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MANUAL OF EQUINE NEONATAL MEDICINE, By John E. Madigan; Published by Live Oak Publishing, P.O. Box 8329, Woodland, CA 95695 (1987); 364 pages;-paperback; $27.95. This pocket sized book (4"X 7") is designed to be a manual for the practicing veterinarian who is doing work with foals and wants specific, accurate, practical easy to find current information in this rapidly developing area of neonatal medicine. The author defines neonates as foals less than two weeks of age. As the author admits, this book is not a text, as such, "It should not be considered the final word nor be the limit of reading needed to be competent in the care of newborn foals. Current textbooks and review articles are available to provide background for those unfamiliar with procedures and drugs. Unfortunately, due to a lack of carefully controlled clinical trials done with foals we have'had to improvise and rely on other information in some instances. " The outline form used extensively in the manual lends itself well to the purpose of the handbook. Information is easy to find and quick to digest. The sections of the book are: Pregnant Mare, Foaling, and Post Birth; Nursing and Intensive Care Considerations; Disorders of the First Two Weeks of Age; Procedures; Drug Use; and Appendix of Normal Values. WEJ VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY: An Introduction By Ian Tizard; Third Edition (1987); Published by W. B. Saunders; 401 pages; $39.95 The author here is successful in his attempt to provide a text that demonstrates the scope of veterinary immun- ology in such a way that students and veterinarians can readily comprehend it, while at the same time appreciate its complexity. Busy practitioners will appreciate the au- thor's efforts to summarize and consolidate the huge amount of information available. Some of the more significant new information includes recent information on the role of the macrophages, dendritic cells and B cells in antigen presentation, structure of the T cell receptor, the functions of the interleukins and the func- tional role of the antigens of the major histocompatibility complex. The author says, "Few 'new' immunological diseases have appeared, although periodic opthalmia and equine polyneuritis have joined the ranks of undoubted auto- immune diseases, and the list of confirmed immuno- deficiency diseases of domestic animals continues to grow." Neuritis of the cauda equina, or equine polyneuritis, is described as "an uncommon condition of horses in which a polyneuritis affects the sacral and coccygeal nerves. Affected horses show paralysis of the tail, rectum and bladder with a localized anesthesia in the same region. Equine polyneuritis may also be associated with facial and trigeminal paralysis. Histologically, affected nerves are degenerate and infiltrated with mononuclear cells. Affected horses possess circulating antibodies to a protein found in peripheral myelin called P2. This same protein has been shown to be able to induce experimental allergic neuritis in laboratory rodents. It is therefore believed that an autoimmune attack on peripheral myelin is involved in the pathogenesis of equine polyneuritis." This book should be required background reading for any veterinarian who did not graduate last year. It is readable, well illustrated, and published in a handy, durable paperback form. WEJ Complete laboratory services • 16 years of experience .......................... ~ N~:~S~Q~ii~ ~'~:~i~ ~~ ~i~ ~a~ ~s~ ......................................... ~i~2)N~~ ~i:!~!:i:~:~:!~i~i:!i!~:i~i!!i~!:~!~:! i:!:i:~:~!i:i~!L.~`.:~.!&`.~.~.~.~:!:i.~:i.~!.i!i`~.~.;. :::""''::":''":"'::: ............... ~!: ................ :~iN~i~!D~M~:iP.~h~ :i:i :i:~ :i:i : i~i :i :i :~:~i!~:i~i!~:~M!i~:.~.`. : . :=~: . : . : . : . : .: .:=: . : ............ ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ........ :..LiiL ..... ii!!!~!!:: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ~I b l-as! uwen r,, t~arrloITHoaa Medical Lab SuiteE US 1-800-654-5117 (wait for tone thendialTEST) Animal Testing Division Enid, Oklahoma 73701 In Oklahoma 1-800-522-4140 (wait for tone, then dial T E S T) Rotary phone? Call us collect at (405) 233-2909 Volume 7, Number 3, 1987 177

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MANUAL OF EQUINE NEONATAL MEDICINE, By John E. Madigan; Published by Live Oak Publishing, P.O. Box 8329, Woodland, CA 95695 (1987); 364 pages;-paperback; $27.95.

This pocket sized book (4"X 7") is designed to be a manual for the practicing veterinarian who is doing work with foals and wants specific, accurate, practical easy to find current information in this rapidly developing area of neonatal medicine. The author defines neonates as foals less than two weeks of age.

As the author admits, this book is not a text, as such, "It should not be considered the final word nor be the limit of reading needed to be competent in the care of newborn foals. Current textbooks and review articles are available to provide background for those unfamiliar with procedures and drugs. Unfortunately, due to a lack of carefully controlled clinical trials done with foals we have'had to improvise and rely on other information in some instances. "

The outline form used extensively in the manual lends itself well to the purpose of the handbook. Information is easy to find and quick to digest.

The sections of the book are: Pregnant Mare, Foaling, and Post Birth; Nursing and Intensive Care Considerations; Disorders of the First Two Weeks of Age; Procedures; Drug Use; and Appendix of Normal Values. WEJ

VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY: An Introduction By Ian Tizard; Third Edition (1987); Published by W. B. Saunders; 401 pages; $39.95

The author here is successful in his attempt to provide a text that demonstrates the scope of veterinary immun- ology in such a way that students and veterinarians can

readily comprehend it, while at the same time appreciate its complexity. Busy practitioners will appreciate the au- thor's efforts to summarize and consolidate the huge amount of information available.

Some of the more significant new information includes recent information on the role of the macrophages, dendritic cells and B cells in antigen presentation, structure of the T cell receptor, the functions of the interleukins and the func- tional role of the antigens of the major histocompatibility complex. The author says, "Few 'new' immunological diseases have appeared, although periodic opthalmia and equine polyneuritis have joined the ranks of undoubted auto- immune diseases, and the list of confirmed immuno- deficiency diseases of domestic animals continues to grow."

Neuritis of the cauda equina, or equine polyneuritis, is described as "an uncommon condition of horses in which a polyneuritis affects the sacral and coccygeal nerves. Affected horses show paralysis of the tail, rectum and bladder with a localized anesthesia in the same region. Equine polyneuritis may also be associated with facial and trigeminal paralysis. Histologically, affected nerves are degenerate and infiltrated with mononuclear cells. Affected horses possess circulating antibodies to a protein found in peripheral myelin called P2. This same protein has been shown to be able to induce experimental allergic neuritis in laboratory rodents. It is therefore believed that an autoimmune attack on peripheral myelin is involved in the pathogenesis of equine polyneuritis."

This book should be required background reading for any veterinarian who did not graduate last year. It is readable, well illustrated, and published in a handy, durable paperback form. WEJ

Complete laboratory services • 16 years of experience

.......................... ~ N~:~S~Q~ii~ ~ ' ~ : ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ a ~ ~ s ~ ......................................... ~ i ~ 2 ) N ~ ~ ~i:!~!:i:~:~:!~ii~i:!iii!~:i~i!!i~!::~!~::!iiiii::!::i:~::::~!i::i~!L.~.:~..!&..~.~..~..~:!::i.....~:i..~!.i!i~.~....;. :::""''::":''":"'::: ............... ~!: ................ ::~iN~i~!D~M~::iP.~h~::::::::i::i::::::::iii::~::::i::ii::::iiii~i::::i::::i::::~::~i!~::i~i!~::~M!i~:..~.. :::..:=~:.:.:.:.:..:::.::=:....: ............ ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ........ :..LiiL.....ii!!!~!!::

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 ~I b l-as! uwen r,, t~arrloIT Hoaa

Medical Lab SuiteE US 1-800-654-5117 (wait for tone thendialTEST) Animal Testing Division Enid, Oklahoma 73701 In Oklahoma 1-800-522-4140 (wait for tone, then dial T E S T)

Rotary phone? Call us collect at (405) 233-2909

Volume 7, Number 3, 1987 177