -Focus should be on the key ideas and details in the text. (main idea, story elements, or key details) -Following the first read, have students Think-Pair-Share to assess what they have gleaned from the text. FIRST READ: KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS</p> <p> SECOND READ: CRAFT AND STRUCTURE -This reading focuses on text features, organizational patterns and content vocabulary the author included. -Students reread selected text focusing on text dependent question. -Students use pencils, highlighters, or post-its to mark the text. -After rereading, students discuss the text with partners or in small groups, focusing on the authors craft and organizational patterns. -After students share with partners or in small groups, have groups share out with entire class to assess understanding.</p> <p>THIRD READ: INTEGRATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND IDEAS</p> <p> -The third close reading of a text should go even deeper, requiring students to synthesize and analyze information based on a text dependent question. </p> <p> -The focus is on what the text means to the reader and how it connects to other experiences. </p> <p> -The students use pencils, highlighters, or post-its to mark the text. </p> <p> -Discuss the text evidence in response to the text dependent question. </p> <p> -Students respond in writing. Seeing the responses in writing will help the teacher assess the students level of understanding.</p> <p>8READ WITH A PENCIL</p> <p>Number the paragraphs</p> <p>Chunk the text</p> <p>Underline and circle with a purpose.</p> <p>Left margin: What is the author SAYING? (short summary)</p> <p>Right margin: Dig deeper into the text Resources for Close ReadingOne Page Online Reading PassagesReadWorks.orgClose Reading with Text Dependent Questions10Middle School Article of the WeekOpinion PagesRoom for a DebateAwesome StoriesClose Reading Template</p> <p>Close Reading Lessons13Text Dependent Question SamplesA text dependent question specifically asks a question that can only be answered by referring explicitly back to the text being read. </p> <p>Close Reading Video</p> <p>5th grade students use Close Reading strategies to determine the main idea and important details from a newspaper. Close Reading Video</p> <p>Close Reading Video</p> <p>This video shows a teacher using Close Reading with an Interactive Read Aloud about Gorillas. (grades 3-5) This video shows second graders reading complex text about communities. </p> <p>Essential Question: </p> <p>How do we get students engaged in complex text?</p> <p>Objective:</p> <p>At the end of this presentation I will have a better understanding of Close Reading. Next steps.</p> <p>RUSD training videosShare passages with grade levelEvaluating text for Close Reading</p> <p>18</p> <p>Developed by Kathy Perret </p> <p>Based on the work of Timothy Shanahan, Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, Diane Lapp and Beth Burke </p> <p>1 </p> <p>CLOSE READING </p> <p>PART A Pre Planning </p> <p>Teacher: </p> <p>CCSS: </p> <p>Grade: </p> <p>Date: </p> <p>STEP 1: Choose Text Text should be short, complex and worthy of a close read. Remember to include a wide range of genre over </p> <p>time. </p> <p> Title: </p> <p>Author: </p> <p>Page(s): </p> <p>STEP 2: Determine the complex ideas in text that require close reading. Choose which apply. Keep close reading lesson FOCUSED. </p> <p> Language </p> <p>Word Choice </p> <p>Vocabulary </p> <p>Reading Complexity </p> <p>Other: __________________________________________ </p> <p>Narrative Stance/Craft and Structure </p> <p>Who is telling the story or writing the article? </p> <p>How are they telling the story or information? </p> <p>Text Structure </p> <p>Other: __________________________________________ </p> <p>Context </p> <p>Historical context of document </p> <p>Authors background Other: __________________________________________ </p> <p>Syntax </p> <p>The order in which words appear </p> <p>Repeated phrases </p> <p>Developed by Kathy Perret </p> <p>Based on the work of Timothy Shanahan, Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, Diane Lapp and Beth Burke </p> <p>2 </p> <p>STEP 3: Generate text-dependent questions Select several high cognitive level questions that you may ask depending on students conversations with you and each other. Questions should require students to use the authors words. Prompt to use text evidence. </p> <p>Use the progression of text-dependent questions as a guide to scaffold less. </p> <p>1. </p> <p>2. </p> <p>3. </p> <p>4. </p> <p>5. </p> <p>6. </p> <p>7. </p> <p>Developed by Kathy Perret </p> <p>Based on the work of Timothy Shanahan, Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, Diane Lapp and Beth Burke </p> <p>3 </p> <p>PART B Close Reading Lesson </p> <p>Establish Purpose The purpose of the first read is to determine what the text says. Establish a purpose. Limit front loading. Front </p> <p>loading should not take students away from text. </p> <p> Lets read to find out </p> <p>Remind Students: If you come to an unfamiliar word, look inside the word (structural analysis) for familiar portions </p> <p>and outside the word (contextual analysis) for clues to its meaning. List words in the margin that you use this </p> <p>technique with and other words that you are still stuck on. </p> <p>Encourage students to make notes to themselves about major events. </p> <p>Encourage students to circle or underline words, phrases, or sentences that are unclear to them. </p> <p>First Read: The first reading of a text should allow the reader to determine what a text </p> <p>says. Decide who will read the passage for the first time. Rule of thumb: primary grades teacher will do first read; </p> <p>upper grades students may do first read themselves. </p> <p> Teacher Read Student Read </p> <p>Notes (if needed) </p> <p>First Discussion: Partner Talk and Check Meaning Student dialogue about understanding of text. This can come in the form of a Think-Pair-Share. (Teacher listens </p> <p>and assesses what students have gleamed from the text.) Question posed should reflect purpose set. </p> <p> Have students use a language frame such as: I was amazed to learn </p> <p>Developed by Kathy Perret </p> <p>Based on the work of Timothy Shanahan, Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, Diane Lapp and Beth Burke </p> <p>4 </p> <p>Second Discussion: Assessing for Understanding and Confusion. (Key ideas and Details) </p> <p> Invite students to share their amazing fact (or things learned) with the whole group. This will provide initial insight </p> <p>in to what portions of the text students understood. </p> <p>Ask students what words or phrases were unfamiliar or unclear to them and how they attempted to resolve </p> <p>them. Note students responses, as these will guide you regarding what should be modeled. </p> <p>Second Reading: The second reading should allow the reader to determine how a text </p> <p>works. (Craft and Structure) </p> <p>Teacher-Led Shared Reading and Think Aloud </p> <p>Notes on focus area: </p> <p>Third Discussion: Text-Dependent Questions The purposes of text-dependent questions are to prompt rereading, encouraging textual evidence to support </p> <p>answers, and deepen comprehension of analytic processes. This should not take the form of a worksheet! </p> <p> Use the text-dependent questions you developed in the pre-planning stage. </p> <p>Notes: </p> <p>Developed by Kathy Perret </p> <p>Based on the work of Timothy Shanahan, Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, Diane Lapp and Beth Burke </p> <p>5 </p> <p>Third Reading: Evaluate quality of text The third reading should allow the reader to evaluate the quality and value of the text (and to connect the text </p> <p>to other texts). (Integration of Knowledge and Ideas) </p> <p>Notes: </p> <p>Fourth Discussion: Strive for meaning The fourth discussion can take the form of a writing prompt or extended discussion with a focus on synthesizing </p> <p>ideas. </p> <p> Sample prompts: </p> <p>Why is this important for me to know? </p> <p>How will this help me? </p> <p>What message did you take away from reading the text? Why: </p> <p>Which passage of the text would you consider most significant or important? Why? </p> <p>Notes: </p> <p>Teacher Reflection (sample questions, not limited to): </p> <p> How did students respond? </p> <p> What was their level of understanding? </p> <p> What could be revised to improve the close reading? </p> <p> What are your next steps in this process? </p> <p> Do you need to provide additional support for small groups of students? </p> <p> GENERAL QUESTION PROMPTS </p> <p> How do you know? </p> <p> Explain your thinking. </p> <p> What is the evidence? </p> <p> What is the authors purpose? How do you know? </p> <p> What is the authors point of view? How do you know? </p> <p> The phrase ___ means ___. </p> <p> I think the author means ___ when he/she says ___. </p> <p> ___ is an example of ___. </p> <p>FICTION CHARACTER ANALYSIS </p> <p> What do you know about (character)? What words does the author use to show you? </p> <p> What are (characters) strengths? Weaknesses? What words and phrases does the author use for each? </p> <p> How does the main character treat other characters? What evidence does the author include? </p> <p> How does the main character change throughout the story? What evidence does the author include? </p> <p> How does the author show each characters feelings? </p> <p>GENERAL QUESTION PROMPTS </p> <p> What does the author want us to know about ___? </p> <p> What is the authors message to his/her readers? </p> <p> What ideas in the text support/validate ___? </p> <p> What do you learn from the illustrations? </p> <p> What do we know from the title and cover? </p> <p> What context clues tell you what (word) means? </p> <p> What do you notice about the authors use of punctuation? </p> <p> What does ___ mean? How do you know? </p> <p>FICTION ELEMENTS AND STRUCTURES </p> <p> How does the author help you learn about the setting (time, place, season)? What do you learn from the text? From the </p> <p>illustrations? </p> <p> How does the character react to the setting? How do you know? </p> <p> How does the setting change through the story? How do you know? </p> <p> How does the dialogue help you understand the interaction between characters? </p> <p>NONFICTION TEXT FEATURES </p> <p> What new information did you learn from the captions? </p> <p> Why did the author use (specific text feature) on this page? </p> <p> How does the author use ___ (table of contents, index, glossary, labeled diagram, heading, bold/underlined/ </p> <p>italicized words) to help you gain information? </p> <p> What text structure(s) does this author use (question/ answer, problem/solution, description, cause/effect, </p> <p>sequence, compare/contrast)? Why was this a good choice? </p> <p>FICTION ELEMENTS AND STRUCTURES </p> <p> An author usually does some research to help him/her write the text. What evidence of research do you find in this text? </p> <p> Can you tell if the story describes a particular culture? How do you know? Would the story be different if set in a </p> <p>different culture/setting? </p> <p> How does the sequence of events develop the story? </p> <p> Describe the major events of ___, in order. </p> <p>NONFICTION </p> <p> What did you learn after reading this ___ (sentence, paragraph, passage, page)? </p> <p> What is the most important point in this ___ (paragraph, passage, page, piece)? How do you know? </p> <p> What supporting details does the author include to help you learn about ___? </p> <p> What does the author think about ___? </p> <p>AUTHORS WORD CHOICE </p> <p> What words or phrases grab your attention? </p> <p> What words or phrases tug at your heart? </p> <p> What beautiful language does the author use? </p> <p> What words (color, size, shape, material, proper names) help the author be specific? </p> <p> What strong verbs do you notice? How do they help you visualize the authors meaning? </p> <p> How do the authors words help develop sensory images? </p> <p>AUTHORS WORD CHOICE </p> <p> How does the author use transition words (such as first, last, suddenly, later) to help you transition from sentence to </p> <p>sentence, paragraph to paragraph, and section to section? </p> <p> What comparisons (simile, metaphor, personification) do you notice in the text? How do they help you understand </p> <p>the text? </p> <p> What onomatopoeia, interjections, and alliteration does the author use? How does it support you as a reader? </p> <p>Prompts for Text Dependent </p> <p>Questions </p> <p>(Source, in part: Connecting Reading &amp; Writing Through </p> <p>Authors Craft, The Reading Teacher, Rickards &amp; </p> <p>Hawes, Dec, 2006) </p>