2
may not contain enough new information to warrant the price. Rereading the first edition might be time better spent and money saved. (WFJ) MAKERS OF THE MODERN THOROUGHBRED, By Peter Willet; Published by University Press of Kentucky (1986) The development of a breed of horse specifically designed to excell at distances O f I to 1 1/2 miles at an early age is a relatively modem phenomenon. The artistocratic orientation of the English racing venture of the 18th and 19th centuries virtually guaranteed the impact of individual personalities on both the economic development of the industry and the selection of its breeding animals. Makers of the Modern Thoroughbred decribes the involvement of ten individuals whose "business has been the mixing and matching of blood lines to achieve the acme of precocious speed" during the 19th and 20th centuries. The equine careers of these individuals are presented through a series of interwoven anecdotes that not only communicate the flavor of the racing times, but also illutrate the various philosophies practiced by these breeders and breeder/trainers. Unfortunately, while the impact of each of the ten has been maximized by the author, any critical evalution of their methods has been minimized. Conse- quently, no mention is made of the co-selection of speed and frailty which resulted from the programs of these trendsetters, for example. Perhaps a more glaring shortcoming is the failure to explain thee training philosophies of any of the trainers included in the collection. Theauthor has been content to list their accomplishments and leave it at that. Remarks such as "it was better for an unsound horse to break down in training than in a race," attributed to Federico Tesio, go unexamined. In explanation, Tesio is proclaimed a "genius not only unwilling but incapable of communicating the whys and wherefors of his breeding and training policies": the author is apparently unwilling to undertake the task himself. For those interested in personalities and pedigrees, this book will provide some entertainment. Those hoping to gain some insight into the rationale behind the "modem Thoroughbred" will be disappointed. - - (MJG) PROCEEDINGS OF EIGHTH BAIN-FALLON MEMORIAL LECTURES: EQUINE MEDICINE (1986); Edited by Peter Huntington; Published by the Australian, Equine Veterinary Association, 134-136 Hampden Road, Artarmon, NSW 2064, Australia; 152 pages; $16.00U.S. The annual Bain Fallon Memorial Lectures, in Australia, have become one of the most enlightening equine symposia held anywhere in the world. This is the pro- ceedings from the 1986 lectures held at Surfers Paradise. In the past the lectures have taken a systems approach, but here the program covered selected aspects of the whole horse. The proceedings bring together contributors from Volume 7, Number 2 Australia, U,S.A. and England presenting up-to-date practi- cal information on traditional problems as well as information on new advances in the field. N. Edward Robinson writes on the structure and function of the normal equine respiratory system, covers material about bronchoalveolar lavage, and explains pulmo- nary defense mechanisms, effects of environment and in- fection. Robinson then continues with the effect of respiratory disease on the response to exercise, acute lung injury and the role of neutrophils, and then finally exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage-- a review of possible mechanisms. Glen A. Severin presents an update on equine ocular therapeutics, and a description of ophthalmoscopy, d~scrib- ing techniques and interpretation. Other topics covered in detail by Severin are Management of equine eyelid and cor- neal lacerations, equine recurrent uveitis and corneal ulcers. Jon D. Dunsmore details parasite control in performance horses, equine studs and recreational horses. Dunsmore also describes some important equine parasitic dermatoses. A section on surgery by K. A. Jacobs covers skin wound management techniques. L. B. Jeffcott describes methods for the assessment of bone strength. V. C. Speirs provides an assessment of prognosis for racing after carpal surgery in 210 Thoroughbreds. The pathogenesis and epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi, as well as diagnosis and control is covered by Mary D. Barton. R. J. Rose describes current advancements in exercise physiology in the horse. Finally, R. J. Rawlinson covers the use of ultrasound for medical diagnosis in the horse. The book in paper back is a real bargain at the price offered. The information is up-to-date and presented in a very rea~ble manner. (WEJ) VETERINARY PHARMACEUTICALS AND BIOLOGICALS 5TH EDITION, 1978/1979; Edited by Kim Townsend; Published by Veterinary Medicine Publishing Co. 9073 Lenexa Drive, Lenexa, KS 66215; 1035 pages; $32.95 U.S. This edition includes the latest available information on pharmaceuticals and biologicals used in veterinarymedicine. The publisher has updated the appendixes, revised the indexes to better meet the practitioner's needs, and expanded the product information section with the addition of several new companies. The sections of this reference book are: alphabetical fist of products by manufacturer; product name index; product category index; active ingredients index; product identi- fication; product information: pharmaceuticals & biologi- cals; product information: diets & nutritional supplements; and product information: diagnostic aids & suppfies. The appendix has 12 sections: antibiotic therapy in pet birds and reptiles; drug interactions; toxicology; principles of fluid therapy; drug therapy in lab~atory animals; normal values; fundamentals of prescription writing; metric sys- tem, apothecary system and other convenient conversion 99

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may not contain enough new information to warrant the price. Rereading the first edition might be time better spent and money saved. (WFJ)

MAKERS OF THE MODERN THOROUGHBRED, By Peter Willet; Published by University Press of Kentucky (1986)

The development of a breed of horse specifically designed to excell at distances O f I to 1 1/2 miles at an early age is a relatively modem phenomenon. The artistocratic orientation of the English racing venture of the 18th and 19th centuries virtually guaranteed the impact of individual personalities on both the economic development of the industry and the selection of its breeding animals. Makers of the Modern Thoroughbred decribes the involvement of ten individuals whose "business has been the mixing and matching of blood lines to achieve the acme of precocious speed" during the 19th and 20th centuries.

The equine careers of these individuals are presented through a series of interwoven anecdotes that not only communicate the flavor of the racing times, but also illutrate the various philosophies practiced by these breeders and breeder/trainers. Unfortunately, while the impact of each of the ten has been maximized by the author, any critical evalution of their methods has been minimized. Conse- quently, no mention is made of the co-selection of speed and frailty which resulted from the programs of these trendsetters, for example.

Perhaps a more glaring shortcoming is the failure to explain thee training philosophies of any of the trainers included in the collection. Theauthor has been content to list their accomplishments and leave it at that. Remarks such as "it was better for an unsound horse to break down in training than in a race," attributed to Federico Tesio, go unexamined. In explanation, Tesio is proclaimed a "genius not only unwilling but incapable of communicating the whys and wherefors of his breeding and training policies": the author is apparently unwilling to undertake the task himself.

For those interested in personalities and pedigrees, this book will provide some entertainment. Those hoping to gain some insight into the rationale behind the "modem Thoroughbred" will be disappointed. - - (MJG)

PROCEEDINGS OF EIGHTH BAIN-FALLON MEMORIAL LECTURES: EQUINE MEDICINE (1986); Edited by Peter Huntington; Published by the Australian, Equine Veterinary Association, 134-136 Hampden Road, Artarmon, NSW 2064, Australia; 152 pages; $16.00U.S.

The annual Bain Fallon Memorial Lectures, in Australia, have become one of the most enlightening equine symposia held anywhere in the world. This is the pro- ceedings from the 1986 lectures held at Surfers Paradise. In the past the lectures have taken a systems approach, but here the program covered selected aspects of the whole horse. The proceedings bring together contributors from Volume 7, Number 2

Australia, U,S.A. and England presenting up-to-date practi- cal information on traditional problems as well as information on new advances in the field.

N. Edward Robinson writes on the structure and function of the normal equine respiratory system, covers material about bronchoalveolar lavage, and explains pulmo- nary defense mechanisms, effects of environment and in- fection. Robinson then continues with the effect of respiratory disease on the response to exercise, acute lung injury and the role of neutrophils, and then finally exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage-- a review of possible mechanisms.

Glen A. Severin presents an update on equine ocular therapeutics, and a description of ophthalmoscopy, d~scrib- ing techniques and interpretation. Other topics covered in detail by Severin are Management of equine eyelid and cor- neal lacerations, equine recurrent uveitis and corneal ulcers.

Jon D. Dunsmore details parasite control in performance horses, equine studs and recreational horses. Dunsmore also describes some important equine parasitic dermatoses.

A section on surgery by K. A. Jacobs covers skin wound management techniques. L. B. Jeffcott describes methods for the assessment of bone strength. V. C. Speirs provides an assessment of prognosis for racing after carpal surgery in 210 Thoroughbreds.

The pathogenesis and epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi, as well as diagnosis and control is covered by Mary D. Barton. R. J. Rose describes current advancements in exercise physiology in the horse. Finally, R. J. Rawlinson covers the use of ultrasound for medical diagnosis in the horse.

The book in paper back is a real bargain at the price offered. The information is up-to-date and presented in a very rea~ble manner. (WEJ)

VETERINARY PHARMACEUTICALS AND BIOLOGICALS 5TH EDITION, 1978/1979; Edited by Kim Townsend; Published by Veterinary Medicine Publishing Co. 9073 Lenexa Drive, Lenexa, KS 66215; 1035 pages; $32.95 U.S.

This edition includes the latest available information on pharmaceuticals and biologicals used in veterinary medicine. The publisher has updated the appendixes, revised the indexes to better meet the practitioner's needs, and expanded the product information section with the addition of several new companies.

The sections of this reference book are: alphabetical fist of products by manufacturer; product name index; product category index; active ingredients index; product identi- fication; product information: pharmaceuticals & biologi- cals; product information: diets & nutritional supplements; and product information: diagnostic aids & suppfies.

The appendix has 12 sections: antibiotic therapy in pet birds and reptiles; drug interactions; toxicology; principles of fluid therapy; drug therapy in lab~atory animals; normal values; fundamentals of prescription writing; metric sys- tem, apothecary system and other convenient conversion

99

aids; certified regional poison control centers; registration with the drug enforcement admiuislration; and food-animal drug withdrawal times. (WEJ)

PARASITIC DISEASES OF THE HORSE By J. H. Arundel; Published by The University of Sydney, the Post-Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science (1985); 150 pages, paperback; $21.00 (Australian) postpaid. (All inquiries to: T. G. Hungerford, P.O. Box A561, Sydney South, NSW 2000, Australia.)

In this review the author has taken the clinician beyond the that which is normally provided in traditional parasi- tology texts, integrating a description of practical control measures on the farm. The book should he useful to horse-

mesa and veterinarians around the world, but it under- standably has an Australian point of view. A welcomed exception is the description of protozoan diseases which are uncommon in Australia.

As the author admits, the section on control of nematodes pets forth very few new thoughts. He does, however, provide an understanding of why rigid adherence to parasite control programs is important so that traditional control and therapy nw.usures will be effective.

Some diagnostic procedures have been included, e.g. a key to microfilaria and a key to the mites found on horses, as well as a host checklist and an organ checklist. The refer- ences are extensive and color illustrations are included in the text. (WEJ)

EQUINE NUTRITION AND PHYSIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

The Equine Nutrition and Physiology Society (ENPS) will hold its 10th Biennial Meeting at Colorado State University on June 11-13, 1987. The biennial meetings held by the Society are a format for scientists, industry, representatives and extension people to come together and exchange results of research projects and educational programs relating to the horse.

The objective of this Society is to promote quality research on equine nutrition and physiology, and es- tablish effective communication among researchers, teachers, extension and production personnel. It is anti- cipated that more than a hundred presentations of re- search projects will be made at this year's meeting. Scientists from various universities will present results from research studies on nutrition, exercise physiology, reproductive physiology and equine extension programs. Special mini-symposia are also planned to highlight important advances in equine reproduction, nutrition and exercise physiology. Speakers of international acclaim will be invited to participate in these mini-synmposia. Each scientist presenting information is required to pro- vide a manuscript which will be compiled into a proceedings.

At the last ENPS meeting held at Michigan State in 1985, scientists from 38 universities were represented, as well as equine scientists from junior colleges, and horse extension agents. Twenty-two horse-related industries, representing feed companies, manufacturing companies, breed associations and private horse farms helped sponsor the last meeting, generating $2700 in income for the Society, thus subsidizing the cost of the meeting and allowing student members to attend the meeting at a reduced rate. Several awards will be presented at this year's ENPS meeting to acknowledge those individuals that have made a contribution to the

Society and equine industry. The most prestigious honor that the Society bestows upon a member is the Distinguished Service Award in Equine Sciences." Recipients of the award posses outstanding character and abilities in administration, teaching, reasearch, extension or industry and include those that have provided valuable service to both the horse industry and the Equine Nutrition and Physiollogy Society. Dr. B.W. Pickett, Director of Animal Reproduction at Colorado State Unversity was the first recipient of this award. Junior scientist research awards will be presented to three young scientists that present the best written and oral Inesentation of a research project.

The 10th meeting will open on June 11 at 6:00 I'M with a tour of the new $3.5 milfion dollar Equine Science Teaching and Research facility at Colorado State University. A chuckwagon barbecue dinner and entertainment will follow. Friday and Saturday, June 12 and 13 will be full days of scientific presentations. The conference will end with a tour of the Colorado State Veterinary Teaching Hospital at 6:00 Saturday night.

Those scientists, industry representatives, teachers and horsemen interested in obtaining a copy of the proceedings should contact Dr. Warren Evans, Execu- tive Secretary, Equine Nutrition and Physiology Soci- ety, Department of Animal Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.

Membership in the society is open to any and all who are actively involved in the horse industry. The price for a two-year membership is $15 which includes the proceedings of the ENPS meeting. Registration information for the 10th ENPS meeting can be obtained from Dr. Ginger Rich, Department of Animal Science, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523.

100 EQUINE VETERINARY SCIENCE