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4. Food and Food Habits Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 28, No. 2 (Nov., 1959), pp. 406-407 Published by: British Ecological Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2103 . Accessed: 01/05/2014 15:27 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected]. . British Ecological Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal of Animal Ecology. http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 194.29.185.61 on Thu, 1 May 2014 15:27:11 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

4. Food and Food Habits

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4. Food and Food HabitsJournal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 28, No. 2 (Nov., 1959), pp. 406-407Published by: British Ecological SocietyStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2103 .

Accessed: 01/05/2014 15:27

Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

.JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected].

.

British Ecological Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal ofAnimal Ecology.

http://www.jstor.org

This content downloaded from 194.29.185.61 on Thu, 1 May 2014 15:27:11 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

Page 2: 4. Food and Food Habits

406 A bstracts

Bailey, R. (1959). Facultative parasitism and dietary change in Harmolita hyalipenne Walker. Nature, Lond. 183, 341-342.

Describes the ecological relationship between Harmolita grarninicola and H. hyalipenne in couch grass. The eggs of the former are laid close to the young galls. On hatching they give rise to active grubs which attack and destroy the gallicolous larvae of H. graminicola. This parasitism, however, is shown to be facultative, and the grubs may form typical galls.

Becker, P. (1958). Some parasites and predators of biting midges, Culicoides Latreille (Dipt., Ceratopogonidae). Ent. Mon. Mag. 94, 186-189.

Nereis diversicolor is probably a regular predator of Culicoides larvae. Parasites of the midges included species of bacteria, ciliata and acarina.

Burnett, T. (1958). A model of host-parasite interaction. Proc. 10th Imt. Congr. Ent., Montreal, 1956, 2, 679-686.

A study of Trialeurodes vaporariortun and its parasite Encarsia formosa over twenty-one generations in the laboratory shows that the population changes generally follow those calculated from the equations of Nicholson and Bailev.

Jackson, D. J. (1958). Observations on the biology of Caraphractus cinctus Walker (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), a parasitoid of the eggs of Dytiscidae. I. Methods of rearing and numbers bred on different host eggs. Trans. R. Ent. Soc. Lond. 110, 533-554.

Gives details of the distribution of this parasitoid in Britain, technique and methods of rearing from various Dytiscidae, behaviour and life history. Discusses superparasitism and its effect on sex ratio.

Jackson, D. J. (1958). Notes on some Nematodes and Trematodes infesting water beetles. Ent. Mon. Mag. 94, 109-1 1.

Identification and description of Nematode and Trematode eggs found on dissection of water beetles.

Jennings, A. R. (1959). Diseases of wild birds, fifth report. Bird Study, 6, 19-22. Of 247 birds examined post mortem between June 1957 and June 1958, fifty-four died of

infectious disease, 111 by accident and poison. Dieldrin seed dressings poisoned many birds, particularly wood pigeons.

Slykhuis, J. T. & Watson, M. A. (1958). Striate mosaic of cereals in Europe and its transmission by Delphacodes pellucida (Fab.). Ann. Appl. Biol. 46, 542-553.

Delphacodes pellucida was established as the vector of a virus disease on various gramina- ceous plants at Harpenden in 1956. The virus was transmitted through the eggs to as many as 88%// of the progeny of infected females.

4. FOOD AND FOOD HABITS

Baker, C. S. Wood- (1958). The oviparous female of Vesiculaphis theobaldi Tak. and notes on its food plants. (Hem., Aphididae). Ent. Mon. Mag. 94, 100-102.

An apterous female from colonies of V. theobaldi reared on Carex rertota and C. sylvatica was seen laying eggs.

Crichton, M. I. (1959). Attacks by birds on caddis flies. Bird Study, 6. 22-25. Distinctive nicking, often of both wings, of caddis flies taken in a light trap near Reading

suggests attack by birds when at rest.

Haggett, G. (1958). Larval food plants of some Noctuae. Entomologist, 91, 267. Larvae of five species have been found, sometimes consistently, on food-plants other than

those usually attributed to them. They are Lithacodia fasciana on Agrostis sp. in Suffolk; Euclidimera si on various grasses and Phragmites; Heliophobus saponariae on Ononis and other leguminous plants as well as Silene in the Breck; Melanchra persicariae on coniferous foliage; and Heliothis miaritirna septentrionalis on Calluna in the New Forest.

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Page 3: 4. Food and Food Habits

Migration, etc. 407

Hudleston, J. A. (1958). Some notes on the effects of bird predators on hopper bands of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria Forskal). Ent. Mon. Mag. 94, 210-214.

A list of birds seen feeding on locust hoppers is given, and the general effect of bird predation on hopper groups discussed.

Hueck, H. J. (1958). The development of a comparative method for the evaluation of the moth-proofness of wool serge. Ann. Appl. Biol. 46, 511-528.

Includes data on the weight losses of woollen serge from feeding by the common clothes moth (Tineola bisselliella).

Richards, T. J. (1958). Concealment and recovery of food by birds, with some relevant observations on squirrels. Brit. Birds, 51, 497-508.

Food-storing habits of coal tit, marsh tit, nuthatch, jay and rook are described. Grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) distribute buried food over their territories and recover it by scent. Of twenty-one items buried by the author between mid-October and December only four had not been removed by 31 January.

5. MIGRATION, INTRODUCTIONS AND LOCAL DISTRIBUTION

Aston, A. (1958). Additions to the Suffolk Lepidoptera. Ent. Rec. 70, 306. Dates and localities for nine of the forty-nine species added since the publication of the

county list in 1937.

Baynes, E. S. A. (1958). Supplement to a list of the Lepidoptera of Tory Island, Co. Donegal. Entomologist, 91, 207.

A list of nine additional species. (See 1957, Entomologist, 90, 310 and abstract in 1959, J. Anim. Ecol. 28, 182).

Brown, R. G. B., Ashmole, N. P. & Campbell, R. P. (1958). Insect migration in the Pyrenees in the autumn of 1955. Ent. Mon. Mag. 94, 217-226.

A report of insects seen migrating in the Gavarnie area of the Hautes Pyrenees. A list of species collected is given and the effect of weather upon migration discussed. The stronger fliers appear to fly over the main ridge in favourable weather, and are forced into the lower passes only by head winds.

Elkin, Hazel W. (1955). Whiting (Gadus merlangus L.) in Irish waters. Sci. Proc. Roy. Dub. Soc. 27, 17-30.

Comparative study of monthly samples of commercially caught whiting from the east and west coasts of Ireland taken over a period from November 1952 to June 1954.

Haggett, G. (1958). Rediscovery of the marsh carpet, Perizoma sagittata Fabricius, in Norfolk. Entomologist, 91, 231-232.

This moth, regarded as possibly extinct, was rediscovered in 1954 and was plentiful in 1956. Its sporadic appearance may be associated with the varying success of its food-plant (Thalictrum), which has lately both spread and increased. The seed heads, on which the larva feeds, are often infested by mildew and a disease causes the flowers and upper parts of the stem to blacken. Spiders, earwigs and predaceous Hemiptera frequent the seed heads and probably cause considerable mortality among the eggs and young larvae.

Healy, Ann (1956). Pike (Esox lucius L.) in three Irish lakes. Sci. Proc. Roy. Dub. Soc. 27, 51-63.

A comparative survey of the spawning times, growth rates, sex ratios and feeding habits of pike taken from Lough Glore, Lough Rea and Barnagrow lake in the years 1950-4.

Hollom, P. A. D. (1959). The great crested grebe sample census 1946-1955. Bird Study, 6, 1-7.

A consolidated report for the period indicated and comparison with data from previous censuses. After an increase in 1953 and 1954 to nearly 150% of 1931 populations, the figure fell to 1310% in 1955. Distribution within Britain is discussed.

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