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RBHraCaNacRkkm<úCa Cati sasna RBHmhakSRt CAMBODIAN MINE ACTION CENTRE Saving Lives and Supporting Development for Cambodia

 · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

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Page 1:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

RBHraCaNacRkkm<úCa Cati sasna RBHmhakSRt

CAMBODIAN MINE ACTION CENTRE

Saving Lives and Supporting Development for Cambodia

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008 OVERVIEW AND 2009 OUTLOOK 4. OPERATIONAL WORK PLAN

4.1 Landmine and UXO Clearance 4.2 Survey and Land Release 4.3 Landmine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction 4.4 Training, Research and Development in Mine Action

5. WORK PLAN BY PROJECTS 6. CORPORATE MANAGEMENT 7. RISK AND CONTINGENCY MANAGEMENT 8. ANNEXES

i

ii-iii

iv

v-ix

1-6

7-19

20-58

20-39

40-44

44-51

51-58

59-78

79-81

82-83

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Glossary

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GLOSSARY

ASEAN Association of South East Asian Nation

AP mine Anti-Personnel Mine

APMBT Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Treaty

AT mine Anti-Tank Mine

BAC Battle Area Clearance

BAT Battle area clearance Team

BAV Battle area clearance by village

BTB Battambang

CBMRR Community-Based Mine Risk Reduction

CBURR Community-Based UXO Risk Reduction

CBD Community-Based Demining Team

CCM Convention on Cluster Munitions

CIP Commune Investment Plan

CMAA Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority

CMAC Cambodian Mine Action Centre

CMC Community Mine Clearance

CMVIS Cambodia Mine Victim Information System

CSU Contractual Service Unit

DFP District Focal Point

DM Demining Machine

DU Demining Unit

EC European Commission

ECOSORN Economic and Social Relaunch of Northwest Provinces

EDD Explosive Detection Dog

EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal

ERO Eastern EOD Regional Office

EU European Union

GTC Global Training Centre

HI Handicap International

ICRC International Crescent and Red Cross

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Glossary

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JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency

JMAS Japan Mine Action Service

L1S Level One Survey (Impact Survey)

LLD Long Leash Dog

LUPU Land Use Planning Unit

LWF Lutheran World Federation

MAPU Mine Action Planning Unit

MAP Mine Action Planning

MAT Mine Awareness Team

MA-DWG Mine Action District Working Group

MDD Mine Detection Dog

MMT Mine Marking Team

MoEYS Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports

MP Mobile Platoon

MRE Mine/UXO Risk Education, or

Mine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction (Team)

MUC Mine/UXO Committee

NGO Non-Governmental Organization

PLA Participatory Learning and Action

PMAC Provincial Mine Action Committee

RGC Royal Government of Cambodia

SLD Short Leash Dog

SR Siem Reap

TC Training Centre

TS(T) Technical Survey (Team)

UNA-USA United Nation Association of United States of America

UNDP United Nations Development Program

UXO Unexploded Ordnance

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Foreword

FOREWORD 2008 has been another successful year for the Cambodian Mine Action Centre (CMAC). Productivity has remained high while CMAC has pressed on with innovating and adapting to the changing landscape of the mine action sector. CMAC has been forward thinking, placing emphasis on research and development, increasing the focus on battle area clearance, and continuing to strengthen the workforce through staff training and deminer savings plans. For the first time, CMAC recorded zero landmine/UXO deminer accidents all year. This came as a result of a heightened level of discipline, experience and conscious execution of demining and related work by all staff at all levels. Also, the national landmine and ERW casualty rate continued to decline. Zero deminer accidents and a decreasing national accident rate are good reason to celebrate, as victory over the hidden killer in Cambodia begins to come into view. In 2009 Mine Action in Cambodia is marked by the Article 5 deadline of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Treaty that Cambodia has been a state party to since 1999. Article 5 of this convention states all landmine areas must be identified and cleared within the 10 year life of the convention. This 2009 deadline could not be met. Therefore, Cambodia will request a 10 year extension from the international community this March. Looking to the future and supporting this treaty extension request are a new baseline ground survey and a 10 year National Strategic Plan. These are in development through CMAC collaboration with the Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority (CMAA) and other accredited demining operators. CMAC has a positive outlook for 2009 backed by the strong Integrated Work Plan that we are pleased to present to you here. We strongly believe that with the kind support from donors and partners CMAC will realize this work plan, and the budget shortfall highlighted in the work plan will be met. CMAC will continue to be one of the leaders, remain innovated and effective as a demining organization. In 2009 CMAC aims to clear 35km² of landmine and UXO contaminated area, all in the highest priority areas for the poorest Cambodian people. As it is evident that clearance alone will not solve Cambodia’s landmine and UXO problem within a decade, integration of the Technical Survey and Area Reduction approach into operations will be used to reduce 121km² of the Suspected Hazardous Area in 2009. We would like to take this opportunity to express thanks to the international community and our partners, PMAC/MAPU, local communities and authorities and the Royal Government of Cambodia, and finally to all our gracious donors whose generosity makes our work possible. The continued support to CMAC is highly appreciated, and we look forward to a successful productive year strive ahead in the mission of “Saving Lives and Supporting Development for Cambodia.” Approved by the Governing Council Meeting on 20 February 2009

Heng Ratana Director General Cambodian Mine Action Centre

Khem Sophoan Chairman of Governing Council Cambodian Mine Action Centre

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Executive Summary

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1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Landmines and Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) remain in Cambodia as a lethal legacy of the three decades of war and civil conflict lasting until as late as 1998. The National Landmine Impact Survey (L1S) completed in 2002 classified 4,466 km² of the country as a Suspected Hazardous Area (SHA) with 6422 villages (46.2% of all Cambodian villages) affected by landmines and Unexploded Ordinance (UXO). This has had a severe socio-economic impact on Cambodia. Although landmines and UXO incidents are decreasing; statistics produced by CMVIS1 show that that landmines/UXO still cause hundreds of casualties every year. Furthermore, contamination widely constrains productive use of land, perpetuating the cycle of poverty among the affected population. CMAC was created as a national institution to address this issue, with the mission of ‘Saving Lives and Supporting Development for Cambodia’. CMAC is carrying this out through 4 core activities2 outlined in detail in this Integrated Work Plan. The Kingdom of Cambodia has been a State Party to the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Treaty since 1999. Article 5 of this convention states all landmine areas must be identified and cleared within the 10 year life of the convention. Although much work has been done the problem remains extensive in Cambodia and the December 2009 deadline will not be met. Cambodia will request a 10 year extension from the international community. This, along with the focus on the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM) requires CMAC to continue its work proactively in demining and other ERW collection and destruction. CMAC will continue to innovate and improve wherever possible. Clearance productivity will continue to increase through the use of a diverse array of demining tools including manual, survey, landmine/UXO detection dog and mechanical demining, in order to release land for productive use and remove and destroy ERW more quickly and efficiently. Efforts for risk reduction will continue to be provided through directly working with affected communities, mine/UXO committee (MUC) networks and local authorities, school programs, scrap metal dealers and through mass media campaign. Addressing the landmine/ERW threat in Cambodia requires contributions by all stakeholders in the Mine Action sector. In close collaboration with the Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority (CMAA) and other accredited demining operators3, CMAC is working towards establishing a common baseline survey protocol to assess remaining risk as well as developing a strong National Demining

1 Red Cross Cambodian Mine Victim Information System 2 Landmine/UXO Awareness; Landmine Information and Survey; Landmine/UXO Clearance; Training in Landmine Action 3 CMAC, MAG, Halo Trust

UXO Found by DU4 Siem Reap in Preah Vihear Province

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Strategy. At operator level CMAC also requires a clear and aggressive strategy, and is in the final process of developing a rolling 5 year strategic plan for 2009-2013. This 2009 IWP details major goals including the clearance of approximately 355 minefields, or 361 development sites, with 35,135,500 m² of landmine contaminated area (minefields) and UXO contaminated area (UXO fields) in the highest priority areas. Key indicators include:

• Clear 27,179,500 m² of highly contaminated areas (minefield). • Clear approximately 7,956,000 m² of battlefield area (UXO field). • Respond to around 10,000 EOD calls for emergency interventions. • Destroy at least 132,000 pieces of UXO of all types. • Benefit some 14,000 families directly and 57,000 families indirectly as well as

approximately 14,400 students in 252 highly landmine/UXO contaminated villages. In overall terms approximately 228,000 people will benefit from the demining activities in 2009.

• Significantly contribute to further casualty reduction countrywide through both landmine and UXO clearance activities.

• Support livelihood, social, economic and infrastructure development of the post-clearance communities.

• Increase confidence of villagers using land they once feared. CMAC aims to achieve this using the best in class and most appropriate tools and methodologies, while combining humanitarian landmine/UXO clearance with contractual demining. This year better coordinating efforts with MAPU and private and development partners will be a focus. CMAC will also enhance its survey and land release approach and aims to reduce approximately 121 km² of Suspected Hazardous Area. Mine Risk Education (MRE) will continue to be provided in partnership with local community, UNICEF, and the education system. Local community capacity will be strengthened to address landmine/UXO risk reduction through the CBMRR/CBURR. Training, research and development will focus on further improving technology and methodology as well as enhancing staff and management capacity. Activities in 2009 will release land that will be utilized by the poorest communities in Cambodia for agriculture, infrastructure and resettlement and other purposes. To achieve the 2009 aims CMAC will deploy the following tools and teams:

• Demining platoons • Community based demining platoons (CBD) • Community mine clearance teams (CMC) • Landmine/UXO detection dogs (MDD/EDD) • Mechanical vegetation clearance machines (BC) • Explosive ordnance disposal teams (EOD) • Battle area clearance teams (BAC/BAT/BAV) • Explosive remnants of war clearance teams (ERC) • Mechanical demining machines (MD) • Technical and Baseline Survey teams (TSC) • Mine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction Team (MRER)

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Executive Summary

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ISO 9001:2000 vii

Each of these tools/teams is designed for a specific purpose, terrain and environment, and minefield and UXO field size and situation. These teams are appropriately equipped and staffed with experienced multi-skill trained personnel. Their deployment, when combined with good planning and appropriate task selection, will result in high productivity and teams make an important contribution to the overall IWP productivity target. CMAC detection dogs are perhaps the second biggest operation in the world. CMAC MDD teams are tasked to search for landmine as well as UXO. In 2009, 10 short leash MDD teams (4 dogs per team), 4 long leash MDD team (2 dogs per team) and 4 Explosive Detection Dog (EDD) teams (2 dogs per team) will be deployed. More dogs are in training. The MDD breeding program is in progress in close collaboration with GTC Bosnia. Also CMAC MDD has extended its service to support MAG demining operations in Cambodia and this relationship continues to strengthen. Over the last few years operations has seen an increase in EOD and ERW clearance capability, reflecting the changing trends in casualties, as the proportion of UXO victims to landmine victims rises. Demining teams have been retrained and converted to perform EOD and battle area clearance tasks to meet the rising demand (BAC/BAT/BAV). Complementing these intervention efforts is the CBURR/CBMRR tool to link the community needs with the intervention teams. EOD increased capacity also comes as a result of support to mineral exploration (BHP) and other like projects in future. Land Release capacity will be enhanced in 2009 as CMAC participates in the baseline survey process which will begin with around 20 most affected districts selected by CMAA in consultation with key operators. This baseline survey will be based on a common protocol developed jointly by the three accredited operators, CMAC, MAG and Halo Trust and CMAA. CMAC’s future land release effort will see release of more land from formerly suspected areas reported under the Level 1 Survey (pending CMAC submittal and CMAA endorsement of land release concept draft, supported by NPA and GICHD). It is expected that CMAC will continue strengthening its current MRE methodology and initiatives working with its key partner UNICEF dealing with issues related to scrap metal dealers (URSMD). The multi-skilled landmine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction teams (MRER) will continue allowing greater responsiveness to immediate needs. Efforts will continue at the community level with CBMRR/CBURR strengthening and expansion. The CBMRR will reach out with mine risk education and related services to 190,000 families living in landmine/UXO-affected areas across 230 villages, 83 communes, 25 districts and 6 provinces in the northwest part of the country. The CBURR will deploy 35 CBURR District Focal Points to cover highly UXO-affected districts in the southeastern provinces, conduct 2,400 UXO awareness briefings to an estimated 93,000 people and make 1,560 household

MDD –Long Leash was in Operations in Ratanak Mondul- Battambang

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Executive Summary

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visits reaching out to at least 1,560 families with UXO risk education while assessing their UXO response needs. More demining tool research is planned in 2009. CMAC is keen to embrace new technologies which help to speed up the demining process as they develop. Implementing new technologies and approaches has so far enabled CMAC to nearly triple its productivity from 8,369,635 m² in 2000 to 27, 652, 389 m² in 2008 with generally the same level of operational budget. With generous support from the Government and people of Japan many mechanical technologies have been tested and made operational, such as brush cutters and mechanical demining machines (Hitachi and Komatsu). In collaboration with the US Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining R&D Program testing of a dual sensor landmine detector ‘HSTAMIDS’ and operator training are in progress. Another important initiative both as ongoing research and in current operations is the Explosive Harvesting Program. This program has enabled CMAC to convert explosive from war munitions into the type of explosive used for humanitarian demining purpose and this supports CMAC, MAG and Halo Trust operations. The Training Centre equips CMAC personnel with the skills to do their work. In 2009, the CMAC Training Centre will deliver refresher and skill training courses. These will be attended by approximately 700 trainees throughout the year, strengthening the technical skills of the front line and middle management. With technical assistance from Japan, New Zealand and US, the CMAC Training Centre is working toward becoming a regional centre of excellent in training and research. Aside from operational activities, it will also be a challenging year for CMAC Corporate Management. There are major issues in 2009 confronting corporate management, from the Mine Ban Treaty extension request and adapting to a new national mine action strategy, to ensuring efficient and effective operations to sustaining funding and also maintaining the well being of CMAC workforce. A strong management team is in place to manage these challenges and will meet the major goal of delivering mine action service in a sound and professional manner in adherence with CMAC's core values. CMAC will have a medium and long term strategies and work plans. It will:

• Regularly monitor and evaluate organizational performance against work plans, perform timely reviews and adjust adopted strategies or develop new strategies to meet changing needs;

• Review and reform organizational structures at all levels when and where necessary to meet the needs of operational requirements and mine action changes;

GPS Training Class in Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

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• Continually improve internal management and control through sound internal policies, procedures and standard operations procedures (SOP's);

• Continue to strengthen the culture of responsibility and accountability at all levels; • Promote staff motivation through improved staff welfare, multi-skilling, and skill-based

job placement; and, • Improve coordination and collaboration with stakeholders, including donors,

development partners, national and international agencies, national and local authorities and grassroots communities to enhance exchange of information, planning and quality of service delivery.

Achieving the intended outputs is possible only with sufficient budgetary support. CMAC's total budgetary plan is over 21 million. Around 14 million is expected for operational budget and the remaining 7.2 million is for equipment and technical assistance in estimated terms. Of the 14 million expected to support operations, around 10.5 million has been confirmed based on the best available information at the time of preparing this work plan. However, this figure may change based when the final funding situation is confirmed. Therefore CMAC still has a budgetary shortfall of 3.55 million, which needs to be addressed. Of this, CMAC has submitted proposals to donors for 2.42 million to reduce the shortfall, and CMAC is still looking for new sources of funding to address the other 1.13 million. CMAC looks forward to a successful productive year reducing the number of lives lost to landmine/UXO accidents and releasing safe arable land for agriculture and also resettlement and infrastructure for the poorest communities in Cambodia. With the backing of gracious donor countries from across the globe CMAC will continue to innovate and strive ahead in the mission of “Saving lives and supporting development for Cambodia”.

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INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Background and Relevant Issues

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1

2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 2.1 Background Landmines and other unexploded ordinance (UXO) remain within Cambodia as a lethal legacy of three decades of war and civil conflict which continued in some parts of the country until as late as 1998. As a result, Cambodia became one of the most heavily landmine/UXO contaminated countries in the world. To quantify this problem, the National Landmine Impact Survey (LIS), completed in April 2002, surveyed a total of 13,908 Cambodian villages, represented an estimated 11,460,661 persons and covered a surface area of 4,466 km2. From this survey it was found there were 2,497 distinct areas suspected of being contaminated by landmines, UXO, and cluster munitions, encompassing a total of 6,422 (46.2% of all) Cambodian villages. The degree to which these contaminated villages were affected was rated as: 23.7% very severe, 24.2% severe and 52.1% less severe. Important to note is that whether there is a single landmine or a thousand, the ability to confidently use the land is compromised and people suffer. Since 1994 the Cambodian Red Cross has overseen the Cambodia Mine/UXO Victim Information System (CMVIS), a database of information pertaining to Landmine/UXO casualties within the country. The following is the casualty data recorded over the last almost twelve years:

Mine/UXO Casualty Rate in Cambodia

0

1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

Year

Min

e/U

XO C

ausl

ties

Map of Mine Contaminated Area in Cambodia

Map of UXO Contaminated Area in Cambodia

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The recent drop (by almost 50%) in the number of casualties in 2006 (to 450 cases) along with a continued decline in 2007/08 is a positive sign, indicative of the dedication of the many stakeholders involved in the landmine action (MA) sector. Despite this positive progress, the number of casualties remains very high, and sees Cambodia still ranked amongst the most landmine affected countries worldwide, particularly worse off than neighboring countries which shared involvement in many of its conflicts. Thus the declining casualty rate should be used as a motivating factor around which the sector can rally, to develop new programs and build capacity within the existing national framework to aid the Royal Government of Cambodia to meet its target of a zero-victim state by the year 2012. CMAC was initially established under the auspices of the U.N. Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC)1 during the transitional war to peace period to contribute to eradicating this threat. Over the past 16 years, CMAC has evolved from its initial establishment into a respectable national institution recognized for its excellence nationally and internationally. Its early mandate was largely focused on ‘achievement of short term objective general to the realization of immediate peace-consolidation tasks’2. In practical terms this meant to allow safe return for thousands of refugees to their homeland from refugee camps near Thailand border. CMAC’s mission then was ‘to achieve an atmosphere in Cambodia where people are free of the threat of mines and UXO, thus allowing reconstruction and development activities to take place in a safe environment’. To achieve this early mission, CMAC defined and executed four main programs: landmine awareness, landmine field information, landmine and UXO clearance and training in landmine clearance. The early mission was later refined in 2000 to ‘Saving Lives and Supporting Development for Cambodia’. 2.2 Issues Relevant to Landmine Action 2.2.1 Cambodia's Commitment to Landmine Action As mine action in Cambodia evolves, so did the landmine/UXO related national legislation, policies and guidelines. This included the Sub-decree to establish the CMAA in 2000 and its subsequent amendments as the regulatory body; the promulgation of the Law prohibiting the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction in 1999; the establishment of policies and operational guideline on Socio-Economic Management of Landmine Clearance in 2004; and many other landmine/UXO related strategies and initiatives. Also, recognizing the strategic importance of minimizing impacts created by landmine and ERW, the Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) has included landmine action concerns into its development goals and strategies. The Cambodian Millennium Development Goals, the 5 year National Socio-Economic Development Plan 2006-10 and the RGC rectangular strategy all include landmine action component. Cambodia is also a State Party to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on their Destruction otherwise known as the

1 Cambodian Landmine Action Center (CMAC) was created under the auspices of the U.N. Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC). In Annex 1 of the Paris Peace Agreement for UNTAC mandates called for assistance in clearing mines, undertaking training programs in landmine clearance and a landmine awareness program to help educate the Cambodian people. CMAC Governing Council, National Landmine Action Institution: The Cambodian Landmine Action Center (http://maic.jmu.edu/journal/5.1/Focus/CMACMouly/cmacmouly.htm), viewed 16 January 2009 2 GICHD, Landmine Action: Lessons and Challenges, 2005

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Ottawa Convention or Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Treaty (APMBT). This treaty came into effect in Cambodia on 1 January 2000. 2.2.2 Article 5 Extension Request The Article 5 of the Ottawa Convention aforementioned calls for a State Party to identify all mined areas and clear these areas within the 10 year life of the Convention. For Cambodia this is due on 31 December 2009. With that deadline fast approaching, and with an extensive landmine problem still remaining, The RGC will request from the international community for another 10 years. Preparation of the extension request is underway and the RGC is working toward the March 2009 formal submission. It is expected that in December 2009 the submission will be formally considered at the Second Five-Year Review Conference of the APMBT. Vital to this request is a sound and unified national landmine action strategy. The strategy will reflect the challenges faced by the demining sector particularly to maintain donor support for landmine clearance and how to direct the use of scarce demining resources toward clearing land over the next ten years to meet the Article 5 obligation. Addressing the new national landmine action ‘Article 5 extension focused’ strategy will be challenging and will require changes. The strategic adjustment may result in changes to demining priorities, alterations to the current landmine action planning regime, and will require provision of clear communication and guidance to all stakeholders (local communities and authorities, government agencies, donors and development partners) across the landmine action sector and beyond. In assisting the RGC to prepare for Cambodia’s Article 5 Extension Request, the Landmine Clearance Technical Reference Group3 met on 3-5 November 2008. During this meeting it was agreed that the starting point of a new national landmine action strategy should be a baseline survey in highly landmine-affected districts to quantify with reasonable accuracy the remaining landmine problem in Cambodia. It was agreed a common baseline survey protocol (CMAS) will be used by all 3 accredited demining operators4. This survey will demonstrate levels of operational standardization never before achieved in Cambodia amongst operators and strengthen the Article 5 extension bid; moreover it will assist operators in prioritizing clearance tasks paving the way toward meeting the Treaty obligation more effectively. 2.2.3 The Baseline Survey This new baseline survey will be conducted by teams of trained professional in accordance with the standard set under the CMAA survey protocol (CMAS) and operators own SOPs. Survey teams will conduct the survey as comprehensively and systematically as possible in all villages and communes in its CMAA assigned target districts. Operators need to quickly mobilize and equip their survey teams and standardize their own survey procedure inline with the survey CMAS. Training for teams will be key for effective survey execution. Teams include field survey teams, QA team, database unit and survey management team. Quality assurance (QA) at every step of the process will be exercised internally by the operator QA team and externally by CMAA, thus insuring adherence to standards.

3 Landmine Clearance Technical Reference Group: CMAC, MAG, Halo Trust, CMAA, UNDP, NPA 4 CMAC, Halo Trust, MAG. The protocol is in its final development as of January 2009 coordinated by the CMAA

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The findings of this survey will enhance efficient task prioritization and effective landmine action intervention. It is hoped these steps will maintain donor interest and support for demining in Cambodia in order for the country to reach the Article 5 extension mandate. The survey’s findings will supersede landmine area information registered under the L1S and other previous technical survey performed by all operators. The protocol will classify survey areas into 3 classifications (A: Landmine Area, B: Residual Threat, C: End State Land) according to the level of threat. The baseline survey will support land release. In many cases after close baseline survey of land once classified as suspected will be able to be reclassified as Class C and released. 2.2.4 The Land Release Concept The 4,466 km2 of land area reported by L1S as suspected to be landmine/UXO contaminated offers some indication of the size and location of hazardous areas, but its information is not precise enough to effectively target demining tasks and may encompass many areas which are in fact risk free. In the past with limited attempts to conduct assessment to reduce the L1S outputs to a more proximate landmine area, the alternative option chosen was to clear a larger suspected area, often resulting in only a few hazardous items found and in some cases none. This safe option is in fact not an efficient use of clearance resources. Moreover, the pressure for land needed for development and farming has resulted in massive clearance of suspected areas by villagers and developers; many parts of these areas have been in productive use for many years without landmine/UXO incident, however the areas need to officially be assessed and if appropriate released. Hence a more effective survey methodology was needed to accurately pinpoint hazardous areas and to release risk free areas. Operators such as CMAC, MAG and Halo Trust have been implementing this initiative on their own to various degrees. However, with the national urgency for land release at its climax, a national standardized land release policy needed development and execution. With technical assistance from NPA and GICHD over the last year, CMAC is now in a final phase of refining its 2006 land release protocol (formally SOP for technical survey). This will be CMAC’s augmented contribution the national policy on land release, providing an innovative method to release land without having to fully clear all suspected areas. Moreover, this newly revised protocol will complement the national baseline survey CMAS to be soon finalized by the CMAA. This is another positive and challenging step forward in the landmine action sector and indeed at CMAC. Another policy and operational challenges confronting CMAC and other operators is addressing the threat of ERW including cluster munitions. Their presence has continued to harm and cause suffering to civilians long after hostilities have ended. In Cambodia impacts of cluster munitions use over three decades of war have been felt mostly in the Cambodia south-eastern provinces bordering Vietnam - Kandal, Kampong Cham, Prey Veng, Svay Rieng and Takeo provinces.

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2.2.5 Cluster Munitions Treaty International advocacy against cluster munitions has increased in the last few years with the establishment of the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM). The CCM convention was adopted in Dublin by 107 states on 30 May 2008. 94 of those states have signed the Convention during the Signing Conference in Oslo on 3 – 4 December 2008. The CCM Convention is now open for all states to sign at the United Nations headquarters in New York5. It prohibits all use, stockpiling, production and transfer of Cluster Munitions. Separate articles in the CCM Convention concern assistance to victims, clearance of contaminated areas and destruction of stockpiles. After signing a 10-year deadline comes into place for all cluster munitions held to be cleared and destroyed. This is likely to impact the landmine action environment, priority and funding scenario, with more attention focused on cluster munitions, extra funding will likely be channeled to ERW efforts which may result in change to funding for demining. Although Cambodia has not yet become a CCM signature State, CMAC has been directly addressing the threat posed by cluster munitions as part of its Explosive Remnant of War (ERW) clearance initiative (ERW Intervention and ERW Clearance) and through its Community UXO Risk Reduction initiative (CBURR). This will continue with increasing pace in this coming year through CMAC’s proactive introduction of Battle Area Clearance (BAC) initiative. 2.2.6 New Challenges in the New Year Year 2009 will be a time of transition for the Landmine Action sector in Cambodia. Traditional full clearance alone cannot solve Cambodia’s landmines and other UXO problems. New ways of thinking and new strategies are beginning to be incorporated as the sector evolves with the aim of fast and safe land release. Efforts to achieve higher clearance outputs and faster and safer land release promote the introduction of new and more innovative technology in the landmine action sector and particularly at CMAC. In the last few years, pressure by the need of land for agriculture development, many suspected landmine areas were reclaimed regardless of their potential mine/UXO risk. This land has changed physically, vegetation has been removed; crops have been cultivated. New technology and new methodology are needed to also adapt to the changing environment. CMAC also needs to response to changes.

5 The Convention of Cluster Munitions: http://www.clusterconvention.org/, viewed on 16 January 2009

Cluster Munitions found in a rice field of Kampong Cham Province by JAIF Project at ERO Officer in Kampong Cham

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At a strategic level CMAC continues to monitor and adapt to changes well. However change management is a challenge that must be considered through all levels of the organization. Training supports change management and success of new innovations. The challenge that CMAC faces is ensuring that its field managers and field staff are more responsive to environment. Development of management skill at middle management and officer level as well as the on-going multi-skill development for other rank and file staff is a key for addressing future changes. Another challenge in the sector is the increasingly high staff retention. CMAC has experienced this for last few years. Many if not most deminers have been in the field for around 15 years. Demining is a dangerous, slow and monotonous process and labor intensive. After years of landmine clearance work, deminers have felt increasing work related fatigue, family and socio-economic pressure. CMAC Senior Management team is mindful of this situation, and aware of the challenge faced in addressing this problem going forward in order that CMAC cares for its staff and continues to retain its strong operational capability. Obviously the most chronic challenge continues to be the ‘funding issue’. This is affecting all operators. It is anticipated that in 2009 and future years clearance productivity needs to be progressively increased in order to meet the Article 5 extension obligation. To meet the mounting requirements the level of funding needs to keep pace. It is hoped and anticipated that the successful bid for Article 5 extension will lead to sustained funding support for clearance operations. However, as a proactive organization, CMAC will be innovative and persistent in fund raising campaign. CMAC will continuously strive to be ever transparent, accountable and as effective as possible in the use of its funding resources. In addressing future organizational and operational needs, the CMAC five year strategic plan 2009-2013 is currently in the final draft phase. It is being developed in close consultation with staff and partners and will be the CMAC road map for the future. This plan considered all challenges aforementioned and also took into account areas which were uncovered during the recent organizational SWOT analysis and subsequent contributions to embrace a continued efficient and effective landmine action program in Cambodia. This year Cambodia is formulating an innovative 10 year strategic plan to commence in 2010. The valued continued support from donors is critical to put this plan to action and end the lethal legacy of mines and UXO.

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3. 2008 OVERVIEW AND 2009 OUTLOOK 3.1 2008 OVERVIEW 3.1.1 Operational Progress Up-to-Date As a leading demining organization in Cambodia, CMAC continues to make every effort to increase its demining productivity to release as much land as possible back to the community for productive use. From 1992 to December 2008 CMAC achieved the following operational outputs:

• Cleared 227,368,336 m² of contaminated land (227.4 km²). • Found and destroyed 405,023 anti-personnel mines. • Found and destroyed 7,657 anti-tank mines. • Found and destroyed 1,370,028 UXO’s, • Found 45,243 kg of small calibers, and • Unearthed 402,769,552 fragments, presenting enormous obstacles to demining activities.

In respect to the clearance progress in 2008, as of December CMAC achieved as follows:

• Cleared 27,653,389 m² of contaminated land. • Found and destroyed 25,709 anti-personnel mines. • Found and destroyed 497 anti-tank mines. • Found and destroyed 114,101 UXOs, • Found 7,001 kg of small calibers, and • Unearthed 19,874,891 fragments.

It should be noted that the progress made in 2008 is a little short compared to the target set for the year (29.7 km²). This is due the massive training CMAC conducted in 2008 to provide the demining staff with multi-skills including basic and advanced EOD, battle area clearance (including SOP's and use of UXO detectors), navigation, and mapping (including the use of GPS), minefield management and community liaison. These training courses were designed to prepare CMAC demining force to respond to the challenges they would face in the coming years to come in the new landmine action environment. The result from this training is expected to yield positive results in the years to come, especially the way

Total Area Cleared by Year (m²)

05000000

1000000015000000200000002500000030000000

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

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3.1.2 The Projects Implemented in 2008 The following projects were implemented in 2008: No Project Locations Donor/Partner Remarks

1 UNDP "Clearing for Results"

DU1, DU2, DU4, ERO

Multi-donor (Australia, Canada, AAM, Spain)

Clearing for Results in Banteay Meanchey, Battambang, Preah Vihear, Kampong Thom and eastern provinces

2 NPA (Netherlands) DU1, DU2 Netherlands Project to support and enhance technical survey in Battambang and Siem Reap

3 Austcare DU1 Australia Integrated demining and development in Banteay Meanchey

4 Japan-Grassroots DU2 Japan Humanitarian demining in Battambang 5 Japan-JMAS DU2 Japan Community-based demining in Battambang 6 US-DU3 DU3 USA Humanitarian demining in Pailin and Samlot

7 Japan-Grassroots DU4 Japan Humanitarian demining in Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear

8 Peaceboat DU4 Peaceboat School construction in Preah Vihear

9 Germany-DU6 DU6 Germany Humanitarian demining in Siem Reap and Oddar Meanchey

10 ECOSORN DU1, DU2, DU4 EC Integrated demining and development in north-

west provinces (ECOSORN Project) 11 Japan-JMAS ERO, HQ Japan EOD, CBURR

12 Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund DU1, ERO Japan Humanitarian demining in Banteay Meanchey and

EOD activities in eastern provinces 13 LMI CSU LMI Mineral Exploration in Ratanak Kiri 14 BHP Billiton CSU BHP Billiton Mineral Exploration in Mondul Kiri 15 PGS CSU PGS Mineral Exploration around Tonle Sap Lake 16 UNICEF All DU's UNICEF MRE, CBMRR

17 Explosive Harvesting Program HQ,TC USA R&D in explosive harvesting

18 MAG (MDD) DU2, DU3, DU4 MAG Renting of CMAC's MDD teams for MAG

operations 19 GTC (MDD) HQ, TC Sweden Provision of MDD and technical assistance 20 GEJ: Good Earth Japan DU2 Hitachi Post-clearance development 21 JMAS-CMAC DU2 Komatsu Community-Integrated development (CID) 22 R&D Project Phase II DU2 Japan Integration trial of demining machines 23 Technical Cooperation HQ Japan/JICA Provision of technical advisor

Total Projects 2008: 23 Note: this does not include Japanese Grant Aid Phase V which has been in process. Minutes of Discussion has been signed between CMAC and JICA.

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3.1.3 Teams Deployed in 2008

MONTH TS5 MP SLD LLD EDD CMC CBD DM BC MRE EOD TS10 TSC CBM CBU BAC

January 36 10 4 4 16 5 23 6 27 4 19 26 36

February 36 10 4 4 16 5 23 6 28 4 19 26 36

March 35 10 4 4 16 5 3 23 6 28 4 19 26 36

April 4 35 10 4 4 16 5 3 23 6 28 2 19 26 36

May 4 35 10 4 4 16 5 3 23 6 28 2 19 26 36

June 4 35 10 4 4 16 5 3 23 6 28 2 19 26 36

July 4 34 10 4 4 13 5 4 24 6 25 2 19 26 37 8

August 4 34 10 4 4 13 5 4 24 6 25 2 19 26 37 8

September 4 34 10 4 4 13 5 4 24 6 25 2 19 26 37 8

October 4 34 10 4 4 13 5 4 23 6 25 2 19 26 37 8

November 4 34 10 4 4 13 5 4 23 6 26 2 19 26 41 8

December 4 31 10 4 4 13 5 1 23 6 26 2 19 26 41 8

Note: CBM: CBMRR; CBU: CBURR 3.1.4 Zero Deminer Accidents The operations year of 2008 has been positively marked by high productivity and zero accidents to deminers. This is the first time in its history that there is no accident/incident to deminers. This also highlights CMAC's commitment to safety, which is one of the inner core values of demining activities. There are many challenges of course faced by CMAC's deminers on the ground. These challenges include booby traps, challenging terrain, sensitivity of old and damaged mines, complicated AP mines such as 72 types, etc. However, CMAC's deminers overcame these challenges very well in the past year. 3.1.5 Funding Even though it was expected at the beginning of the year that there would be a shortfall of budget for 2008, the actual fiscal year went quite smoothly. CMAC, thanks to the continued support and commitment from donors and partners, managed to sustain a reasonable funding level to support its operations. There were two main factors which addressed the financial concerns CMAC had at the beginning of the year:

• The increased funding by the Japanese Government through the Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund, which provided nearly 2 million USD (more than 1 million goes to operational costs) to support demining activities in DU1 Banteay Meanchey and ERW activities in eastern provinces. In addition, new projects also contributed to the financial sustainability in 2008. New projects in 2008 included NPA to support technical survey and land release, Research

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and Development Phase II, and CMAC-JMAS Community Integrated Development project supported by Komatsu Ltd.

• CMAC's commitment to cost-efficiency. Measures were taken to ensure that increased productivity was achieved without increasing resources. Efforts were made to effectively control the management of resources, including cost management and field operational management.

3.1.6 Multi-Skill Training 2008 has been a year of massive training for CMAC. Recognizing that multi-skills are very important for deminers to perform their duties effectively, especially in the changing landmine action environment, CMAC conducted three training courses for a total of 650 trainees at the Training Centre during 2008 offering them operational skills including basic and advanced EOD, battle area clearance (including SOP's and use of UXO detectors), navigation, and mapping (including the use of GPS), minefield management and community liaison. These trainees upon completing their study will add substantial value to the demining operations in terms of speed, techniques and experience as well as diversity of functions in the field. 3.1.7 Technical Survey and Land Release Project Full clearance alone cannot solve Cambodia’s landmine and UXO problems. Area Reduction (AR) performed by the Technical Survey Teams (TST) is a promising technique to increase the rate of land release in Cambodia. This approach is earning more and more attention as the shift in demining strategy continues. CMAC will utilize this technique increasingly going forward and looks to perfect best practice as much as possible and revisit and enhance this SOP in line with the organizational strategy and culture of continuous improvement which sees CMAC as a leader in the Landmine Action sector. In 2008, CMAC and NPA worked together on a technical survey and land release project to assist Cambodia to better quantify the actual landmine and UXO problems in high priority and high impact areas and accelerate area reduction. For this project, CMAC established a land release expert group to work on the new land release concept which has seen a further improvement to the survey concept and the development of a new land release protocol based on IMAS and international best practices. This land release document is expected to be the core document adopted by the Government and will provide useful guidance for landmine action practice in the future. 3.1.8 Transition of Demining Unit 3 CMAC started to deploy its resources to Pailin (Demining Unit 3 area of operations) under the support of the US Government in 2001 and later on the US extended this support to cover Samlot District of Battambang Province. This support has so far covered a humanitarian landmine action program focusing on clearing landmines, delivering landmine/UXO risk education, conducting technical survey and landmine marking as well as providing technical, field management and leadership training to improve the management of demining activities in DU 3. With a trend of reduced landmine casualties while the number of casualties caused by ERW (UXO) still persistently fluctuates and is expectedly on the rise, CMAC and its DU3 donor wished to see an

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increased intervention to UXO in the current coverage areas and a potential expansion of this intervention to neighboring districts as well as to other parts of the country. To realize this commitment, the US Government has allocated substantial amount of funding resources to train CMAC deminers in new skills to deal with EOD and BAC tasks. A transition plan has been developed and put in place to achieve the training objectives, formation of Battle Area Clearance Teams (BAC1), teams’ deployment, and eventual transition of DU 3 from sole mine clearance to cover UXO clearance as well. This evolution is a gradual transition which is taken take place from September 2008 to August 2009. 3.1.9 Research and Development of Landmine Clearance Related Equipment Phase II The testing of mechanical demining machine during phase I focused on the performance, survivability, mobility, maintenance/repair and acceptance of the machine. It was carried out from April until December 2006 at landmine contaminated provinces Siem Reap and Battambang. However, upon the arrival of the machines in Siem Reap, Cambodia, one of the manufacturers, Kawasaki, requested to withdraw from the project due to the technical difficulties it faced, leaving only three machines from two manufacturers to participate: Komatsu (1 machine) and Yamanashi Hitachi (2 machines). The result of the evaluation of these three machines shown that all three machines achieved high degree of efficiency in clearing AP mines at different depths, different soil types in the different environment. The shortcoming of these machines had also been identified and a recommendation for each machine had also been specified in the test report. After the completion of the R&D phase I, all three demining machines were sent to Japan to be modified/upgraded according to the recommendation mentioned in the phase I report. Memorandum of agreement on the project for research and development of landmine clearance related equipment in Cambodia (Phase II) was signed between CMAC represented by H.E Heng Ratana, former Deputy Director General and the Representatives from the abovementioned two companies on 2nd November 2007. These demining machines were designed to sustain AP landmine blast. Anti-Tank (AT) explosion will damage the machine and threaten the safety of the operator. In this test, both machines from Hitachi machines: Push type and Swing type hit AT mines. Both drivers were safe and machines sustained damage to its attachment. They were back in operation after repairs which were done on site. The machines have great performance in clearance minefield. Their performances are higher than the requirement stated in the CMAC’s SOR. Demining productivity generated by one of these machines equal at least to the demining output of one of CMAC manual platoon equipped with metal detector. The quality of their clearance is widely accepted by the local people.

1 BAC operations involve the location and disposal of ERW, including UXO and Abandoned Explosive Ordnance (AXO), over specific areas, which may include battlefields, defensive positions and sites where air delivered or artillery munitions have been fired or dropped. Depending on the humanitarian priorities and required land use, BAC may involve surface and sub-surface clearance. The requirement for BAC can be in both urban and rural environments.

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Demining Machine: Komatsu machine (Komatsu)

Demining machine: Push Type (Hitachi) Demining machine: Swing Type (Hitachi) 3.1.10 HSTAMIDS Training HSTAMIDS is an American made dual sensor landmine detector that would first detect metallic object using metal detector in its search head and then analyze the suspected metallic object by using its sensor. Its test was performed jointly between the CMAC research team and its American counterpart in Siem Reap (performance and SOP training at newly constructed test lanes within DU 4 compound) and Battambang. The test started from June 2008 and will continue into 2009. CMAC is still collecting more data, conducting analysis of these data to evaluate the performance of this detector, and developing appropriate SOP's to utilize the detector in field operations. It is highly expected that HSTAMIDS would contribute greatly to speeding up landmine clearance operation in Cambodia. 3.1.11 The Puppy Program Since 2000, canine landmine-detection teams have been used in Cambodia in four of the worst contaminated provinces. Currently, there are 56 dogs in the field using semi-trained dogs from Europe. In the past, CMAC attempted to turn local dogs into landmine detectors. It sent 10 prospect dogs to Sweden for training. CMAC learned that even though the Cambodian canines learned how to detect landmines, the effort eventually failed as these dogs turned to their old behaviours and had difficulty

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trusting their handlers upon return to Cambodia. Since then, CMAC has imported semi-trained dogs and provided them with full training in Cambodia before they become landmine/UXO detection dogs. Acknowledging that the costs of importing semi-trained dogs are high while the budget to support this activity is expectedly shrinking, CMAC has been working on a new solution to the issue: breeding its own dogs. The new puppies were born in March 2008, the offspring of proven landmine detection dogs. They were the first litter of 10 landmine detection dogs born in Southeast Asia. Their parents, November and Frode, are Malinois shepherds from Bosnia. Unfortunately, seven of the 10 puppies died from canine Pravovirus, which affects the intestinal tract. The setback, however, will not deter CMAC from developing its dog breeding program. To compensate for the loss, GTC in Bosnia has provided 10 new puppies to CMAC to be trained with the remaining 3. Training of these puppies started immediately after they were born. With the program up and running and some further investment, CMAC expects to run and manage the first landmine detection dog breeding program in south-east Asia and this is expected to benefit Cambodia and the region greatly. 3.1.12 The EDD Single Search Trial As part of its continued and strong commitment to improving the operational procedures and boosting productivity, CMAC has conducted a trial on EDD single search operations, which will see innovative ways of using the Explosive Detection Dogs in the UXO fields. This trial started in late 2008 and will continue into 2009 to assess the performance and outputs as well as costs associated. Early results indicate that this is a promising method of using EDD in UXO contaminated areas and this innovative way will boost productivity significantly without compromising with quality and safety. 3.2 2009 OUTLOOK 3.2.1 Article 5 Extension Request As a State Party of the Anti Personnel Landmine Ban Treaty, The Kingdom of Cambodia has an obligation under the Treaty’s Article 5 to ensure the destruction of all anti-personnel mines in mined areas under its jurisdiction or control. The treaty states this should happen as soon as possible and no later than ten years after the treaty came into effect, which for the Kingdom of Cambodia is by 31 December 2009. With that deadline fast approaching and an extensive landmine problem still remaining, the RGC will request for an extension2. Vital to this request is a sound, unified national landmine action strategy. This strategy should reflect the challenges faced by the demining sector in order to maintain donor support for landmine clearance, to direct the effective use of scarce demining resources toward clearing land over the next ten years and to meet the Article 5 obligation. The CMAA is leading this process, CMAC and other accredited operators are key contributors assisting CMAA in the development of the extension request.

2 Extension is 10 years

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Addressing the new national landmine action ‘Article 5 extension focused’ strategy will start with a new baseline survey. The results of this survey will affect demining priority, thus altering the current Landmine Action Planning regime. All key stakeholders including PMAC/MAPU, affected communities and demining operators will need to adapt themselves to the new strategy. New guidelines and training support are needed from the CMAA to support this. CMAC is fully prepared to adapt to this new challenge; its planned clearance and technical survey/area reduction efforts are indicators of its readiness to contribute. 3.2.2 Movement on Cluster Munitions: the Oslo Convention and its Impact The United Nation Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) states that Cluster Munitions have been used in combat in at least 21 countries, at least 73 countries stockpile them - with worldwide stockpiled sub-munitions in the billions3. Their use results in civilian death and suffering during and post conflict and contributing to serious and long lasting humanitarian and socio-economic impact. Cambodia has been affected greatly by cluster munitions, impacts have been felt mostly in its south-eastern provinces, Kandal, Kampong Cham, Prey Veng, Svay Rieng and Takeo. International advocacy against Cluster Munitions has increased in the last few years with the establishment of the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM). The CCM convention was adopted in Dublin by 107 states on 30 May 2008. 94 of those states have signed the Convention during the Signing Conference in Oslo on 3 – 4 December 2008. The CCM Convention is now open for all states to sign at the United Nations headquarters in New York4. It prohibits all use, stockpiling, production and transfer of Cluster Munitions. Separate articles in the CCM Convention concern assistance to victims, clearance of contaminated areas and destruction of stockpiles. Although Cambodia has not yet become a CCM signatory state, CMAC has been directly addressing the threat posed by Cluster Munitions as part of its UXO clearance initiative (Explosive Remnant of War Intervention and Explosive Remnant of War Clearance) and through its Community UXO Risk Reduction initiative (CBURR). This will continue with increasing pace in this coming year through the CMAC introduction of its BAC initiative. 3.2.3 Baseline Survey In assisting the RGC to prepare for the Cambodia’s Article5 Extension Request, the Landmine Clearance Technical Reference Group5 met on 3-5 November 2008. During the meeting it was agreed that the starting point of a new national landmine action strategy needed to be a baseline survey in highly landmine-affected districts to quantify with reasonable accuracy the remaining landmine problem in Cambodia. A common baseline survey protocol (CMAS) will be used by all accredited demining operators6. This survey will demonstrate levels of operational standardization never before achieved in Cambodia amongst operators and strengthen the Article 5 extension bid; moreover it will assist operators in prioritizing clearance tasks paving the way toward meeting the Treaty obligation more effectively.

3 Cluster Munitions in Albania and Lao PDR, the Humanitarian and Socio-Economic Impact, UNIDIR, 2006 4 The Convention of Cluster Munitions: http://www.clusterconvention.org/, viewed on 16 January 2009 5 Landmine Clearance Technical Reference Group: CMAC, MAG, Halo Trust, CMAA, UNDP, NPA 6 CMAC, Halo Trust, MAG. The protocol is in its final development as of January 2009 coordinated by the CMAA

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The baseline survey will be conducted by teams of trained professionals in accordance with the standard set under the survey protocol and CMAC’s own SOPs. CMAC survey teams will conduct a survey as systematically and comprehensively as possible in all villages and communes in the CMAA assigned target districts. Other demining tools will be employed when deemed necessary to support the survey process. Physical verification is needed to ensure accuracy and reliability of information and quality assurance at every step of the process will be exercised internally by the CMAC quality assurance team and externally by CMAA, thus insuring adherence to standards. This survey’s findings will supersede landmine area information provided under the L1S and other previous technical survey performed by all operators. The survey will reclassify land areas into 3 main and distinct landmine and ERW classifications, classification A (Landmine Area), classification B (Residual Threat), and classification C (End State Land). In each of the 3 classifications, there are 3 sub-classifications ranked according to the level and type of threat; they are very useful to assist operators and the affected communities in clearance task prioritization. CMAC in this coming year is taking a leading role in conducting baseline survey with 16 districts targeted. Building on the experience of its existing Technical Survey teams, CMAC will expand its survey capacity, reform and retrain its teams to meet this national requirement timely. A proposal has been submitted to the UNDP for this purpose; if succeed in its entirety, CMAC will be able to achieve the following objectives:

• Complete baseline survey in 16 high priority districts determined by CMAA within 12 months of the project period;

• Acquire accurate and reliable mined area information to support the article 5 extension request and future landmine clearance plans to meet the obligation of the Landmine Ban Treaty; and,

• Contribute to release of land once suspected as contaminated areas for productive use. Achieving the above objective, CMAC plans to deploy the following teams:

• 8 baseline survey teams, fully retrained and equipped. • Supporting platoons • Supporting brush cutter teams • 1 Project management team

3.2.4 Land Release Concept According to the 2002 National Landmine Impact Survey (L1S), 4,466 km2 of land area were suspected to be landmine/UXO contaminated. The L1S offers certain indicators of where these hazardous areas are, yet its information is not precise enough to effectively target demining tasks (After 15 years of landmine clearance, much of these 4,466 km2 of land area remained suspected). As limited attempts to conduct risk management assessment to reduce the L1S outputs to a more proximate landmine area occurred, the option to clear larger suspected areas was undertaken. This often resulted in only a few hazardous items and in some cases no hazardous items found. This safe option is in fact not an efficient use of clearance resources. A more effective survey methodology was needed to accurately pinpoint the specific hazardous high risk areas and to release those which are identified as low risk.

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Since 2002 in an attempt to be more efficient in resource use and effective in demining intervention, CMAC has initiated technical survey work in a number of landmine/UXO highly affected districts - Pailin, Battambang and most recently in Siem Reap. This survey has reduced the size of land area once identified as Suspected Hazard Area (SHA) by the L1S into smaller size land areas and classified them according to their level of risk as ‘confirmed’ or ‘suspected’ or ‘residual’. These classifications together with their proper demarcation and documentation are powerful tools for planning, prioritization and risk reduction. The survey information also provides an accurate picture both quantitatively and qualitatively of landmine/UXO contamination in a survey area and has resulted in the release of thousands of hectares of formally suspected areas back to the affected community for productive use. Since last year CMAC has been in the final phase of refining its 2006 land release protocol. CMAC has received technical assistance from NPA and GICHD in the land release protocol development. This will be CMAC’s augmented contribution the national policy on land release, providing an innovative method to release land without having to fully clear all suspected areas. Moreover, this newly revised protocol will complement the national baseline survey CMAS to be soon released by the CMAA. 3.2.5 BAC Proactive Approach According to the National ERW Strategy 2008 – 2015, Cambodia needs an innovative way to address the residual ERW threats to completely eliminate risks posed to the communities. Accidents involving “Explosive Remnants of War” (ERW) continue to result in higher numbers of casualties than landmines. Battambang Province continued to suffer the largest percentage of accidents involving both ERW and landmines. Recent reports and strategic documents have been critical of the lack of “proactive” interventions for ERW response in Cambodia. In response to this situation, CMAC will deploy a number of teams on different ERW Response activities during 2009. CMAC will transfer certain elements of DU3 from normal demining duties to “ERW” response interventions. From January 2009, 2 Mobile Platoons will be restructured to form two Battle Area Teams (BAT) comprise of 16 persons each, and one Battle Area Village team (BAV) of 7 persons. The Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) response operations will include the following interventions.

1. EOD Response

This is the normal reactive response, where small 3 person teams will deploy on receipt of requests from local communities/police etc, to clear small amounts of ERW.

2. UXO Clearance

This is the systematic clearance of areas identified and mapped during survey, where all UXO is to be removed prior to development of the land. The selection of these areas will be conducted in accordance with local community priorities. This intervention will be implemented by the two 16 person BAT teams.

3. Systematic Village ERW Clearance (Pilot Project)

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This intervention will be implemented initially by the small 7 person (BAV) team trained in EOD and UXO clearance operations. During this intervention the villages within the target commune are visited in priority order and where possible are cleared of all known and reported ERW in a systematic fashion. The priority village list is agreed following selection by the authorities of priority areas based on factors such as accident statistics, community development, etc. This approach is more proactive than normal EOD response. This may include UXO clearance of small areas of contamination within the target village area. The size of the area will be limited to less than one hectare.

3.2.6 Landmine and UXO Clearance In 2009, with the total expected budget, CMAC expects to clear a total of 35,135,500 m² of minefield area, compared with 29,705,098 m² target for 2008. This includes 27,179,500 m² of landmine contamination area (minefields) and 7,956,000 m² of UXO contamination area (UXO fields). This expected clearance figure is based on the forecast available budget of approximately 12,424,692 USD from both UNDP and bilateral commitment for the year. Of this clearance figure, around 72% of the target is expected to be achieved through bilateral projects, and the remaining 28% is expected to be covered by UNDP’s Clearing for Results. In addition to the clearance target, CMAC also expects to reduce approximately 120 km² of suspected area once reported in the Level 1 Survey and collect and destroy around 132,000 UXO as part of the survey and risk reduction activities. The massive training courses in 2008 providing multi-skills to the demining teams indicate that CMAC is preparing for another boost in productivity. With the skills provided through these training courses, now the teams can do their own survey and marking of the minefields to be cleared and completed; thus saving time and resources and freeing for the current survey teams to complete other tasks somewhere else. UXO identification and demolition skills equipped to the conventional demining teams mean that they will be less rely on the EOD intervention, giving more time for the EOD teams to respond to the EOD calls. The introduction of the mechanical demining machines will also greatly contribute to the increase in the productivity. Based on the results of the completed tests and evaluations of these machines, they are capable of delivering a high operational output if suitable terrains are selected for them. They will be deployed in large minefields in high casualty districts in Battambang to provide proactive landmine clearance response to the affected communities. While the MDD will continue to play an important role, the explosive detection dogs (EDD) are expected to increase their productivity significantly. CMAC has been conducting a trial in single search operations and early results show that this is a very promising search technique for UXO contamination areas. The target set for 2009 indicates a significant increase in operational outputs compared to the past 15 years. This confirms CMAC's strong commitment to continued improvements and its effort to contribute to the Government's Rectangular Strategy and Cambodia's Millennium Development Goals as well as the poverty reduction efforts undertaken by the Royal Government.

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3.2.7 Confirmed and Expected Projects in 2009 No Project Locations Donor/Partner Remarks I. Mine and UXO Clearance, Survey and Mine/UXO Risk Education 1 UNDP "Clearing for

Results" DU1, DU2, DU4, ERO

UNDP/Multi-donors*

Clearing for Results in Banteay Meanchey, Battambang, Preah Vihear, Kampong Thom and eastern provinces

2 NPA (Netherlands) DU1, DU2 Netherlands Project to support and enhance technical survey in Battambang and Siem Reap

3 Austcare DU1 Australia Integrated demining and development in Banteay Meanchey

4 Baseline Survey Project DU1, 2, 3 UNDP/Multi-donors*

Baseline survey activities to support national landmine clearance

5 Japan-Grassroots DU2 Japan - Humanitarian demining in Battambang - Period: January – September 2008

6 Peacebuilding Project DU2 Japan - Integrated landmine clearance and landmine victim assistance and provision of demining machines - Three years starting from October 2008

7 Japan-Grassroots DU2 Japan - Supports demining machines and manual teams - Officially ends in March 2009

8 Japan-JMAS DU2 Japan Community-based demining in Battambang 9 US-DU3 DU3 USA Humanitarian demining in Pailin and Samlot 10 Japan-Grassroots DU4 Japan Humanitarian demining in Kampong Thom and Preah

Vihear 11 Germany-DU6 DU6 Germany Humanitarian demining in Siem Reap and Oddar

Meanchey 12 ECOSORN DU1, DU2,

DU4 EC Integrated demining and development in north-west

provinces (ECOSORN Project) 13 Japan-JMAS ERO, HQ Japan EOD, CBURR 14 Japan-ASEAN

Integration Fund ERO, DU1 Japan - Humanitarian demining and UXO clearance

- Officially ends in March 2009 15 US-CMAC for UXO

Clearance ERO US - ERW clearance operations in eastern provinces

16 BHP Billiton CSU BHP Billiton Mineral Exploration in Mondul Kiri 17 PGS CSU PGS Mineral Exploration around Tonle Sap Lake 18 MAG (MDD) DU2, DU3,

DU4 MAG Renting of CMAC's MDD teams for MAG operations

19 UNICEF All DU's UNICEF MRE, CBMRR 20 Peaceboat DU4 Peaceboat Expected (demining and school construction) 21 CMAC-HIB ERO HIB Expected (Proactive UXO clearance in eastern provinces)II. Demining and Development 22 GEJ: Good Earth Japan DU2 Hitachi Post-clearance development 23 JMAS-CMAC CID DU2 Komatsu Community-Integrated development (CID) III. Research and Development 24 HSTAMIDS Training DU2 NVESD HSTAMIDS training and trial (GPR detector) 25 ALIS Training TC Tohoku University

(Japan) ALIS training and trial (GPR detector)

26 Explosive Harvesting Program

HQ,TC USA/Golden West R&D in explosive harvesting

IV. Provision of Equipment and Technical Assistance 27 GTC (MDD) HQ, TC Sweden Provision of MDD and technical assistance 28 Technical Cooperation HQ, CWS Japan/JICA Provision of technical advisors 29 Technical Cooperation HQ, TC New Zealand/QSI Provision of technical advisors to TC 30 AYAD/VIDA HQ, DU4 AusAID Provision of volunteers 31 Grant Aid Phase V All Japan/JICA Provision of equipment to support demining Total Projects 2009: 31

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3.2.8 Land Use Post Clearance Minefield selection for the IWP 2009 is based on the PMAC/MAPU process, except the emergency risk reduction tasks, which account for around 10% of the total target. Based on initial pre-clearance socio-economic assessment of the minefields selected for clearance in 2009, CMAC targets to clear a total of 361 sites to support development plans. These include 137 for agriculture, 30 sites for resettlement, 58 for resettlement and agriculture, 52 sites for roads, and the remaining for water canals/irrigation, schools, water ponds, pagodas and others. From this statistics, agriculture and road construction remain the high priority, in line with the Royal Government's strategy of poverty reduction and infrastructure development. Chart of Planned Land Use based on Initial Socio-Economic Assessment

Others (1)6.34%

Administrative Office 0.22%Health Center

0.01%

Pagoda1.54%

Schools3.67%

Pond0.13%

Roads9.68%

Canal/Irrigation1.02%

Resettlement & Agriculture21.04%

Agriculture46.98%

Resettlement9.41%

3.3 BUDGET IN 2009 In 2009, CMAC's total budgetary plan reaches over 21 million, of which around 14 million is expected for operational budget and the remaining 7.2 million is for equipment and technical assistance in estimated terms. Of the 14 million expected to support operations, around 10.5 million has been confirmed based on the best available information at the time of preparing this work plan. However, this figure may change based in the real funding situation. This also indicates that CMAC still has a budgetary shortfall of 3.55 million, which needs to be addressed. Of this, CMAC has submitted proposals to donors for 2.42 million to reduce the shortfall, and CMAC is still looking for new sources of funding to address the other 1.13 million.

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4. OPERATIONAL WORK PLAN 4.1 CORE ACTIVITY ONE: LANDMINE AND UXO CLEARANCE The backbone activity of CMAC has been landmine and UXO clearance, in order to achieve maximum risk reduction, return land to productive use, and meet the international obligation on anti-personnel landmine destruction. CMAC has been professional and committed in its attitude towards maintaining a strong capacity in landmine and UXO clearance. It has made every effort to be a leader in these activities, recognizing the effect on the number of casualties and the economic and social development of the country. CMAC has cleared over 200 km² and found and destroyed over 1.7 million mines and UXO in the past 15 years, a significant amount of clearance achieved by a single demining organization. This has been made possible as a result of CMAC’s emphasis on continuous improvement across clearance methodology and technology, and the dedicated hard work on the ground by every deminer. CMAC deploys a number of demining toolboxes to carry out clearance tasks. The clearance tasks are identified and prioritized by local communities through their provincial authorities (PMAC/MAPU) and prepared and marked for clearance by technical survey (TST) teams. CMAC demining toolboxes consist of the following tools:

• demining platoons (normal and mobile), • community-based demining platoons (CBD), • landmine and UXO detection dog (MDD/EDD) teams, • mechanical clearance machines (brush cutters), • explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) teams, • community mine clearance (CMC) teams, • battle area clearance (BAC/BAT) teams, • explosive remnants of wars clearance (ERC) teams, • battle area clearance by village (BAV) teams, • demining machines, and • mechanical Vegetation Clearance Machine (Brush Cutters)

AP Type 69 Found in Rice field at Svay Chek Banteay Mean Chey Province by Demining Unit 1

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CMAC’s clearance teams are mainly deployed to support humanitarian and development priorities as determined by the local and provincial authorities (PMAC and MAPU) and to respond to risk reduction requests by the highly affected communities. 2009 will see a slight change in the number of clearance teams and platoons due the plan to expand on battle area clearance operations. Demining Unit 3 will have some demining platoons replaced by battle area clearance teams. This BAC initiative will further strengthen CMAC's ability to respond to the ERW problem currently in focus due to an increasing proportion of casualties. 4.1.1.1 Landmine/UXO Clearance Goal In 2009 CMAC aims to clear approximately 355 minefields, or 361 development sites, with 27,179,500 m² of landmine contaminated area (minefields) and at least 7,956,000 m² of UXO contaminated area (UXO fields) in the highest priority areas. 4.1.1.2 Landmine/UXO Clearance Objectives

1. Increase the overall clearance productivity to 35,135,500 m². (Therefore meeting the first year's clearance target of CMAC's Five-Year Strategic Plan 2009-2013 and contributing to the national Rectangular Strategy, Millennium Development Goals and the Ottawa Convention

2. Clear 27,179,500 m² of highly contaminated areas (minefield) in highly impacted

communities. (Based on tasks prioritized and selected by the local communities and provincial authorities (PMAC and MAPU) to support development activities and projects, in conjunction with development partners. It is expected that around 3,000,000 m² of this figure will be cleared to respond to emergency risk reduction requests.

3. Clear approximately 7,956,000 m² of battlefield area (UXO field). 4. Destroy at least 132,000 pieces of UXO of all types. (Releasing over half a million

people in vulnerable groups, including children, from the threat.

UXO found by in Ratanak Mondul, Battambang Province Demining Unit 2-Battambang

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5. Follow the priority selection through the PMAC/MAPU process and make use of the results from the new baseline survey conducted by CMAC and other accredited operators.

6. Produce a measurable and

significant socio-economic impact on affected communities by fully integrating landmine clearance with community development plans established by the local and provincial authorities in conjunction with development partners and NGO’s.

7. Make further efforts to improve

the cooperation and coordination with PMAC and MAPU ensuring that the most needy people will benefit from CMAC's demining activities.

8. Respond to community requests for UXO collection and destruction in order for risk

reduction in a timely and effective manner, through cooperation with the local and national police and armed forces.

9. Strengthen the UXO sub-surface clearance efforts, take a proactive approach using all

available tools, and introduce the Battle Area Clearance (BAC/BAT) teams and Battle Area Clearance by Village (BAV) teams to carry out sub-surface UXO tasks.

10. Continue to search for innovative

clearance methods and technology. and reform and strengthen the operational teams to ensure that CMAC will be able to deal with landmine/UXO threats on a timely, effective, cost-efficient and competitive manner.

11. Continue to strengthen middle and

front line management through ongoing staff training to maintain and increase operational and management capacity.

12. Maintain an effective quality

assurance and control regime to ensure safe, quality and productive operations performance.

UXO found by in Ratanak Mondul, Battambang Province Demining Unit 2-Battambang

AP Type PMN2 found by Demining Unit 2 in Battambang Province

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13. Continue to actively promote and adhere to the principle of safety, quality and productivity at all levels of staff.

4.1.1.3 Landmine/UXO Clearance Indicators Landmine and UXO clearance will:

- Clear 27,179,500 m² of highly contaminated areas (minefield)

- Clear approximately 7,956,000 m² of

battlefield area (ERW field) - Respond to around 10,000 EOD calls

for emergency interventions. - Destroy at least 132,000 pieces of

UXO of all types. - Benefit some 14,000 families directly

and 57,000 families indirectly as well as approximately 14,400 students in 252 highly landmine/UXO contaminated villages. Overall approximately 228,000 people will benefit from the demining activities in 2009.

- Significantly contribute to further casualty reduction countrywide through both landmine

and UXO clearance activities.

- Support livelihood, social, economic and infrastructure development of the post-clearance communities

- Increase confidence of villagers using land they once feared.

4.1.2.2 Landmine/UXO Clearance Activities CMAC will undertake the following activities, through the mobilization of different toolboxes, to achieve the landmine/UXO clearance targets and objectives highlighted in this IWP. 4.1.2.2.1 Manual Demining Platoons The manual demining platoons will remain the workhorse of CMAC’s demining operations. These manual demining platoons carry out large-scale clearance of minefields requested by the affected communities, prioritized and selected for clearance by the local and provincial authorities (PMAC and MAPU) to support DU1 Demining Activity in Malay,

Banteay Meanchey Province

AP Type PMN2 found in Ratanak Mondul, Battambang Province Demining Unit 2-Battambang

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development activities and projects established in conjunction with development partners. The number of mobile platoons will be further decreased from 34 at the end of 2008 to only 30 by the middle of 2009. However, they will be replaced by the establishment of the BAC and BAV teams to target more ERW clearance. These platoons will be further strengthened through the provision of additional multi-skills in terms of survey marking and UXO demolition capacity and equipment. With these skills and complementary equipment, they will work less dependently on Technical Survey and EOD teams as they can mark and close minefields as well as conduct UXO demolition themselves. Planned Activities:

1. Clear a total of 9,882,000 m² of area prioritized and selected by the PMAC and MAPU.

(The overall target for 2008 was 12,312,000 m². The decrease in target in 2009 is due to the demobilization of mobile platoons to establish BAC/BAT and BAV teams.)

2. Equip the mobile

platoons with survey and UXO demolition skills and equipment to be less dependent on survey and EOD teams.

3. Review and update

clearance SOPs to include innovative methods and technologies to enhance landmine clearance safety, quality and productivity.

4. Continue to improve and

maximize the integration of the manual demining platoons with other toolboxes to ensure that this tool is most effectively utilized in the minefield.

AP Type 69 found in Battambang Province by Demining Unit 2- Battambnag

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5. Continue to provide training in front line and field management for field staff to continually improve and increase their operational and managerial knowledge to meet field requirements.

6. Provide on-the-job management training

to the front line managers to strengthen their capacity to manage the field operations.

Indicators:

Average rate of clearance by a platoon between 20,000-30,000 m² per month.

Total of approximately 9,882,000 m² of high priority area is cleared by CMAC demining.

4.1.2.2.2 Community-Based Demining Platoons (CBD) To respond to the magnitude of the landmine/UXO problem in highly contaminated communities with high casualty rates, where young people lack the means to generate income and are at risk from their activities, and the economy and resettlement are severely impeded by the presence of large minefields surrounding the communities, Community Based Demining Platoons (CBD) can begin to solve these problems. CMAC CBD platoons involve the affected communities in conducting their own landmine/UXO clearance in their local communities for the purpose of community rehabilitation and development. Accordingly, CBD has been established at the commune level with community deminers recruited and trained from the affected villages within the communes. The principle aim of the community-based demining is to reduce the risks to the community and provide safe access to land for the community rehabilitation and development. Female villagers are especially encouraged to participate in this initiative. Members of the CBD platoons are provided with the same training, equipment and gear as the regular CMAC platoons. Due to the funding situation, 1 CBD platoon will be demobilized in 2009, leaving a total 4 CBD platoons in operations in Battambang, and Banteay Meanchey.

AP MBV 78A2 found in Battambang Province by Demining Unit 2- Battambnag

CBD Demining Activities in Kamrieng, Battambang Province Demining Unit 2- Battambnag

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Planned Activities:

1. Clear an approximately area of 857,500 m² of area in the CBD communities. (To provide land for agriculture, safe settlerment, safe access to resources and economic and development activities as identified by the local community).

2. Continue to encourage female

participation within the CBD program and leadership in order to promote female roles in the communities.

3. Enhance the capacity,

knowledge and experience of the CBD deminers and platoon leadership, through technical assistance, on-the-job training and refresher training, in order to improve their effectiveness and performance.

4. Iimprove the local planning and task selection process to optimize the socio-economic

benefits from clearance through empowering the village development committees to effectively identify priorities and link these priorities with the village and commune development plans.

5. Coordinate with the local

authorities where CBD platoons operate to optimize communication and understanding and encourage their active involvement in the planning, implementation and post-clearance process.

6. Enhance the process of socio-

economic assessment and records of land cleared by the CBD platoons.

Indicators:

CBD platoon will clear an

average of 15,000 – 20,000 m² AP Type PMN2 found in Battambang Province

by Demining Unit 2- Battambnag

Woman Deminner - CBD Demining Activities in Kamrieng, Battambang Province, Demining Unit 2- Battambnag

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of area per month, with the total clearance target reaching 857,000 m² in 2009 for all CBD platoons.

CBD performance is optimized and safety record is good (no incidents). Community rehabilitation and development will take place on the former minefields in

the community. 4.1.2.2.3 Landmine/Explosive Detection Dog (MDD/EDD) Landmine/UXO Detection Dogs have become one of the most important and effective demining tools in recent years, and many demining organizations are becoming more and more confident in utilizing dogs to support demining activities. CMAC has established and sustained an effective operational MDD/EDD program, and has extended this service to MAG to support MAG’s demining operations in Cambodia. In 2007, 4 explosive detection dog teams (total 8 dogs) for UXO clearance became operational and were deployed in Kampong Cham to further speed up the UXO clearance operations. One year down the track, as part of its continued and strong commitment to improving the operational procedures and boosting productivity, MAC conducted a trial on EDD single search operations, which will see innovative ways of using the Explosive Detection Dogs in the UXO fields. This trial started in late 2008 and will continue into 2009 to assess the performance and outputs as well as costs associated. Early results indicate that this is a promising method of using explosive detection dogs in UXO contaminated areas and this innovative way will boost productivity significantly without compromising quality and safety. CMAC has started a mine detection dog breeding program. This initiative is underway with 3 puppies born in Southeast Asia offspring of proven mine detection dog parents and 10 new puppies supplied by GTC in Bosnia.

MDD Activities in Banteay Meanchey, Demining Unit1 Meanchey Province

MDD Activities in Battambang Province, Demining Unit 2 Battambang

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With the program up and running and some further investment, CMAC expects to run and manage the first landmine detection dog breeding program in south-east Asia and this is expected to benefit Cambodia and the region greatly. In 2009, 10 short leash MDD teams (4 dogs per team), 4 long leash MDD team (2 dogs per team) and 4 Explosive Detection Dog (EDD) teams (2 dogs per team) will be deployed. Planned Activities:

1. Clear a total of 4,200,000 m² of landmine contamination area (minefields) and 1,440,000 m² of UXO contamination area (UXO fields). (To support national and PMAC/MAPU's priorities and risk reduction activities.)

2. Collect and destroy around 2,400 UXO and cluster munitions. 3. Continue to cooperate with MAG by contracting 3 of the 10 short leash MDD teams to

support MAG’s demining activities, 2 teams in Battambang and 1 team in Preah Vihear.

4. Continue the single search trial of EDD teams and assess and evaluate output and effectiveness.

5. Continue the breeding and

puppy program efforts and improve facilities aimed at producing the landmine/UXO detection dogs and diversifying/expanding the skills of trained dogs to other areas.

6. Continue to reform the

MDD/EDD structure, methods and technologies in order to find innovative ways of employing dogs in the field.

EDD Activities in Kampong Cham Province, Eastern Regional Office in Kampong Cham

UXO found by EDD Team in Kampong Cham Province, Eastern Regional Office in Kampong Cham

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7. Continue to cooperate with NPA’s Global Training Centre (GTC) in Bosnia in dog

training and technical aspects.

8. Strengthen the cooperation with MAG to seek further opportunities for cooperation, both in Cambodia and in the region.

9. Seek opportunities to expand CMAC's working dog services and experience locally and

internationally.

10. Continue to strengthen MDD/EDD training, test and licensing capacity, veterinarian services as well as field training and testing through improved training materials, plans and practices to ensure high quality and fitness of MDD and maximize their performance.

11. Continue to encourage more

female participation in the MDD/EDD program to promote gender in the MDD/EDD program.

12. Strengthen the capacity of

the MDD/EDD operational and management staff, through workshops, training, on-the-job training and effective appraisal mechanisms, to ensure greater professionalism, responsibility and performance, To have an effective personnel management mechanism, including recruitment, training and vacancy management, to optimize performance and minimize downtime.

Cluster Munitions found by EDD Team in Kampong Cham Province, Eastern Regional Office in Kampong Cham

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13. Continue to review and improve MDD and EDD clearance SOPs to include innovative methods and technologies to enhance landmine and UXO clearance safety, quality and productivity.

14. Engage an external independent consultant to evaluate EDD teams performance to ensure

they meet internationally accepted standards. Indicators:

Average rate of clearance by an MDD/EDD team between 20,000 - 30,000 m² per month . 5,640,000 m² is cleared by MDD and EDD teams and the cleared minefields/battlefields

are handed over to the local authorities. EDD operates in single search mode. No landmine incident involving MDD members. Puppy program produces quality working dogs.

4.1.2.2.4 Mechanical Vegetation Clearance Machine (Brush Cutters)

Brush cutters (BC) were originally designed to cut and remove vegetation (non-ground engaging) in the landmine fields to support other demining components such as manual demining teams, platoons, and MDD teams. Since introduction into operations the brush cutters have enormously sped up the demining process and have changed the way demining is conducted in Cambodia. The use of these machines coupled with better field management and training, allowed CMAC to double its productivity in 2005 and continues to deliver very high productivity onward. In 2005, CMAC took a new initiative to trial the BC system as a stand-alone landmine clearance (ground engaging) system in addition to it’s sole vegetation clearing function. The trial was successful and the system proves a very effective and useful landmine clearance system. As a result of the trial, CMAC reviewed the SOP and started to use the brush cutters for both vegetation cutting and ground engaging activities. To make them even more effective and efficient, 4 deminers are attached to each brush cutter. With the evident of BC capability and continued high productivity outputs, CMAC further reformed the structure of the brush cutter teams to make them more operationally independent. CMAC attached two more deminers to each brush cutter team, making a total of 8 members per brush cutter team (6 deminers and 2 operators). The monthly clearance target was also significantly increased from 17,500 m² to 30,000 m² 2007 (a 41.7% increase). In 2007, CMAC retired 4 of the brush cutters from demining operations due to age, maintenance, operational performance and safety concerns. However, they are still used for development tasks to support community development.

Mechanical Vegetation Clearance Machine Activities of Demining Unit 4 Siem Reap Province

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The same number of brush cutters teams (23 teams) will be deployed in 2009 compared to 2008. This will result in similar productivity outputs and operational deployment. Planned Activities:

1. Clear a total area of 8,280,000 m² in addition to a total cutting target of 9,660,000 m² to support manual and MDD demining teams.

2. Continue the integration of

the brush cutters with appropriate demining toolboxes to maximize productivity.

3. Continue to review and

update the brush cutter SOPs to implement innovative methods and technologies to add to the brush cutter operations to maximize their performance and effectiveness.

4. Continue to conduct efficiency analysis (productivity, fuel consumption, downtime,

maintenance and repairs) to seek the most suitable methods, SOPs and terrain for the deployment of the brush cutters.

5. Ensure quality maintenance of the brush cutters to keep them in the best operational

conditions at all times.

6. Continue to enhance the operational experience and skills of the operators in both safety and technical aspects to ensure that the machines are well used and maintained.

7. Continue to strengthen the capacity of the DU's management and operations staff to

manage and plan for the deployment and operations of brush cutters.

8. Employ the brush cutters to support development activities such as digging ponds, canals and building roads, etc.

Indicators:

Average rate of clearance by a brush cutter team reaches between 25,000 – 35,000 m² per

month. Staff capacity to manage the brush cutters enhanced.

Integrated Manual Clearance and Brush Cutter at Demining Unit 4 Siem Reap Province

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Field management of brush cutter operations and operations integration is effective and efficient.

Brush cutters properly maintained. 4.1.2.2.5 Mechanical Demining Machines

CMAC has successfully tested and trialed three demining machines of Hitachi and Komatsu types. This research and development project was supported by the Government of Japan. The operational trial under Phase II of the R&D project ended in November 2008, and through this trial the machine demonstrated remarkable performance and proved capable of field operation in Cambodia. Upon this successful test and evaluation, CMAC issued acceptance letters for all the three machines. Each of these machines has distinctive capabilities and limitations. CMAC realizes that these machines will help CMAC further substantially increase demining outputs. Recognizing this potential, CMAC has requested the Japanese Government to donate 8 additional machines in the next year or so.

The machines and their supporting teams will potentially be deployed mainly in t wo districts in Battambang provinces: Bavel and Ratanak Mondul. However, operational locations can be expanded to other areas based on actual needs assessment. In 2009, CMAC plans to deploy four demining machines: three donated by the Japanese Government and one additional supported under the Community Integrated Development project supported by Komatsu Ltd. Komatsu Ltd also provides financial support, through JMAS, to support the operations of the demining machine and development activities managed jointly by CMAC and JMAS.

Mechanical Clearance Machine Hitachi Push Type in Operations in Ratanak Mondul, Battambang, Demining Unit 2

Mechanical Clearance Machine Hitachi Swing Type in Operations in Ratanak Mondul, Battambang, Demining Unit 2

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Planned Activities:

1. Clear a total area of approximately 2,880,000 m². (To provide the target communities with a safer environment and sustainable agriculture facilities.)

2. Integrate the demining machines with suitable manual demining teams or dog teams to

increase productivity and ensure quality of demining.

3. Utilize the demining machines in technical survey to accelerate the release of land.

4. Continue to review and

update the SOPs of the demining machines to find innovative methods to maximize their performance and effectiveness.

5. Conduct efficiency

analysis (productivity, fuel consumption, downtime, maintenance and repairs) to seek the most suitable methods, SOPs and terrain for the deployment of the demining machines.

6. Ensure quality maintenance of the demining machines to keep them in the best

operational conditions at all times. 7. Continue to enhance the operational experience and skills of the operators in both safety

and technical aspects to ensure that the machines are well used and maintained.

8. Strengthen the capacity of the DU's management and operations staff to manage and plan for the deployment and operations of demining machines.

Indicators:

Average rate of clearance by a demining machine team reaches between 50,000 – 60,000

m² per month. Staff capacity to manage demining machines enhanced. Field management of demining machine operations and operations integration is effective

and efficient. Demining machines properly maintained.

Mechanical Clearance Machine Komatsu Push Type in Operations in Ratanak Mondul, Battambang, Demining Unit 2

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4.1.2.2.6 Community Mine Clearance (CMC) In an effort to increase the efficiency and effectiveness to provide quick response to the requests for risk reduction and small scale development by the affected communities, in 2005 CMAC established

quick response teams called CommunityMine Clearance (CMC) teams. A CMC Team consists of 9 people: 1 Team Leader, 1 Senior Member and 7 Members. The task of the CMC team is to conduct small scale clearance of land up to one hectare (10,000 m²) to provide risk reduction and support development. These teams clear minefields identified, prioritized and selected by PMAC/MAPU, put up long term marking, as well as respond to the risk reduction tasks requested by the communities on an emergency basis. There are at least two major important characteristics of the CMC teams, which make them outstanding and in a very high

demand: they are multi-skilled (they can both clear landmines and ERW) and they are very highly flexible and mobile. In 2009, CMAC will deploy 9 CMC teams. There were up to 16 CMC teams in the first half of 2008, but they have been eventually decreased to 9 teams because others have been transformed into BAC (battle area clearance) and ERC (ERW clearance) teams, conducting sub-surface ERW clearance. Planned Activities:

1. Clear a total of 1,080,000 m² of contamination area. (To support risk reduction and community development tasks and priorities.)

2. Continue to strengthen the

CMC teams in EOD response capacity and deploy them to conduct sub-surface UXO clearance where appropriate.

CMC Team Members in the discussion group before starting the operation

CMC Quick Response Activities in Battambang Province

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3. Continue to provide appropriate training to the CMC teams to enable them to perform

their duties effectively and productively both in landmine and UXO clearance.

4. Optimize and consistently record the socio-economic impact generated by the work of the CMC teams.

5. Increase teams’ technical capacity through refresher training courses and/or induction

training to fix the technical gaps and weaknesses identified from field operations.

6. Continue to improve CMC SOPs which include innovative methods to enhance landmine and UXO clearance productivity.

Indicators:

10,000-13,000 m² of contaminated areas is cleared by a CMC team per month. No incidents or accidents involving CMC members. Flexibility and efficiency are maintained and optimized. Landmines and UXO collected and properly disposed of.

4.1.2.2.7 ERW Clearance The explosives remnants of wars scattered virtually everywhere in the country after the three-decade long conflicts and heavy US bombing continues to pose a fatal threat to millions of civilian population. The evidence of the magnitude of the ERW problem lies with the high ongoing casualty rate Cambodia suffers. The attractive shape of ERW and the scrap metal trade makes these ERW attractive, especially cluster munitions, one of the most dangerous killers in post-war Cambodia. Furthermore, with expanded economic and commercial activities as a result of road links and mining contracts in the eastern provinces it was the required response that CMAC expand its ERW clearance capacity to the eastern provinces. In 2008, 4 ERC teams and 8 BAC teams were established to provide sub-surface ERC clearance response in the eastern provinces (4 ERC teams to support Japan-ASEAN Integration Project and 8 BAC teams to support BHP Billiton's Mineral Exploration Project). 2009 will see a further increase in the number of ERW clearance teams, with the planned establishment of 4 BAT teams and 1 BAV team. These abovementioned teams mentioned have similar roles and functions, but may differ in structure and the nature of deployment. All conduct surface and sub-surface ERW clearance. The

ERW Deep Search Activities to Support BHP Billiton in Mineral Exploration in

Mondul Kiri Province

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BAV team provides a proactive ERW clearance response, meaning that they will stay operational in a village until the whole village is clean of ERW. Structurally, an ERC team consists of 7 members, an BAC team consists of 5 members, a BAV team consists of 7 member, and a BAT team consists of 16 members. Those teams are not the only teams engaged in ERW activities. In addition, CMAC utilizes other tools, including EOD, CMC, EDD and MRE teams to provide EOD response. In 2008, CMAC also trained 650 deminers in EOD, putting the total qualified EOD staff available for ERW intervention operations at around 900 personnel, who are qualified in both demining and EOD. Planned Activities:

1. Clear a total of 5,832,000 m² of UXO contamination area. (To support risk reduction and community development tasks and priorities.)

2. Collect and destroy around 9,000 UXO and cluster munitions. 3. Target and clear cluster

munitions as a matter of priority when locations of cluster munitions are identified or reported.

4. Use CBURR network to

obtain appropriate information for ERW target planning and intervention.

5. Continue to strengthen the

ERW clearance teams in ERW response capacity and deploy them to effectively conduct sub-surface UXO clearance.

6. Continue to provide appropriate training to the ERW clearance teams to enable them to

perform their duties effectively and productively.

ERW items including Cluster Bomb were collected by ERW Team in JAIF Project in Kampong Cham Province

Cluster Bombs (ERW) were collected by ERW Team in JAIF Project in Kampong Cham Province

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7. Optimize and consistently record the socio-economic impact generated by the work of the ERW clearance teams.

8. Increase teams’ technical capacity

through refresher training courses and/or induction training to fix the technical gaps and weaknesses identified from field operations.

9. Continue to improve the BAC

SOPs to include innovative methods to enhance ERW clearance effectiveness.

10. Maintain accurate ERW and cluster

munitions reports, whereas cluster munitions will be separated from conventional ERW.

Indicators:

Clearance targets met. No incidents or accidents involving

the ERW clearance members. Flexibility and efficiency

maintained and optimized. ERW, cluster munitions and

landmines collected and properly disposed of.

Civilian casualties by ERW and cluster munitions reduced.

4.1.2.2.8 Unexploded Ordnance Disposal (EOD) In 2008 CMAC received over 9,400 calls for EOD response and interventions. Up to November 2008, a total of 137 casualties countrywide were caused by UXO. As EOD response requests continue and increase in number, CMAC is required to continue to make an ongoing significant contribution to the national EOD response capacity. CMAC needs to maintain EOD capacity and skills to respond to this growing demand and the established EOD Response framework within the National EOD Strategic Plan and the Royal Government's commitment to combat the UXO problem. In 2009, CMAC will continue to deploy 27 EOD

ERW item (Cluster Bomb) left behind the war was collected by ERW Team in JAIF Project in Kampong

Cham Province

EOD Team Examined the Requests raised by Local Villagers in Kampong Cham

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teams countrywide to provide emergency response to the EOD calls. These teams will also respond to cluster munitions and landmines in addition to conventional ERW. There will also be a need for CMAC to expand its EOD capacity to underwater EOD, chemical EOD, IED and other forms of specialized EOD. Planned Activities:

1. Collect and destroy at least 113,400 pieces of UXO of all types, including cluster munitions. (Potentially saving thousand people in vulnerable groups, including children.)

2. Conduct spot checks and limited clearance of over half a million square meters of ERW contaminated area for risk reduction.

3. Work with donors and partners

to seek opportunities to increase EOD capacity and technical skills in response to the growing need for ERW and cluster munitions response.

4. Deliver more EOD training courses (both basic and advanced) to prepare for ERW

activity expansion.

5. Continue to utilize and strengthen the capability of the EDD, CMC, BAC teams and MRE teams in the ERW response tasks and skills to help make greater impact on the communities requiring EOD response.

6. Strengthen the CBURR District

Focal Points in order to assist the affected communities to address the UXO problem by identifying risks and priorities, coordinating EOD activities and providing risk education to the local people.

7. Continue to research for new

technology to assist ERW activities such as deep search technology, large array detection technology and UXO excavation tools.

8. Establish underwater EOD

Bomb MK82 was mostly found in the Eastern Provinces, Prey Veng, Svay Rieng, Kampong Cham, Kracheh, Steung Treng,

Ratanak Kiri and Mondul Kiri. This picture is in Kampong Cham

UXO Collection was made by EOD Team under JAIF Project in Kampong Cham Province

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team(s) to conduct ERW operations underwater.

9. Continue to strengthen the EOD Eastern Region Office in Kampong Cham to manage and control EOD activities in the eastern provinces along Cambodia-Vietnam border.

10. Coordinate and cooperate with the

National Police and Armed Forces in order to expand the UXO network, support law reinforcement authority on UXO handling, provide UXO awareness and risk education, report on UXO presence, and promote information sharing in order to tackle the UXO risks in affected communities. Also, to provide UXO identification and handling skills to the National Police and Armed Forces.

11. Make effort to support and implement

the National EOD Strategic Plan by continually strengthening CMAC's EOD skills and capacity through training, on-the-job training and experience exchange.

12. Continue to cooperate with Golden

West (Explosive Harvesting Program) to strengthen the EOD operators' capacity, skills and experience.

Indicators:

Response to 10, 000 EOD calls 300-350 pieces of UXO collected and

demolished by an EOD team. At least 113,400 pieces of UXO will be

destroyed by EOD teams in 2009 and contaminated land will be cleared of the UXO threat.

Requests/calls for UXO disposals are responded on time.

Underwater operations established. Declining casualty rate caused by UXO.

Cluster Bomb found by JAIF Project Team in Kampong Cham

Bomb Demolition by EOD Team under JAIF Project Team in Kampong Cham

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4.2. SURVEY AND LAND RELEASE 4.2.1. Baseline Survey 4.2.1.1. Background of the Baseline Survey There were number of needs which have suggested the reintroduction of a national baseline survey. They include the need of accurate information to support demining plan, prioritization and appropriate allocation of demining tools; the need to release of more land for productive use; and the need for a reliable and accurate information to quantify remaining risk in order to formulate a national mine action plan for the purpose of addressing the Article 5 of the Ottawa Convention. CMAC realized these needs for many years, and it has since 2003 initiated a survey technique “Technical Survey” which aimed to acquire (collect and verify) accurately and reliably landmine/UXO contamination information and classify the contaminated area according to risk level and enable clearance requirement to be clearly defined. This survey concept has evolved ever since through experience and practice in the field. Realizing these same needs, CMAA with support from the three accredited operators will soon initiate a district based baseline survey on highly affected districts. CMAC will be one of the operators to conduct this baseline survey. CMAC strongly believes, however that to get more accurate information on the real contamination area, other demining teams, including brush cutters and manual platoons, should be added to the survey process to assist the survey teams to:

• conduct physical verification of suspected areas, based on information collected or technical assessment of the survey teams, to accurately determine the problem

• access survey areas which would otherwise be inaccessible to the survey teams • break large suspected areas into manageable size in accordance with the common baseline

survey protocols, and • mark the survey areas for subsequent actions (classification, clearance, release)

4.2.1.2. Baseline Survey Goal The goal of the survey is to obtain accurate and reliable landmine/UXO information as well as to release land where reliably appropriate with the use of CMAC baseline survey teams integrated with

CMAC Survey Team working with local villagers in Samlot, Battambang Province to collect all relevant information in order to

identify the contaminated areas

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demining tools in contribution to the Royal Government's effort to meet the Ottawa Landmine Ban Treaty.

4.2.1.3. Baseline Survey Objectives CMAC's Survey operations in 2009 carry the following objectives:

1. Complete baseline survey in 16 high priority districts to be determined by CMAA within 12 months of the project period.

2. Acquire accurate and reliable mined

area information to support article 5 extension request and future landmine clearance plans to meet the obligation of the Landmine Ban Treaty.

3. Contribute to release of land once

suspected as contaminated areas and render them safe for productive use through survey for area reduction with integrated tools.

4.2.1.4. Planned Deployment

The project will see the deployment of the following teams:

• 8 baseline survey teams, fully retrained and equipped. • 4 supporting platoons • 4 supporting brush cutter teams • 1 Project management team

The project operations will be based on the following concept: • The selection of the districts to be surveyed will follow the direction from CMAA. • 2 baseline survey teams, 1 support platoon and 1 supporting brush cutter will complete 4 districts during

the project period of twelve months, making the total number of districts 16. • There needs to be certain flexibility of the team deployment to meet the real situation on the ground.

4.2.1.5. Baseline Survey Planned Activity Activity 1: Inception

- Define areas in consultation with CMAA where the baseline survey will take place. - Conduct pre-planning survey of the target districts - Acquire the common protocols and SOPs to be adopted for baseline survey

CMAC Survey Team in Samlot

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Activity 2: Preparation - Prepare training program for baseline

survey teams and other relevant bodies - Restructure the survey teams and equip

them for survey operations - Mobilize resources including survey

teams, supporting demining teams and equipment

- Provide initial training to survey teams and other relevant bodies

- Prepare for survey deployment in consultation with relevant stakeholders including DU, MAPU and local authority in accordance with MAP process

Activity 3: Implementation

- Implement baseline survey with support of CBMRR MUC network, local community leaders and other stakeholder participation including MAPU, MA-DWG, PMAC.

- Classification of survey areas - On-going training to relevant

authorities and CBMRR MUC network - Data sharing with other operators - Documenting and recording accurate

data at CMAC Database - Documenting and recording accurate

data at CMAA Database - QA/QC

Activity 4: Post-implementation

- Survey data consolidation with CMAA and data sharing with other operators

- Subsequent landmine clearance planning - Prioritization and task selection by PMAC - Clearance plan targeting high priority areas determined by the Royal Government

4.2.1.6. Baseline Survey Key Outputs

• Accurate and reliable landmine/UXO information to support article 5 extension request and future landmine action prioritization and clearance plan in 16 high casualty districts determined by CMAA.

• Areas classified as A's and B1 properly marked under the common marking protocol. • Level 1 survey data and other previous survey data superceded by the baseline survey findings.

CMAC Survey Team of Demining Unit 1 working with MAPU and PMAC in Banteay Meanchey to clearly identify

the boundary of minefield for clearance

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• Survey findings recorded in CMAC's and CMAA's databases. • Information available for future national clearance plans and prioritization. • Increased access to safe land through area reduction for productive use in 16 selected districts through

baseline survey with integrated demining tools.

4.2.2. Land Release 4.2.2.1. Background of Land Release Since 2003, CMAC began to conduct technical survey in highly contaminated districts in Pailin and Battambang and most recently in Siem Reap. This survey allowed CMAC to release more land that were initially suspected of being contaminated for productive use, and to employ its scarce demining resources more effectively through accurate prioritization of demining tasks and deployment of appropriate demining tools as the result of accurate information. Since last year CMAC has been working on a new land release protocol based on the international practice and standards. In 2009, CMAC plans to complete the development of the Land Release concept with the technical assistance from NPA and GICHD. This will involved many elements of consideration to make the whole process successful. The following are planned to be implemented: 4.2.2.2. Work Plan for Land Release

1. Submit the draft Land Release concept to CMAA for endorsement by the first quarter of 2009. This will become a CMAS on Land Release when adopted by CMAA. The CMAS on Land Release will address the following issues: Terminology Land release through general survey Land release through non-technical survey Land release through technical survey Land release through full clearance Composition of capabilities Documentation Information of management

Information Collection by asking local villagers who are living in contaminated area- CMAC Survey Team #04 in

Siem Reap Province

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2. Conduct workshop to communicate the land release concept to key players and stakeholders.

3. Make necessary preparations for the

execution of the Land Release concept. Equipment

requirements/considerations Management implications Information management Training requirements Decision making mechanisms QA and Monitoring SOP revision

4.2.2.3. Other Survey Activities Apart from the baseline survey and the development of land release concept, CMAC will also conduct other survey activities to support demining operations in general. This role will involve pre and post clearance survey, marking, and area reduction through assessment of requested tasks to avoid full clearance in all areas requested. CMAC needs to also ensure that these survey activities will be aligned with the baseline survey and land release concepts to be initiated in the near future. It is expected that survey under this category will reduce approximately 70,000,000 m² from the formerly suspected areas reported under the Level 1 Survey. 4.3. LANDMINE/UXO RISK EDUCATION AND REDUCTION The recent drop in the number of landmine/UXO casualties can be credited to effective MRE program so far implemented in Cambodia by mine action stakeholders in general and in specific by CMAC as one of its core activities. As mine action evolved, so did MRE. CMAC’s risk education and reduction strategy realizes that an effective MRE is based upon careful and ongoing assessment of the needs of the affected communities with involvement of existing community structures and local authorities in prioritising tasks for mine action programs. The CBMRR and CBURR programs are proof of translating this concept into practice, whereby the affected communities are empowered to recognize, manage and address the mine/UXO problem on their own terms, through task identification and prioritization, with the support from the demining operators and development partners through the PMAC/MAPU process and to conduct MRE activities as needed in their own community.

A

CMAC Concrete Marking in Banteay Meanchey

MRE Team in the Eastern Regional (ERO) Office educated children in affected area

in Kampong Cham Province

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4.3.1. Overall Goal and Objectives of Mine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction

This work-plan identifies the priority of CMAC’s Mine Risk Education and Reduction activities in 2009 to take an essential step toward effective MRE approach through local community empowerment (CBMRR and CBURR) and awareness building on Mine/UXO problem through the Multi-skill MRE teams. This initiative involves different methods including participatory approach, capacity building and specific consideration toward children. CMAC’s MRE program will continue to implement the priority activities in 2009 as follows: Priority-1: Promote the role and responsibility of the affected communities to provide risk education and reduction strategy to their communities:

o Promote community participation in mine action process through community-based approaches to task selection and prioritization, illustrated by the approach of the current CBMRR and CBURR mechanism.

o Strengthen reporting mine/UXO system from field to the national level. Better link roving tasks with community request such as EOD task and limited clearance requests.

o Encourage and help support MUC networks through means such as the material incentives to the CBMRR/CBURR community networks.

Priority-2: Advocating the mine action, community development and the social service of relevant government departments to contribute more effectively to risk reduction:

o Advocate the integration of MRE and reduction activities in mine action unit, social services of the relevant department and the community development program.

o Continue strengthening capacity of the community MUC networks at village, commune and district levels to be sustainable coordination mechanism for mine/UXO-affected communities.

Mine and UXO Awareness Performance by School Children in Pailin – CMAC-UNICEF Mine/UXO Risk Reduction and Mass

Media Campaign Project

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Priority-3: Continuing to develop appropriate effective MRE approach targeting high risk communities and individual:

o Improve and better target messages focus on risk avoidance by specifically to the high risk group adolescent boys.

o Promote participation amongst the vulnerable individual and household. o Specifically focus on livelihood activities through the implementation of community

development orientation approach. Priority-4: Actively participating and contributing to the implementation of the baseline survey in high impact districts to obtain more reliable information on the remaining landmine and UXO problem to be address.

o Retrain CBMRR on the concept and process of baseline survey; o Act as community focal points for the survey

The key activities in 2009 include:

4.3.2. Community-Based Mine/UXO Risk Reduction Programs (CBMRR and CBURR) Activities of CBMRR: Deploying 5 Provincial Coordinators, 1 Training/Monitoring Officer, 26 District Focal Point Officers (DFP), 528 community networks in the most mine/UXO-affected areas of 230 villages, 83 communes, 25 districts and 6 provinces where those situated at the northwest part of the country.

1. Visit 190,000 households and

reach at least 190,000 families to provide them with mine risk education through the trained CBMRR community networks and assessed their needs for appropriate response of mine action, victim assistance service and community development program.

2. Evaluate and phase out 42

CBMRR low priority targeted villages and instead retarget 42 new high priority villages.

3. Retrain the CBMRR focal points

in the concept and process of baseline survey.

4. Act as community focal points for the baseline survey.

5. Cooperate and coordinate with the survey teams (baseline survey) and the local authorities to obtain quality and reliable information related to the landmines/UXO in the community.

CMAC CBMRR Activities in Banteay Meanchey Province

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6. Update CBMRR village maps and the village technical survey maps regularly to

maintain accurate and reliable information.

7. Integrate CBMRR village action plan into the Commune Investment Plan (CIP) to seek rehabilitation and development support from donors and partners.

8. Actively and closely work with other mine action, victim assistance and community

development agencies to acquire necessary support to risk reduction and development plans.

9. Work closely with the PMAC/MAPU in identifying priorities for the communities and

selecting the highest priority tasks for clearance, based on the local, provincial and national development plans to obtain maximum socio-economic impact.

10. Interact with community development projects to assist with alternative income

generations for groups at risk and victim assistance projects to facilitate the reintegration of individuals injured by mines and UXO.

11. Identify and train the communities on how to provide mine/UXO risk education to new

settlers and groups at risk (adult males, out-of-school children) within their communities.

12. Provide training to community resource persons at village, commune and district level such as village leaders, village development committees, teachers and other influential members to develop their knowledge of mine action responses and their capacity to interact with other mine action components, community development initiatives in their areas and victim assistance activities.

13. Continue to observe and assess the behavioral change among vulnerable groups in the

affected communities, their needs and problems and seek the best solutions to the problems.

Activities of CBURR: Deploying 35 CBURR District Focal Points to cover high UXO-affected districts in the target provinces. Consequently, to increase the number of CBURR networks in the target districts.

1. Conduct 2,400 UXO awareness

briefings attended by an estimated 93,000 people and make 1,560 household visits and reach at least 1,560 families to provide them with UXO risk education and assess their needs for appropriate UXO response.

CMAC CBURR Activities in Kandal Province

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2. Continue the "UXO Risk Reduction through Scrap Metal Dealers (URSMD)" project, awareness on law enforcement to the scrap metal dealers and as well as the scrap metal shop owners by the trained local polices and UXO awareness education scrap metal collectors, dealers by the CBURR district focal points.

3. Continue to improve the capacity of the CBURR networks at district, commune and

village level in order to facilitate access of mine/UXO affected communities to appropriate mine/UXO action, victim assistance and community development responses.

4. Maintain and improve a

public information campaign to raise UXO awareness and support behavioral change among UXO affected communities.

5. Interact with community

development projects to assist with alternative income generations for groups at risk and victim assistance projects to facilitate the reintegration of individuals injured by mines and UXO.

6. Identify and train the

communities on how to provide mine/UXO risk education to new settlers and groups at risk (adult males, out-of-school children) within their communities.

7. Continue to observe and assess the behavioral change among vulnerable groups in the

affected communities, their needs and problems and identify the best solutions to the problems.

Indicators Community empowerment:

1. 42 low priority villages of the current CBMRR targets phased out, 42 new villages with most UXO contamination identified and PLA conducted.

2. Capacity of the CBMRR and CBURR networks and scrap metal dealers strengthened. 3. At least 120 landmine victims will receive appropriate victim assistance services

facilitated by the CBMRR district focal points. 4. At least 80 mine/UXO-affected communities will receive appropriate response to their

community development program, facilitated by CBMRR district focal points. 5. Quarterly meetings and annual workshop conducted to identify areas for improvements.

CMAC MRE Officer held a meeting with CBURR Team in Kampong Speu Province on URSMD Topic

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Mine/UXO risk education & Reduction:

6. At least 15,000 mine/UXO-affected communities receive MRE focusing on risk avoidance through trained CBMRR/CBURR networks.

7. At least 5,000 mine/UXO identified by the affected communities have been reported by the CBMRR/CBURR networks and destroyed CMAC intervention teams.

8. At least 50,000 affected communities and scrap metal collectors received MRE through trained CBMRR/CBURR networks and the scrap metal dealers.

4.3.3. Multiple Mine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction Team

CMAC will continue to deploy 6 multi-skill MRE teams in high casualty provinces to deliver mine/UXO risk education messages specifically targeting high risk groups and provide emergency response in collecting and destroying the hazard items reported by the landmine/UXO-affected communities.

1. Deploy the teams to support the community-based networks, raise awareness on the hazards of landmines and UXO, especially the adolescent boys aged 10-19, and conduct limited clearance for risk reduction.

2. Collect and destroy around 25,200 landmines and UXO reported by communities and

scrap metal collectors/or dealers. 3. Provide at least 300 MRE presentations and conduct 7,200 household visits to first hand

deliver MRE messages about landmine and UXO hazards. This is expected to reach at least 13,000 people in the high risk communities.

4. Deliver MRE messages to children at risk through the child to child initiative 5. Work closely with the local communities and CBMRR/CBURR and the scrap metal

dealers where they exist to identify the risks posed to the communities, determine the priorities and address the risks and priorities in a timely manner to ensure maximum risk reduction and prevention.

6. Cooperate with the local authorities and CBMRR/CBURR to ensure an effective

reporting process whereby the communities are encouraged and empowered to make reports and requests to appropriate mine action operators for mine/UXO actions in their communities to prevent risks and accidents to the villagers and their children.

7. Coordinate and cooperate with the local Police and local Armed Forces in order to ensure

effective and timely information flow as well as request handling. 8. Contribute to the prevention of mine/UXO casualties through the wide dissemination of

mine/UXO accident prevention message. 9. Advocate for mine/UXO victims and mine affected communities and to encourage

support for mine/ UXO activities.

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10. Implement an awareness campaign among staff of NGOs and other agencies working in high-risk areas.

Indicators:

Approx. 300 MRE sessions are delivered reaching an audience of approx. 13,000 people. At least 25,200 of mine/UXO will be immediately collected and destroyed Presentations are delivered to villagers with a wide range of educational techniques and

messages to ensure that the delivered information is captured and understood by local population.

Basic assessment of the needs of the population living in the contaminated areas, enabling the preparation of future operational strategy, is carried out.

Further reduction in civilian UXO/land mine related incidents by the end of 2009 compared to year 2008 is achieved.

Impact of mine/UXO risk education and reduction is assessed. 4.3.4. Mass Media Campaign

With the help of the mass media, CMAC can promote mine risk education to a wider audience through TV/radio spots and the printing materials, posters and billboards. These messages constantly remind villagers of the dangers they face in their daily activities. CMAC in 2009 will continue to implement a comprehensive mass media campaign to reach millions of people in the mine/UXO affected communities to provide them risk education and prevention as well as to create a culture of safe behaviours among the groups at risks. Main Activities:

1. Produce public information campaign and other printing materials to raise awareness on the mine/UXO problem and support behavior change among mine/UXO-affected communities.

2. Repair existing Mine/UXO awareness billboard and updating message reflect to the

current activity of the people are at risk to mine /UXO. . 3. Produce mine/UXO risk education reading materials targeted for children and UXO

collectors.

CMAC DU4 MRE Team conducted a Mass Media Campaign activities in Siem Reap Province

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4. Coordinate with the MRE technical working group to improve, expand and promote the mine/UXO awareness campaign to a reach wider audience through the mine awareness day 24 February.

Indicators:

10 Mine/UXO awareness billboards repaired and messages upgraded to promote

awareness knowledge on mine/UXO accident among the people are being settled and/or taken risk activities due to livelihood in the mine/UXO-affected areas.

5 new mine/UXO awareness billboards will be produced to place in the high UXO-

affected areas in the province of Kratie and Kompong Cham.

8,500 (XL size) T-shirts and 8,000 (S/M size) T-shirts will be produced for raising awareness on mine/UXO problem and will be also promoted Mine/UXO community networks.

4,000 note books will be produced in 2009. The essence of the note book will be focus on

the danger of landmine/UXO, especially for the children in rural or remote areas. 4.4. TRAINING, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN MINE ACTION With the international community and CMAC focus increasingly placed on combating the damaging effects of ERW and cluster munitions, CMAC will continue to make greater efforts to ensure that its personnel and experts are equipped with the right skills and experience to deal with ERW including cluster munitions in the coming years. Also CMAC will make sure appropriate technology is utilized to ensure the effectiveness, efficiency and safety of ERW operations. This will be achieved through comprehensive and well-planned training, research and development activities. The focus of CMAC in the coming years will be the centre of excellence, regional and international training and a very strong base in research and development facilities, skills and experience. In this respect, CMAC looks ahead to 2009 as a very busy year packed with training, research and development activities. 4.4.1. Training, Research and Development Goal and Objectives CMAC's goal is to remain a leading landmine action organization with a high standard of operational safety, quality and efficiency and become a centre of excellence in terms of training, research and development to maintain high expertise, appropriate use of technology and competitive advantages in landmine action. In other words, CMAC aims to be a centre which the international landmine action community can learn and draw experience from.

SHIBUARA Deep Search Machine Testing at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

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Training, research and development objectives include:

1. Prepare the Training Centre to become the Centre of Excellence in landmine action training.

2. Upgrade the training resources

including the trainers, training facilities, training materials and curricula.

3. Prepare and seek opportunities to

offer regional and international training to officers and operators from other landmine affected countries.

4. Continue to find innovative

methods and technology through research and development to improve the demining quality, safety and efficiency.

4.4.2. Training Activities The Training Centre:

1. Upgrade the Training Centre, with the technical assistance from the Japanese experts and New Zealand support, to meet the requirements for international training and to house multi-purpose research and development facilities.

2. Conduct an assessment, design

an action plan and carefully execute the plan to turn the Training Centre to be the Centre of Excellence in landmine action, especially with specific EOD focus.

3. Improve the training resources including the physical facilities, trainers, training manuals

and curricula to meet an internationally accepted standard.

UPEX740 Training at CMAC Training Center - Kampong Chhnang

Mapping and GPS Training Course at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

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4. Continue to strengthen the management skills of the Training Centre management, both in terms of day-to-day and strategic management, to ensure the Centre serves the best interests of the landmine action community.

5. Continue to enhance the skills

and quality of the trainers, both in technical, language and pedagogical skills, to meet the accepted standard for international training.

6. Continue to improve and

document quality training curricula and manuals to ensure that they meet quality and skill requirements for both domestic and international training.

7. Continue to improve the

information management system within the Training Centre.

8. Create a resource centre in landmine action within the Training Centre.

9. Plan and deliver domestic training (training deminers and operators from other demining

organizations inside the country) as well regional and international training.

10. Respond to opportunities to conduct training needs assessments outside the country in cooperation with donors and/or partners to prepare for potential international training.

11. Use the Training Centre as the

monitoring, evaluation and improvement mechanism for demining and EOD operations in Cambodia.

12. Market the Training Centre

through the website to attract international interests.

Deep Search Training at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

EOD Level II Training Course at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

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Training:

1. Prepare and deliver refresher and skill training courses attended by approximately 700 trainees throughout the year in order to strengthen the technical skills and the front line and middle management.

2. Continue to conduct training

needs assessment to ensure that training programs and curricula are designed and tailored to meet specific field requirements.

3. Strengthen the operational

and field management capacity of the front line and middle managers through formal and on-the-job training and exchange program in order to improve operational safety, quality and efficiency. Areas of concern for front line and middle managers include:

minefield management and planning; toolbox management; day-to-day operational management; productivity management; cost analysis and operational efficiency; problem-solving and crisis management; human resources management; maintenance and care management; and safety, health and environmental management (SHE)

4. Accommodate priority training; including the EOD training and refresher one-man –

one-lane drill training to meet the requirement of change within CMAC. 5. Design and conduct specialized EOD training courses to meet the EOD-specific skill

requirements and fill in the skill gaps. 6. Produce and execute a multi-skill training plan to timely prepare CMAC's qualified staff

for expected future expansion in specific skills (such as MDD/EDD, EOD, etc).

7. Strengthen the culture and attitude of accountability and professionalism of all managerial and operational staff through appropriate behavior/management training, identification of needs and motivation/discipline reinforcement measures.

Bomb Locator Refresher Course at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

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8. Strengthen the field management training through more exchange programs and

exposures to better practices. 9. Increase national staff

capacity in both operational and managerial skills to ensure that they are suitable and qualified for performance of their job, especially targeting the international level.

10. Strengthen the role and

performance of landmine action management to gain competitive advantages in the new emerging competitive environment in landmine action through basic market and economic training and exposure.

11. Send staff to external or specialized training as appropriate and when opportunities come. 12. Cooperate with partners and donors to run specific training courses to meet specific

needs mutually identified by the partners, donors and CMAC. 13. Seek opportunities to

deliver domestic, regional and international training services in order to share skills and experience within the landmine action community.

14. Be ready to send trainers

to other countries to offer training services as opportunities come.

15. Continue to intake new

graduates and other qualified people into internship to groom

Basic Demining Course Closing Ceremony at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

Battle Area Clearance Course Closing Ceremony at CMAC Training Center -Kampong Chhnang

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them for their future employment within CMAC.

16. Continue to train the national police and armed forces in landmine/UXO identification, landmine/UXO information management and risk education and reduction strategies so they can work actively to contribute to risk reduction efforts.

17. Conduct an evaluation on the training impact on staff performance, attitude and

professionalism and identify measures to address the gaps. 4.4.3. Research and Development Objectives and Activities

1. Design and conduct research and

development plans and activities, in conjunction with donors and partners, to improve the demining quality, safety and efficiency.

2. Continue with the existing

research and development projects and activities, such as Explosive Harvesting Program, to ensure their smooth running and productive outputs.

3. Smoothly and effectively manage

and conduct, in cooperation with the Japan International Cooperation System, the Project for Research and Development of Landmine Clearance Related Equipment, Phase II, to conduct integration trial of demining equipment.

4. Work with the US Department of

Defense Humanitarian Demining R&D Program to conduct test and evaluation of landmine detectors and mechanical demining equipment.

5. Test and trial UXO excavation

technology to assist ERW operations.

6. Test, if feasible, the terrain survey

technology (such as unmanned aerial vehicle) to assist technical survey process and deployment of demining machines.

Memining Machine Komatsu at the Research and Development Site Phase II in Battambang Province

Memining Machines Hitachi Push Type and Swing Type at the Research and Development Site Phase II

in Battambang Province

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7. Design and seek

opportunities to submit appropriate proposals for new research and development projects to donors and partners.

8. Improve, expand and tailor

the test and evaluation facilities to meet the specific requirements of research and development projects.

9. Offer the research and

development facilities and skills to international users and partners to conduct test and evaluation of demining related equipment.

10. Enhance the skills and experience of the research and development staff in designing,

managing and evaluating research and development projects as well as producing test and evaluation progress and final reports.

11. Continue to review and design standards operating requirements (SOR) for demining

equipment and seek opportunities and donor/partner support to test and evaluate them in Cambodia.

12. Maintain close links with

international research and development organizations as well as test and evaluation agencies.

13. Enhance CMAC's research

and development guidelines and test and evaluation manuals, which are practical and easily understandable operators and international partners.

14. Link research and

development activities to the applications of CMAC's toolboxes for potential future integration as well as to find better ways, based

Memining Machine Hitachi Swing Type at the Research and Development Site Phase II in Battambang Province

Memining Machine Hitachi Push Type at the Research and Development Site Phase II in Battambang Province

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on knowledge gained from test and evaluation, to use these toolboxes in the operational field.

15. Continue to monitor and evaluate the performance of brush cutters used under different

conditions to identify their defects and strengths and seek appropriate solutions and actions.

16. Conduct cost analysis of key demining tools such as brush cutters and MDD. 17. Record all types of landmines/UXO found in Cambodia under different conditions and

locations in order to establish a reference book for research and development purposes. 18. Document all research and development process and outputs for future reference.

There are a number of research projects will be carried out in 2009. Those research projects are: No. Project Status 1. HSTAMIDS training (10 units at Siem Reap) Continue from 2008 2. ALIS New 3. Golden west (UXO harvesting) Continue from 2008 4. Diving Program Suspended but might re-activate again 5. Wind energy New 6. Solar energy New 7. Re-chargable battery Continue from 2008 8. Racking (assisted by BC) New 9. Translate course material into English Continue from 2008 10. Update EOD handbook Continue from 2008 11. Multi-tool shifter bucket (US tools) Continue from 2008

Memining Machines Hitachi Push Type in the Real Minefield Testing Site Phase II

in Battambang Province

Memining Machine Komatsu Push Type in the Real Minefield Testing Site Phase II

in Battambang Province

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5. WORK PLAN BY PROJECTS

5.1. PROJECTS AND BUDGET SUMMARY Financial, in-kind and technical assistance by donors and partners to CMAC usually comes in the form of bilateral and multi-lateral projects. On the one hand, these projects have provided reasonably sustainable funding to support CMAC operations. However, on the other hand, this also poses pressing challenges in the project management as well as stretching implications on resource and deployment planning. In 2009, CMAC will implement a total of at least 31 projects, based on the current available information. They come in three different categories: support to demining, survey and MRE activities; demining and development, research and development, and provision of equipment and technical assistance. These projects vary in size, durations and nature of support. However, they all contribute to the same goal: supporting CMAC's demining operations and capacity building of CMAC's human resources. No Project Locations Donor/Partner Remarks I. Mine and UXO Clearance, Survey and Mine/UXO Risk Education 1 UNDP "Clearing for

Results" DU1, DU2, DU4, ERO

UNDP/Multi-donors*

Clearing for Results in Banteay Meanchey, Battambang, Preah Vihear, Kampong Thom and eastern provinces

2 NPA (Netherlands) DU1, DU2 Netherlands Project to support and enhance technical survey in Battambang and Siem Reap

3 AustCARE DU1 Australia Integrated demining and development in Banteay Meanchey

4 Baseline Survey Project DU1, 2, 3 UNDP/Multi-donors*

Baseline survey activities to support national landmine clearance

5 Japan-Grassroots DU2 Japan - Humanitarian demining in Battambang - Officially ends in March 2009

6 Japan-Grassroots DU2 Japan - Supports demining machines and manual teams - Period: January – September 2008

7 Peacebuilding Project DU2 Japan - Integrated landmine clearance and landmine victim assistance and provision of demining machines - Three years starting from October 2008

8 Japan-JMAS DU2 Japan Community-based demining in Battambang 9 US-DU3 DU3 USA Humanitarian demining in Pailin and Samlot 10 Japan-Grassroots DU4 Japan Humanitarian demining in Kampong Thom and Preah

Vihear 11 Germany-DU6 DU6 Germany Humanitarian demining in Siem Reap and Oddar

Meanchey 12 ECOSORN DU1, DU2,

DU4 EC Integrated demining and development in north-west

provinces (ECOSORN Project) 13 Japan-JMAS ERO, HQ Japan EOD, CBURR 14 Japan-ASEAN

Integration Fund ERO, DU1 Japan - Humanitarian demining and UXO clearance

- Officially ends in March 2009 15 US-CMAC for UXO

Clearance ERO US - ERW clearance operations in eastern provinces

16 BHP Billiton CSU BHP Billiton Mineral Exploration in Mondul Kiri 17 PGS CSU PGS Mineral Exploration around Tonle Sap Lake 18 MAG (MDD) DU2, DU3,

DU4 MAG Renting of CMAC's MDD teams for MAG operations

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19 UNICEF All DU's UNICEF MRE, CBMRR 20 Peaceboat DU4 Peaceboat Expected (demining and school construction) 21 CMAC-HIB ERO HIB Expected (Proactive UXO clearance in eastern provinces)II. Demining and Development 22 GEJ: Good Earth Japan DU2 Hitachi Post-clearance development 23 JMAS-CMAC CID DU2 Komatsu Community integrated development (CID) III. Research and Development 24 HSTAMIDS Training DU2 NVESD HSTAMIDS training and trial (GPR detector) 25 ALIS Training TC Tohoku University

(Japan) ALIS training and trial (GPR detector)

26 Explosive Harvesting Program

HQ,TC USA/Golden West R&D in explosive harvesting

IV. Provision of Equipment and Technical Assistance 27 GTC (MDD) HQ, TC Sweden Provision of MDD and technical assistance 28 Technical Cooperation HQ, CWS Japan/JICA Provision of technical advisors 29 Technical Cooperation HQ, TC New Zealand/QSI Provision of technical advisors to TC 30 AYAD/VIDA HQ, DU4 AusAID Provision of volunteers 31 Grant Aid Phase V All Japan/JICA Provision of equipment to support demining Total Projects 2009: 31 * Multi-donors to UNDP include Australia, Canada, Spain and UNA-USA Adopt-A-Minefield. In 2009, CMAC's total budgetary plan reaches over USD 21 million, of which around USD 13,802,187 is expected for operational budget and the remaining USD 7,250,000 is for equipment and technical assistance in estimated terms. Of the USD 13,802,187 expected to support operations, around USD 10,609,667 has been confirmed based on the best available information at the time of preparing this work plan. However, this figure may change based on the real funding situation. This also indicates that CMAC still has a budgetary shortfall of USD 3,193,120, which needs to be addressed. Of this, CMAC has submitted proposals to donors for USD 2,350,337, and CMAC is still looking for new sources of funding to address the remaining USD 842,783. Budgetary Plan 2009 (in USD)

Description Expected Confirmed Shortfall I. Operational Budget 1. Bilateral Donors 8,603,902 6,252,755 2,351,1472. UNDP (Clearing for Results) 4,848,885 4,006,912 841,9733. Royal Government 350,000 350,000 0.00

Total: 13,802,187 10,609,667 3,193,120II. Equipment and Technical Assistance (Estimated) 4. Japan's Equipment Grant Aid 5,500,000 Japan 5. Research and Development projects 300,000 US; Tohoku University 6. Technical Assistance 1,300,000 Japan, New Zealand 7. AYAD and VIDA 150,000 Volunteers from Australia

Total (Estimated): 7,250,000 Grand Total Budgetary Plan 2009: 21,052,787

While many projects follow a January-December timeframe, some follow the timeframe of the donors' fiscal year. They are also attached with external auditing or monitoring conditions. Most projects are

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based on the project proposals submitted to the donors and Memorandum of Understanding or Project Agreements detailing the scope of work, budget, expected outputs and other conditions. Since most of these projects already a separate detailed Proposal, MOU or Project Agreement, only the summary profiles of the key projects are described in this Work Plan. 5.2. CLEARING FOR RESULTS PROJECT UNDP has played an important role in Government–Donor coordination for Mine Action sector, most recently as the lead donor facilitator for the Government-Donor Mine Action Technical Working Group. The continued UN/UNDP commitment to Mine Action in Cambodia is reflected in the UN Development Assistance Framework and in the UNDP Country Program 2006-2010. UNDP’s objective is to strengthen process in mine action, with emphasis on making land available to the rural poor. The Clearing for Results Project was initiated by UNDP and the Royal Government of Cambodia to redefine its partnership strategy in managing donor funding. This partnership strategy is output-based, meaning that the Project’s achievements will be primarily measured in terms of productivity, efficiency, and socio-economic returns. This clearly shifts the focus from process management to result management. This partnership strategy also calls for competitive bidding for mine action resources when there is a reliable and transparent bidding process in place. However, at this stage, UNDP has awarded CMAC as its implementing partner of the Clearing for Results Project through a comprehensive evaluation of all demining operators in Cambodia.

The new initiative immediately drew attention of three major donors, namely Australia, Canada and UNA-USA’s Adopt-A-Minefield, to support the Project. Spain also joined the donor team in 2008. In 2006, CMAC received a total of 3,450,000 US dollars from UNDP for Clearing for Results Project, and in 2007 the figure rose to 4,120,000 USD and CMAC received another 4,000,000 USD in 2008. Summary progress made since the start of the project (2006-2008):

- Cleared: 21,844,907 m² of landmine contamination area and 1,949,617 m² of UXO contamination area.

- Found and destroyed: 28,703 AP mines, 607 AT mines, and 88,690 UXO. 5.2.1. Project Goal The main goal of this project is to clear landmine and UXO affected land to support risk reduction and rehabilitation of the affected communities. These are based on the priorities determined through the national and provincial land management mechanism (PMAC and MAPU) so that the vulnerable and landless poor can enjoy fairer socio-economic benefits and return to normal livelihoods to reconstruct their lives and communities. 5.2.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Clearing for Results - Donor(s): Australia, Canada, Spain, UNA-USA Adopt-A-Minefield)

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- Partners(s): UNDP - Project period: January – December 2009 - Locations of deployment: Banteay Meanchey, Battambang, Pursat, Preah Vihear, Kampong

Thom and other provinces based on emergency requests. - Budget (confirmed for 2009):

No. Component Component Cost 1 Mine/UXO Clearance 3,187,0802 Survey 209,5363 Mine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction 180,9844 Training 107,3285 Administration 321,984 TOTAL USD 4,006,912

- Teams deployed and key expected outputs:

No Description Number TARGET

of

Teams Clearance

(m²) AR (m²) UXO Marking

(m) Sessions Audience 1 MINE/UXO CLEARANCE

MP 6 1,944,000 SLD 5 1,500,000 LLD 3 900,000 CMC 4 480,000 BC 6 2,160,000 MRE 5 51,000 3,000 EOD 4 98,400 16,800 SUB-TOTAL CLEARANCE: 7,133,400 19,800

2 SURVEY TS small team 2 18,000,000 240,000 TSC 5 900,000 SUB-TOTAL SURVEY: 18,900,000 240,000

3 MINE/UXO RISK EDUCATION AND REDUCTION (MRE) MRE 5 720 57,600 CBMRR 8 CBURR 4 SUB-TOTAL MRE: 720 57,600

5.3. INTEGRATED MINE ACTION AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN BANTEAY MEANCHEY Starting from March 2006, Austcare, with the financial support from the Australian Government through AusAID, selected CMAC to be a partner in a three-year demining and development program to provide integrated mine action and development support to villagers at risk in Tmar Pouk and Svay Chek districts of Banteay Meanchey to give them personal security and enhance their economic and development opportunities aimed for maximum poverty reduction. On the basis of this partnership agreement, CMAC has implemented this mine action program since March 2006. The initial three-year phase concluded in June 2008. Following an evaluation, CMAC DU1 – Austcare Project has been extended for another year into 2009 but with a much reduced budget. The new project

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2008-2009 covers only 1 Community-Based Demining Platoon and one Technical Survey Team for a few months. Summary progress made since the start of the project (2006-2008):

- Cleared: 1,632,237 m² of landmine contamination area and 5,425 m² of UXO contamination area.

- Found and destroyed: 1,282 AP mines, 10 AT mines and 381 UXO. 5.3.1. Project’s Goal The goal of this project is, through mine action activities, to bring about personal security to the people living in mine/UXO affected communities and to support partner's community rehabilitation and development program designed to reactivate family livelihood, social, economic and development activities in a safe manner. 5.3.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Integrated Mine Action and Development Program in Banteay Meanchey - Donor(s): AusAID - Partner(s): Austcare - Project period: August 2008 – June 2009 - Teams deployed: 1 CBD and 1 Technical Survey team - Locations of deployment: Banteay Meanchey province. - Budget: USD 95,927 - Key expected Outputs: 212,500 m² - Number of staff: 38 personnel

5.4. TECHNICAL SURVEY AND LAND RELEASE PROJECT In 2008, NPA and CMAC started to co-operate in the implementation of the Technical Survey and Land Release project, which aimed at enhancing the technical survey and developing land release concept and SOP's based on international experience and standards. The project activities were further supported by GICHD in term of advisory service in land release. Summary progress made since the start of the project (2008):

- Surveyed: 55 villages in Battambang and Siem Reap. - Number of minefields identified: 514 - Area of contamination identified: 124,507,476 m² - Area reduction: 201,517,390 m²

In 2009, NPA plans to partner with CMAC for another nine months to fully develop and introduce the land release concept and SOP's. Once completed, CMAC plans to submit this land release concept to CMAA to be adopted as the national land release policy and national standards. 5.4.1. Project’s Goal The goal of this project is to develop and introduce the concept and practice of land release to return land to the needy communities through technical survey and non-technical survey methods without having to fully clear every suspected area.

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5.4.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Technical Survey and Land Release Project - Donor(s): Norwegian Government - Partner(s): NPA - Project period: January – September 2009 - Teams deployed: 3 Technical survey teams - Locations of deployment: Battambang and Siem Reap - Budget: USD 110,000 - Key expected outputs: survey of 3 districts; land release concept developed and approved by

CMAA - Number of staff: 17 personnel

5.5. PROJECT FOR THE BASELINE SURVEY TO SUPPORT ARTICLE 5 EXTENSION REQUEST AND MINE CLEARANCE PLAN IN CAMBODIA As one of the State Party of the "Ottawa Convention" or "Mine Ban Treaty", the RGC has an obligation under the Treaty’s Article 5 to ensure the destruction of all anti-personnel mines in mined areas under its jurisdiction or control, as soon as possible but not later than ten years after the entry into force1. With deadline approaching and extensive landmines remained, the RGC has the requirement to seek extension. Doing so requires accurate and reliable mined area information. To meet this legal and moral responsibility and the quest for efficiency, CMAA and the three operators have come to an agreement that a baseline survey is an appropriate tool to deliver the intended outputs to be used to support future mine clearance plan to meet the Article 5 Extension Request. Areas following the baseline survey will be classified based on common survey protocols agreed as Mined Area (classification A), Residual Threat Area (classification B), and End State Land (classification C). These classifications allow the Government to prioritise demining intervention more effectively and to release land areas that are safe for productive use. To contribute to this purpose, CMAC submitted a proposal to UNDP for a project to carry out baseline survey in 16 districts in the next one year to provide survey findings for subsequent clearance prioritization. This project is for a twelve-month period. 5.5.1. Project’s Goal The goal of this project is “to obtain accurate and reliable mine/UXO information as well as to release land where reliably appropriate with the use of CMAC baseline survey teams integrated with demining tools in contribution to the Royal Government's effort to meet the Ottawa Mine Ban Treaty”. 5.5.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Baseline Survey to Support Article 5 Extension Request and Mine Clearance Plan in Cambodia

1 Ottawa Mine Ban Treaty went in force 1 March 1999

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- Donor(s): TBC - Partner(s): UNDP - Project period: 12 months, expectedly starting from April 2009. - Teams deployed: 8 Baseline Survey teams, 4 Mobile Platoons, 4 Brush Cutter teams - Locations of deployment: 16 priority districts determined by CMAA - Budget: USD 1,130,337 - Key expected outputs: survey of 16 priority districts determined by CMAA, land classified and

marked according to common survey protocols. - Number of staff: 125 personnel, and 8 SSA

5.6. KUSANONE PROJECT TO SUPPORT HUMANITARIAN DEMINING IN DU2 The Government of Japan has been supporting CMAC's Demining Unit 2 under the Kusanone scheme since 2001, and this financial support has made significant and valuable contributions to the Royal Government's efforts to combat the landmine and UXO problem and to realize the Government's vision of zero-victims by the year 2012. As statistics indicate in the CMVIS reports, Battambang remains the highest casualty province in Cambodia as large amounts of land are heavily contaminated with landmines and UXO. After many years of operations, tens of thousands of hectares of land have been cleared, but a lot of demining work still needs to be done in this province. This Kusanone grant for DU2 started from March 2008 and will conclude in March 2009. There has been no indication of the continuation of this project in 2009, even though CMAC already submitted a request to the Government of Japan. However, the Government of Japan has indicated her intention to support CMAC under the Kusanone grant scheme with a similar project to support demining machines and manual clearance teams in Battambang province. Summary progress made since the start of the project (2005-2008):

- Cleared: 11,783,642 m² of landmine contamination area. - Found and destroyed: 19,509 AP mines, 701 AT mines and 46,912 UXO.

5.7. KUSANONE PROJECT TO SUPPORT DEMINING MACHINES AND MANUAL CLEARANCE TEAMS IN DU2 As mentioned above, the Kusanone grant for DU2 starting from March 2008 will conclude in March 2009. There has been no indication of the continuation of this project in 2009, even though CMAC already submitted a request to the Government of Japan. However, the Government of Japan has indicated her intention to support CMAC under the Kusanone grant scheme with a similar project to support demining machines and manual clearance teams in Battambang province. CMAC has successfully tested and trialed three demining machines of Hitachi and Komatsu types. The operational trial of the demining machines officially ended in November 2008, and through this trial the machines demonstrated remarkable performance and proved capable of field operations in Cambodia. Upon this successful test and evaluation, CMAC issued acceptance letters for all the three machines.

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To continue the operations of the demining machines, attached with manual clearance teams, CMAC has submitted to the Government of Japan a request for a Kusanone grant to support these operations. This is a nine-month project starting from January 2009. 5.7.1. Project’s Goal The goal of this project is to bring about human security and to improve the livelihood of people living in mine affected communities through clearance of landmines for agriculture development in selected mine-affected villages in Battambang province. 5.7.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Project to Support Demining Machines and Manual Clearance Teams - Donor(s): Government of Japan - Project period: 9 months, expectedly starting from January 2009. - Teams deployed: 3 Demining Machines, 3 Mobile Platoons, 1 Brush Cutter team, 1 Long

Leash MDD team, and 1 Field Support Team - Locations of deployment: Battambang province (Sdao District) - Budget: USD 619,904 - Key expected outputs: approx. 2,949,000 m² - Number of staff: 115 personnel, and 8 SSA

5.8. INTEGRATED LANDMINE CLEARANCE AND LANDMINE VICTIM ASSISTANCE AND PROVISION OF DEMINING MACHINES CMAC has successfully tested and trialed three demining machines of Hitachi and Komatsu types. This research and development project was supported by the Government of Japan. The operational trial under Phase II of the R&D project ended in November 2008, and through this trial the machines demonstrated remarkable performance and proved capable of field operations in Cambodia. Upon this successful test and evaluation, CMAC issued acceptance letters for all the three machines. CMAC realizes that these machines will help CMAC further substantially increase demining outputs. Recognizing this potential, CMAC has submitted to the Government of Japan a request to both procure additional machines and an operational budget to support the operations of these machines for three years. The first component of this project is the procurement of 8 additional demining machines. The second component of the project is mine clearance using the demining machines in integration with other demining tools namely brush cutters, manual clearance platoons and mine detection dogs. The integration of these teams in demining activities will ensure that mine clearance is effective and cost efficient. Thirdly, the project will offer the affected communities and victims of landmines basic need assistance in term of rural development assistance and small scale infrastructure development such as community ponds, irrigation systems, and access roads. Assistance to improve agriculture outputs will also be provided. This is more about involving the members of the affected community, making them actors of the process and their future, for a sustainable development. The machines and their supporting teams will be potentially deployed mainly in two districts in Battambang provinces: Bavel and Ratanak Mondul. However, operational locations can be expanded to other areas based on actual needs assessment.

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5.8.1. Project’s Goal The overall goal of this project is to contribute to peace-building and community development through clearance and release of a vast area of contaminated land for the community and provide basic rural development support to the needy community to prepare them toward a more sustainable development in post-clearance areas. 5.8.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Integrated Landmine Clearance and Landmine Victim Assistance and Provision of Demining Machines

- Donor(s): Government of Japan - Project period: 36 months, expectedly starting from October 2009. - Budget: USD 14,555,817 (three years) - Key expected outputs: 17,520,000 m² (three years); a number of landmine victims supported - Number of staff: approx. 224 personnel - Teams deployed:

Year 1 Number of teams deployed Hitachi Push 1 Hitachi Swing 1 Komatsu 1 Mobile Platoon 2 Brush Cutter 2 LL-MDD 2 Year 2 Hitachi Push 1 Hitachi Swing 3 Komatsu 2 Mobile Platoon 4 Brush Cutter 3 LL-MDD 3 Year 3 Hitachi Push 1 Hitachi Swing 3 Komatsu 2 Mobile Platoon 4 Brush Cutter 3 LL-MDD 3

5.9. CMAC – JMAS UXO CLEARANCE AND COMMUNITY-BASED DEMINING ACTIVITIES JMAS's support to CMAC's EOD operations started in 2002 with 1 EOD team in Prey Veng and gradually increased to 7 EOD teams and 16 CBURR in fiscal year 2006. In the same year, in addition to the support to EOD, JMAS also expanded its support to community-based demining in Battambang.

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Apart from CBD operations in Battambang, all support to EOD operations concentrates in eastern provinces. JMAS has made very important contributions in strengthening EOD response capacity and CBURR information network in effort to improve response capacity to address the UXO threats to the communities. Many key achievements have been made in partnership with CMAC which also serve as a good experience and best practice for EOD operations countrywide. Summary progress made since the start of the project (from 2005 for UXO clearance operations and 2006 for CBD operations):

- Cleared: 1,061,544 m² of landmine contaminated area - Found and destroyed: 4,427 AP mines, 202 AT mines, and 115,933 UXO.

5.9.1. Projects' Goal The goal of these projects are to bring about personal security to the communities living in mine/UXO affected areas and to reduce the number of casualties caused by landmines and UXO, to enable safe access to resources and to provide safe land to support rehabilitation and development activities within the affected communities. 5.9.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: UXO Clearance and Community-Based Demining Activities - Donor(s): Government of Japan - Partner(s): JMAS - Project period: CBD Project in Battambang: July 2008 – July 2009

EOD Project in eastern province: October 2008 – October 2009 - Teams deployed: 3 CBD Platoons, 8 EOD teams, 17 CBURR, 4 Field Supervisors. - Locations of deployment: Battambang, Kampong Speu, Kandal, Svay Rieng, Kampong Cham - Budget: USD 670,502.50 - Key expected outputs: approx. 350 UXO per EOD team per month, 30 EOD requests per

CBURR per month, and 17,500 m² of clearance per CBD platoon per month. - Number of staff: approx. 130 personnel.

In addition, JMAS also provides technical assistance in the form of field technical advisors to support the field operations, both in CBD and EOD. 5.10. THE HUMANITARIAN DEMINING PROGRAM IN PAILIN AND BATTAMBANG The Government of the United States has been supporting humanitarian demining activities in Pailin since 2001, and the support extended to Samlot in 2005. This support has so far covered a humanitarian landmine action program focusing on clearing landmines, delivering landmine/UXO risk education, conducting technical survey and landmine marking as well as providing technical, field management and leadership training to improve the management of demining activities in DU 3. From August 2006, a new project management arrangement has been adopted by the US Government to support CMAC. This new arrangement will be implemented though a contractor to work closely with CMAC and provide capacity building to CMAC's DU 3 through the dispatch of a full time Technical Advisor. DynCorps was selected as a contractor to manage mine action program in Cambodia, specifically support to CMAC. Summary progress made since the start of the project (2001-2008):

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- Cleared: 20,086,199 m² of landmine contamination area. - Found and destroyed: 33,178 AP mines, 361 AT mines, 31,861 UXO.

In 2009, this Project will enter the third year of the US support under the new arrangement. With a trend of reduced landmine casualties while the number of casualties caused by ERW (UXO) still persistently fluctuates and is expectedly on the rise, CMAC and the US Government would like to see an increased response to UXO in the current coverage areas and a potential expansion of this response to neighboring districts as well as to other parts of the country. To realize this commitment, the US Government has allocated a substantial amount of money to train CMAC deminers in new skills to deal with EOD and BAC tasks. A transition plan has been developed and put in place to achieve the training, formation of EOD/BAC teams, deployment of the teams and eventual transition of DU 3 from sole demining to cover UXO clearance as well. From September 2008 to August 2009, CMAC will implement a gradual and stable transition plan to slowly shift DU 3 from conducting sole demining to covering both demining and BAC activities in the target areas, with potential expansion to neighboring districts in Battambang Province as well as to other parts of Cambodia. 5.10.1. Project’s Goal The goal of this project is to contribute to risk reduction through clearance of landmines and UXO in a proactive approach to enable the affected communities in the target areas to expand their social and economic opportunities and support community development in the areas. 5.10.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: The Humanitarian Demining Program in Pailin and Battambang - Donor(s): the US Government - Partner(s): DynCorp International - Project period: September 2008 – August 2009 - Teams deployed: 5 Mobile Platoons (reduced to 2 at the end of the project), 3 Brush Cutter

teams (reduced to 2 from January 2009, 1 Short Leash MDD team, 1 CMC team, 2 EOD teams (planned to increase to 4), 3 Technical Survey teams (reduced to 2), 4 CBMRR, 5 CBURR, 4 BAT (battle area clearance) teams and 1 BAV (battle area clearance by village) team.

- Locations of deployment: Pailin and Battambang provinces - Budget: USD 1,800,000 (including 200,000 for training) - Key expected outputs: approx. 2,442,000 m² of landmine contamination area and 1,750,000 m²

of UXO contamination area (total 4,192,000 m²) - Number of staff: 225 personnel.

5.11. THE PROJECT FOR SUPPORTING HUMANITARIAN DEMINING ACTIVITIES IN KAPONG THOM, ODDAR MEANCHEY AND PREAH VIHEAR PROVINCES The Government of Japan started to support humanitarian demining activities in Demining Unit 4 under the Kusanone funding scheme in October 2005 and continue into 2008. Since the start, the project has made the following progress:

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- Cleared: 10,760,451 m² of landmine contamination area. - Found and destroyed: 4,955 AP mines, 53 AT mines, and 24,059 UXO.

In fiscal year 2009, this project will enter its fourth year of operations. This is an essential demining project to clear archeological sites in Preah Vihear and Kampong Thom as well as to support CMAC’s activities aimed towards zero landmine and UXO victims and enable community developments in the affected communities. It should be remarked that the Provinces of Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear have sound potentials for tourism with many archeological sites and ancient temples. 5.11.1. Project’s Goal The humanitarian mine action project funded by the Government of Japan through the Kusanone fund will focus on mine action activities aimed toward zero victims in the target provinces, to restore access to archeological sites and ancient temples to promote tourism, and to support rehabilitation and development of the affected communities toward better economic opportunities and improvements. The goal of this project is to move towards zero victims caused by landmines and UXO in the target provinces so family livelihood, social, economic and development activities as well as promotion of tourism can take place in a safe manner. 5.11.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: The Project for Supporting Humanitarian Demining Activities in Kapong Thom, Oddar Meanchey and Preah Vihear Provinces

- Donor(s): The Government of Japan - Project period: January – December 2009 - Teams deployed: 3 Mobile Platoons, 1 Brush Cutter teams, 2 EOD teams, 1 Technical Survey

team. - Locations of deployment: Kampong Thom, Oddar Meanchey and Preah Vihear provinces - Budget: USD 615,945. - Key expected outputs: approx. 1,416,000 m² of landmine contamination area and approx. 7,200

UXO found and destroyed. - Number of staff: 125 personnel.

5.12. HUMANITARIAN DEMINING IN SIEM REAP AND ODDAR MEANCHEY This project is another phase of the continued support by the Government of Germany to CMAC DU6 to support humanitarian demining in Siem Reap and Oddar Meanchey. This project aims to reduce the number of victims caused by mines and UXO, restore and improve access to archeological sites and ancient temples to promote tourism, and enable community developments in the affected communities in the said provinces. It should be noted that Germany has been providing consistent and gradually increased funding support to CMAC DU6 since September 1999. In 2009, this project will see a further slight increase in the budget provided to DU6 for this project. Since of the start of support to DU6, this project has made the following achievements (1999-2008):

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- Cleared: 22,306,655 m² of landmine contamination area and 825,968 m² of UXO contamination area.

- Found and destroyed: 25,559 AP mines, 260 AT mines, and 90,337 UXO. 5.12.1. Project’s Goal The humanitarian demining project funded by the Government of Germany will focus on mine action activities aimed to achieve maximum casualty and poverty reduction in the target provinces, to restore access to archeological sites and ancient temples, and to support rehabilitation and development of the affected communities in the target provinces. 5.12.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Humanitarian Demining in Siem Reap and Oddar Meanchey - Donor(s): The Government of Germany - Project period: January – December 2009 - Teams deployed: 7 Mobile Platoons, 1 CMC team, 2 Brush Cutter teams, 3 EOD teams, 3

Technical Survey team. - Locations of deployment: Oddar Meanchey and Siem Reap provinces - Budget: USD 1,350,523 - Key expected outputs: approx. 3,108,000 m² of landmine contamination area. - Number of staff: 250 personnel.

5.13. CMAC-JAIF: PROJECT FOR THE EXPLOSIVE REMNANTS OF WAR CLEARANCE OPERATIONS IN EASTERN PROVINCES AND MINE CLEARANCE IN NORTH-WESTERN CAMBODIA In 2007, Japan started to allocate a budget of around 7 million USD to support ASEAN countries to deal with landmines and UXO in their respective countries. In 2007, CMAC received a budget of over 300,000 USD from this funding scheme to support its ERW activities in the eastern provinces. In 2008, funding to CMAC under this scheme increased to USD 1,998,973. CMAC utilized this fund to support its ERW activities in the eastern provinces and mine clearance activities in north-western Banteay Meanchey. This project has two separate components: ERW activities in the eastern provinces and mine clearance activities in north-western province of Banteay Meanchey, taking over from the NPA project. The eastern component comprises of one ERO Office, a monitoring team, one supervisor, 5 ERI teams (Explosive Remnants of War Intervention), 4 ERC teams (Explosive Remnants of War Clearance), 10 CBURR, and 4 EDD teams. This component ended in August 2008, except the 4 EDD teams which will conclude under this project at the end of March 2009. The Dutch funding for NPA-DU1(Demining Unit-1) project officially ended in August 2007. In April 2008, JAIF funding started to cover 5 Mobile Platoons and 2 Brush Cutter teams from the old NPA project. This component will end in March 2009. The overall progress of this project to date is:

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- Cleared: 853,205 m² of landmine contaminated area and 2,667,704 m² of UXO contaminated area.

- Found and destroyed: 4,704 AP mines, 78 AT mines and 41,917 UXO. 5.13.1. Project’s Goal The goal of this project is to continue and expand the ERW response capacity in the ERW affected areas in the eastern provinces of Kampong Cham, Kracheh, Stueng Traeng, Rotanak Kiri and to continue the demining capacity in DU1 based in Banteay Meanchey provice in order to bring about personal security to children, families, and communities living in the contaminated areas and to enable safe access to resources and provide safe land to support rehabilitation and development activities within the affected communities. 5.13.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Explosive Remnants of War Clearance Operations in Eastern Provinces and Mine Clearance in North-Western Cambodia

- Donor(s): The Government of Japan through ASEAN Secretariat - Project period: April 2008 – March 2009 - Teams deployed: 5 Mobile Platoons, 2 Brush Cutter teams, 5 ERI teams (Explosive Remnants

of War Intervention), 4 ERC teams (Explosive Remnants of War Clearance), 10 CBURR, 4 EDD teams, one ERO Office, a monitoring team, and one supervisor.

- Locations of deployment: Banteay Meanchey and eastern provinces. - Budget: USD 1,998,973 - Key expected outputs: based on targets of individual teams - Number of staff: 222 personnel.

5.14. US SUPPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE REMNANTS OF WAR CLEARANCE OPERATIONS IN EASTERN PROVINCES OF CAMBODIA In 2003, CMAC started to take up an initiative to seek funding to deploy EOD response capacity in eastern provinces of Cambodia, where the serious problem of ERW remained largely unsolved and an increase in economic, development and resettlement activities expected to lead to a potential increase of risks. In 2006, CMAC received financial support from the Japanese Government to deploy ERC and ERI teams and CBURR in these provinces. The funding scheme was called Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund (JAIF) and was provided through the ASEAN secretariat. Since CMAC's re-deployed its ERW response teams in 2006 in the eastern provinces, CMAC has produced the following outputs (all projects working in eastern provinces):

• Cleared a total of 1,115,039 m² of UXO contaminated area. • Found and destroyed a total of 87,023 UXO, 77 anti-tank mines and 2,186 anti-

personnel mines. • Responded to 8,319 ERW tasks.

The Japan ASEAN Integration Fund (JAIF) project supporting the ERO component officially ended in August 2008. To continue operating the resources already deployed in the eastern provinces, upon the conclusion of the JAIF project CMAC requires a total funding of USD 600,009 annually. It is expected

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that the Embassy of the United States will answer this call to close the funding gap by taking over the funding of Eastern regional office and operation teams. The project is proposed for a 12-month period, starting from January-December 2009. This project also aims to provide a proactive ERW response by conducting sub-surface battle area clearance (BAC) to minimize potential risks associated with ERW as the socio-economic and development activities are anticipated to take place in these parts of the country. 5.14.1. Project’s Goal This project aims to maintain CMAC's presence with an effective ERW response capacity in the eastern part of Cambodia to continue ERW reactive and proactive ERW activities in the areas. The overall goal of this project is to bring about human security to the people, children, families, and communities living in ERW affected areas, respectively in the eastern provinces of Kampong Cham, Kratie, Stueng Traeng and Rotanak Kiri, to enable them go about their livelihood, socio-economic and community development in a safe and confident manner. 5.14.2. Summary Profile of the Project

- Project's title: Explosive Remnants of War Clearance Operations in Eastern Provinces and Mine Clearance in North-Western Cambodia

- Donor(s): The US Government - Project period: expected January – December 2009 - Teams deployed: 1 ERO Office, 4 explosive detection dog (EDD) Teams, 4 ERW clearance

(ERC) Teams, 5 ERW intervention (ERI) Teams, 1 ERI Supervisor, 10 CBURR District Focal Point officers

- Locations of deployment: Eastern Provinces of Kampong Cham, Kracheh, Stung Treng, and Ratanak Kiri

- Key expected outputs: estimated at 2,554,000 m² of UXO contamination area cleared and 25,800 UXO collected and destroyed in total.

- Budget: USD 600,009 - Number of staff: 102 personnel.

5.15. CMAC – ECOSORN PROJECT ECOSORN - Economic and Social Relaunch of Northwest Provinces (Battambang, Banteay Meanchey and Siem Reap) – is a three-year project to be implemented in 2008. This project is supported by the European Commission (EC) and the Royal Government of Cambodia and co-managed by the EC and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry. Following a successful bidding process, CMAC was awarded the demining work and several other smaller works projects. This is a fee-based project with a total budgeted fee of USD 1,172,848. The project has two distinct activities: demining and institutional support. Demining targets clearance of contaminated land to support other ECOSORN's rural development activities, whereas the institutional support is designed to strengthen the CBMRR as well as the local communities and authorities to deal with landmine/UXO problem and rural development planning.

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2009 will be the second year of implementing this project. The following gives a summary of the progress in the past year:

- Cleared: 927,810 m² of landmine contaminated area. - Found and destroyed: 567 AP mines, 6 AT mines and 1,251 UXO. - 7 DFP were recruited, 14 DFP trained. - 276 MUC members were recruited, 46 MUC members at the district, commune and

village level were trained under the existing UNICEF-CMAC program. 5.15.1. Project's Purpose Safer permanent access to arable land and social infrastructure through implementation of mine risk reduction strategies and limited de-mining, with relative activities 5.15.2. Project's Summary Profile:

- Project's title: CMAC – ECOSORN - Donor(s): EC - Project period: November 2007 – September 2010 - Teams deployed: 3 Key Experts, 3 Rapid Manual Clearance Response team (CMC), 1 Mine

Detection Dog Intervention team (MDD), 1 Mechanical Intervention team (BC), 1 Rapid EOD Response team (EOD), 1 Minefield Technical Survey team (TS), 18 CBMRR, and 1 Institutional Support team (IS).

- Locations of deployment: Banteay Meanchey, Battambang, Siem Reap. - Budget: USD 1,172,848 for three years (annual budget of around USD 400,000). - Key expected outputs: 400 ha of land cleared, approximately 400 people trained at commune

council level. - Number of staff: 95 personnel.

5.16. OTHER PROJECTS 5.16.1. CMAC - UNICEF Project to Support Mine/UXO Risk Education In 2009, UNICEF will continue to support CMAC with a budget of USD 109,805 for 12 months from January to December to deliver mine/UXO risk education to people at risk. This is another phase of on-going assistance by UNICEF to CMAC to support mine/UXO awareness and risk reduction activities aimed to deliver risk education messages and carry out risk reduction activities in high casualty areas. This assistance is in collaboration with other partners such as UNDP, the US State Department, ECOSORN, and JMAS. The projects supports CBMRR, Mine/UXO Risk Education and Reduction (MRE) teams and mass media campaign through TV, radio, billboards and other mine/UXO risk education materials. It is worth mentioning that the casualty rate in Cambodia has significantly dropped in the past 3 years from 800 to 1,000 casualties per year in the past to over 200 in 2008. This is in part due to the active mine/UXO risk education campaigns and the large scale clearance effort achieved by all operators. 5.16.2. PEACEBOAT Project to Support Demining and School Construction

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Peaceboat, through their active fund-raising activities, has been providing fund to CMAC to support landmine clearance and school construction since 2001. Their yearly contribution has made a significant impact on the communities through the landmine clearance and construction of schools so children can enjoy safe access to this basic educational facility. This improves children's lives and will have far reaching impacts on their future. CMAC has a strong commitment to continue to work with Peaceboat to change the children's lives. In 2009, Peaceboat is expected to provide around USD 40,000 to USD 100,000 to support mine clearance and school construction in a target province. 5.16.3. CMAC - MAG MDD CMAC has not only established and sustained an effective domestic MDD program, but also extended this service to MAG to support MAG’s demining operations in Cambodia. CMAC started to supply MDD to MAG in 2005, and this cooperation program will continue in 2009 with 3 short leash MDD teams to support MAG’s demining activities in Battambang and Preah Vihear. 5.16.4. CMAC - GTC (MDD) BOSNIA: Provision of MDD and Technical Assistance Since the conclusion of the Swedish funding and technical assistance, CMAC has faced financial constraints to supply new dogs for its MDD program to meet the expansion and replacement requirements. With a very strong commitment to continue the program, because of the MDD success in field operations, CMAC entered into agreement with GTC Bosnia to supply approximately 10 dogs per year to CMAC free of charge. Since 2006, NPA's Global Training Centre (GTC) in Bosnia has been providing semi-trained mine detection dogs and technical assistance to CMAC to support CMAC's MDD training program. This support has been valuable in continuing CMAC's MDD operations to make contributions to landmine clearance. In 2006, CMAC trained 4 of the dogs from GTC to become UXO/explosive detection dogs (EDD) and they all became field operational in 2007. GTC Bosnia has already provided 10 dogs for the fiscal year 2008, and these dos are now being trained at CMAC's Training Centre. In addition, to support CMAC's MDD breeding program and to compensate for the loss of 7 puppies born in Cambodia, GTC also delivered 10 puppies to CMAC to be trained as mine detection dogs. Similar support is also expected for the coming year of 2009. Summary of dog delivery by GTC Bosnia to CMAC:

No Year of Delivery Number of Dogs Delivered Remarks 1 2006 9 2 2007 20 3 2008 21 10 puppies Total: 50

5.16.5. CMAC – GEJ Project to Support Post Clearance Development In early 2007, Hitachi Corporation, using its corporate social responsibility fund, established a non-profit organization (NPO) called Good Earth Japan. The purpose was to cooperate with CMAC to provide community development support in mine affected areas cleared by CMAC. GEJ has been

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operational since and has been active in Battambang. This project focuses on rural roads, water and agriculture development. 5.16.6. Community Integrated Development Project Similar to GEJ, Komatsu Ltd. has also established a non-profit project to support mine clearance and post-clearance development in Cambodia. The Community Integrated Development project has been implemented by JMAS in partnership with CMAC and financially supported by Komatsu Ltd since July 2008. This project employs one Mobile Platoon and 1 Demining Machine (Komatsu). The annual budget of this project is approximately USD 220,000. This projects delivers two key activities: demining and community development including construction of rural roads, water resources, digging wells, etc. In addition to lending one demining machine, Komatsu Ltd. also provides some road construction machinery to support this project. 5.16.7. CMAC - BHP Billiton: Project to Support Mineral Exploration in Mondul Kiri Large scale engagement with BHP Billiton in the bauxite exploration project in Mondul Kiri marked a new stage for CMAC demonstrating its capacity to deliver contractual services to development partners. In this engagement starting from 2007, CMAC provides the ERW clearance (including deep search and borehole), UXO risk education, community liaison as well as drilling services (expanded lately) to support BHP Billiton conducting bauxite exploration activities in the province. Though this is a first large scale contractual service of its nature, CMAC has gained substantial experience and built up solid capacity to deliver a service of this sort. Through this engagement, CMAC has also received substantial training, equipment support as well as new technology to carry out deep search in the target province. According to the Company's schedule, this project will conclude in March 2009. 5.16.8. CMAC – PGS: Project to Support Mineral Exploration Around Tonle Sap Basin PGS has announced a plan to survey approximately 1,400 km² in Tonle Sap and Kompong Som basins, onshore the Kingdom of Cambodia, in conjunction with the Cambodian National Petroleum Authority (CNPA). With such a large scale operations, mine and UXO clearance is part of the essential tasks to be safely and professionally undertaken. In this framework, PGS started to engage CMAC in February 2008, starting with one TSC team and expanding to 1 TSC and 1 EOD team from June 2008. With exploration activities intensifying, it is expected that activities with PGS will also increase in term of service delivery. It is hopeful that partnership with PGS will continue, and likely increase, in 2009 and beyond. 5.16.9. CMAC – HIB: Project to Support Mineral Exploration Around Tonle Sap Basin CMAC and HIB have been working together to promote a new project to proactively address the ERW problem in the eastern provinces. This initiative of pro-activity will also respond to the National ERW Strategy 2007-2015.

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CMAC and HIB plan to work together to respond to ERW contamination in the Eastern Provinces. The action will strengthen existing EOD and BAC capacity and will also see the deployment of additional mobile ERW teams and community-based ERW clearance teams. The objective is to answer the calls within 24 hours. 5.16.10. CMAC – JICA Technical Cooperation Starting from April 2008, JICA has been supporting CMAC with three new technical advisors for training, information management systems and central workshop in addition to the existing corporate management advisory assistance. The main purpose of this technical cooperation assistance project is to strengthen the function of CMAC's demining activities so that its know-how can be transferred to other demining organizations. This project will continue till June 2010. 5.16.11. New Zealand Support to the Training Centre Staring from 2008, the Government of New Zealand also dispatched a Technical Advisor to CMAC's Training Centre to develop this Training Centre into the Centre of Excellence. This Technical Advisor assists the Training Centre to improve technical training curricula, training material, training needs assessment, course design and delivery of training course. 5.16.12. AYAD/VIDA Program AusAid will provide 2 skilled volunteers to CMAC in 2009, one from the AYAD program (Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development) for 12 months, and one from the VIDA program (Volunteering for International Development from Australia ) for 18 months. Volunteers will assist through capacity building and skills transfer in areas including Project Management and Reporting, and Fundraising and Communication. 5.16.13. Japanese Grant Aid Phase V In 2009, CMAC expects to receive the fifth phase of Grant Aid provided by the Japanese Government supporting CMAC in term of equipment. A Minutes of Discuss has been signed between CMAC and JICA's Representative and an Exchange of Note is expected to be signed between the two governments following approval by the Japanese Government of the proposed project. This project aims to support CMAC with mine and UXO detectors, other demining-related equipment and spare parts for demining equipment. 5.16.14. CMAC - R&D Projects

1. Explosive Harvesting Program: CMAC has been implementing this research and development program with Golden West supported by the US Government since 2005. This program operates to extract explosives from projectiles and large mines and shape the explosives into charges for field use by demining operators to supplement or replace explosives imported from overseas. The other objective of the program is to train CMAC's counterparts to manage and run the program in the future when this program is fully operational. Golden West, currently in charge of the program's operations, have been

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training dozens of CMAC's EOD staff on a rotational basis ensuring every EOD operator has a chance to work with the program for a period of time to further build up their EOD skills and capacity. This project has great significance but mostly: it trains CMAC's EOD staff in the explosive harvesting techniques, provides explosive harvesting facilities and produces shaped-charges for use by demining operators such as CMAC, Halo Trust and MAG to replace the imported explosives, which are both expensive and difficult to obtain.

2. HSTAMIDS Training: HSTAMIDS is an American made dual sensor landmine detector

that would first detect metallic object using metal detector in its head and then analysis the suspected metallic object by using its sensor. The test was joint conducted between CMAC and American counterpart in Siem Reap (performance and SOP training at newly constructed test lanes within DU 4 compound) and Battambang. It started from June 2008 and will continue into 2009. CMAC is still collecting more data, conducting analysis of these data to evaluate the performance of this detector, and developing appropriate SOP's to utilize the detector in field operations. However, it is highly expected that it would contribute greatly to speed up the landmine clearance operation in Cambodia.

3. ALIS Test: ALIS (Advanced Landmine Imaging System) was tested in Cambodia in 2007 under the Project for Research and Development of Mine Clearance Related Equipment Phase I supported by the Government of Japan. The system did not prove to be field practical, and it was recommended for further improvement. With improvements made to the system, CMAC plans to conduct re-evaluation of the detector in Cambodia again in 2009 to assess the performance and quality of this detector.

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6. CORPORATE MANAGEMENT 6.1. KEY DETERMINANTS FOR THE MANAGEMENT WORK PLAN CMAC foresees 2009 as a challenging year, both in strategic and operational terms. Firstly, 2009 will be a year of transition for Cambodia, marking the end of the ten-year mandate under the Ottawa Mine Ban Treaty. Cambodia is requesting from the international community ten more years to attempt to meet the obligations stipulated under Article 5 of the Treaty. To achieve this, Cambodia is actively involving all key stakeholders and operators to prepare an extension request, which will require the Government to prepare a new national strategy for mine action in parallel. According to the Mine Ban Treaty's procedures, Cambodia is required to submit the Request to the 9th MSP meeting by March 2009 for formal consideration by the MSP by the end of the year. However, preparing this Extension Request does not come without challenges. One of the key challenges is to quantify the remaining problem to be addressed and the resources required in the next ten years. Cambodia will embark on a new baseline survey to obtain more reliable information on the problem to be addressed. International advocacy against cluster munitions has increased in the last few years with the establishment of the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM). The CCM convention was adopted in Dublin by 107 states on 30 May 2008. 94 of those states have signed the Convention during the Signing Conference in Oslo on 3 – 4 December 2008. CMAC has a full capacity and long experience in combating ERW and cluster munitions, and this will be intensified in the coming years to seek and channel more resources to this purpose. CMAC has also aligned its strategy and training of its deminers in multi-skills related to ERW in the past few years in preparedness to address this grave problem. The Kingdom of Cambodia has always been strongly committed to addressing the landmine and ERW problem. The new Government also demonstrates its continued commitment by actively supporting the mine action sector, strengthening its policy and institutional framework and making the utmost effort to meeting international obligations. This continued commitment provides a policy framework for the national authority, operators and key players to define their strategy and plans of actions in line with the overall national vision of zero victims and poverty reduction. In response to this policy framework, CMAC has anticipated the needs to strengthen its organizational capacity to meet the changing mine action environments, nationally and internationally. To this end, CMAC has successfully implemented a five-year strategic plan and conducted a series of organizational and operational reforms significantly improving the productivity, cost efficiency and effectiveness. As a result of these efforts, CMAC has doubled its operational outputs while maintaining the same level of operational costs. For the path ahead, CMAC is adopting a new rolling five-year strategic plan 2009-2013 which embraces an ambitious vision to support the national mine action strategy. As 2009 is the first year to implement this five-year strategic plan, inline with the new national mine action strategy, there will be several issues relevant to the national strategy as well as specific to CMAC.

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6.2. MANAGEMENT PLAN 6.2.1. Management Goal To lead CMAC in delivering its mine action service in a sound and professional manner in adherence with CMAC's core values. 6.2.2. Management Objectives and Activities CMAC management aims to achieve the following objectives and activities:

6.2.2.1. To develop medium and long term strategies for CMAC and develop work plans to

achieve those strategies. Activities: 1. To finalize the Five-Year Strategic Plan by the end of first quarter. 2. To conduct consultation workshops to present and solicit inputs to the Plan. 3. To seek approval of the Plan from the Governing Council. 4. To communicate and circulate the Plan document to staff.

6.2.2.2. To constantly monitor and evaluate the organizational performance against the work plans and timely review and adjust adopted strategies or develop new strategies to meet the changing needs. Activities: 1. To commission internal and external QA to carry out the monitoring and

evaluation of performance. 2. To utilize the QA findings to adjust the strategies or adopt new strategies to

improve the performance. 6.2.2.3. To review and reform the organizational structures at all levels when and where

necessary to meet the needs of operational requirements and mine action changes. Activities: 1. To review operational structure requirements and propose appropriate

adjustments. 2. To seek approval from the Governing Council on the changes to the structures. 3. To provide appropriate training to implement the new structure, if necessary.

6.2.2.4. To continually to improve internal management and control through sound internal policies, procedures and standard operations procedures (SOP's). Activities: 1. To review existing and develop new policies, procedures and SOP's to reflect the

changes of strategies, structures and work practices. 2. To provide training to relevant staff on the new policies, procedures and SOP's. 3. To monitor the implementation of the new/revised policies, procedures and SOP's.

6.2.2.5. To continue to strengthen the culture of responsibility and accountability at all levels. This exercise can be strengthened through empowering, training, delegation and decentralization of decision making. Activities: 1. To communicate the preferred culture to staff at all levels to enhance their

understanding and internalization. 2. To provide on-going training and coaching to enforce the culture.

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3. To reinforce internal rules and regulations and take appropriate motivation and disciplinary actions.

4. To empower management at all levels to make decision and take responsibility and accountability for their decisions.

6.2.2.6. To promote staff motivation through improved staff welfare, multi-skills, and skill-based job placement. Activities: 1. To provide decent compensations, healthcare, and retirement package for staff. 2. To seek social welfare from the Ministry of Labour. 3. To seek the Government's endorsement to include CMAC staff as civil servants. 4. To assess skills and requirements and provide appropriate training to staff. 5. To ensure a sound personnel management in job placement matching their skills.

6.2.2.7. To improve coordination and collaboration with stakeholders, including donors, development partners, national and international agencies, national and local authorities and grassroot communities to enhance exchange of information, planning and quality of service delivery. Activities: 1. To provide timely and regular progress reports to donors and partners. 2. To hold and participate in meetings and workshops to disseminate and receive

appropriate information. 3. To arrange appropriate field visits to provide better understanding of the field

operations. 6.2.3. Key Indicators

1. Medium and long term strategies finalized and approved by end of first quarter. 2. Proper work plans established for internal and external QA. 3. Actions taken based on QA findings. 4. Structures reviewed and approved by mid year. 5. New/revised structures implemented effectively. 6. A number of SOP's, policies and procedures reviewed, amended/developed, approved,

trained and implemented effectively. 7. More and effective decisions made at middle and front line management. 8. Rules and regulations observed and adhered to. 9. Compensations, healthcare and retirement reviewed. 10. Right jobs for right skills. 11. 600 to 700 personnel trained in new skills. 12. A number of senior, middle and front line managers trained. 13. At least two stakeholder field visits organized annually. 14. Reports delivered on time.

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7. RISK AND CONTINGENCY MANAGEMENT This Integrated work plan has been produced to represent CMAC activities expected to take place in the 2009 implementing year. These activities are planned to lead to achievement of the expected outputs in term of landmine and ERW clearance, outputs which are larger than any yearly target previously. This can only occur when contributing environmental and funding factors are favorable. All planned activities, projected outputs and expected inputs are based upon both fact and best assumptions at the time. Assumptions such as clearance productivities are projected based on current and historical information available on the level of funding to be received and the capability of the various CMAC teams/tools. Funding to support operations was projected based upon the contractual amount of current and future projects and in some case the expected future projects; an assumption necessary to allow operations to proceed. CMAC relies very heavily on external funding to sustain its demining operations. In past years, it has not been uncommon for CMAC to face difficult financial challenges. During these difficult times, effective, often tough, measures must be introduced and implemented in order to avoid or minimize disruptions to operations. Risk management and contingency planning are necessary activities in demining and contingencies often need to be implemented in unpredictable situations. As with any plan, there may be implementation problems caused by internal or external elements which need to be overcome. Some examples of these are: projects being dropped, delayed, revised or cut short due to reduced or unavailable funding. Also plans can be interrupted by unforeseeable environmental forces or man made catastrophe such as acts of war. It is important to identify potential risks that may arise in planning so solutions can be identified and implemented if necessary. Listed below are some of the potential risks associated with this IWP: 1. Heavy dependence on donors: CMAC is heavily dependent on donor support which poses one of

the major risks for its activities. Approximately 95% of CMAC's activities and resources are supported by several different donors, development partners and contracting clients. Technically, each of these financing sources has its own focus, which sometimes has a critical impact on CMAC. Through CMAC's practical experience, we believe that good communications and well fostered relationship among donors, key stakeholders and CMAC is critical and must be cherished. CMAC will strive to maintain and further improve these relationships. Accordingly, coordination among all key players is another highly important factor to ensure the IWP is well accepted, and donors, clients and relevant stakeholders concerns are immediately addressed as they emerged. However, should funding be adversely affected because of projects being dropped, delayed, revised or cut short due to reduced or unavailable funding, CMAC will exercise its contingency mechanism appropriately to lessen adverse impacts.

2. Demining is dangerous by its nature. It is generally accepted that demining work is a dangerous

tasks, deminers require a high level of concentration and must strictly follow the standard operations procedures (SOPs) as a safety guideline and maintenance of work standards.

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This IWP highlights CMAC efforts to achieve higher clearance output for nearly the same amount of funding resource. This stretching of output could be viewed as a cause of concern; however, CMAC projected its capability with in a careful and calculated manner, according to the prevailing ground situation, experience, research, technology and methodology available, and being conscious of staff safety and well being. Together with keeping the level of morale and disciplines high, CMAC will ensure that the work practices continue in the safest environment for all staff, demining tools and equipment are appropriately allocated, maintained and supported; this will ensure that targeted outputs are reached.

3. Political Commitment: The Royal Government of Cambodia makes every effort and commitment

to support mine action in Cambodia. The Royal Government of Cambodia has incorporated mine action into its rectangular strategy and millennium development goals. Unfortunately, the current economic situation and revenue collection is limited which puts constraints on its ability to increase financial support to CMAC. Nonetheless, the Royal Government has committed significant financial resources to mine action sector in Cambodia through various channels and has created conducive environment and legislation to ensure that mine action business occurs as smoothly and as professionally as possible. CMAC will continue to work very close with the Royal Government’s different ministries and national authorities as well as local authorities to sustain this commitment and relationship. The recent appointment of CMAC Director General as Advisor to the Prime Minister is a step in the right direction demonstrating the commitment and relationship the Royal Government has with CMAC.

4. Environmental Factors: This can be one of the biggest impacts on demining activities.

Experience shows that environmental factors, including terrain, weather conditions and density of vegetation can slow down demining work considerably. Appropriate solutions must be found to address these issues at the field level. To address this, new approaches to mine/ERW clearance and technology will be introduced, demining teams will be retrained and refreshed, multi-skills training will be provided, thus allowing field personnel to appropriately response to prevailing environment.

CMAC is committed to finding the best possible solutions to deal with any problems that emerge during implementation of this IWP. Less serious impacts can often be dealt with through improving communication and coordination and training and mobilizing appropriate resources and methods to address problems. More serious impacts caused by financial shortfalls or lack of political wills can result in more drastic contingencies which CMAC will take into consideration to respond to each crisis as best as possible when they occur.

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Annex C to SOP 810

SOCIO ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT OF MINE CLEARANCE OPERATIONS - PROVISIONAL GUIDELINES ANNEXE II/1Demining Operator: CMACREVIEW OF OPERATOR MINE CLEARANCE WORK PLAN 2009 - Version 00Updated: 21-Jan-09

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 171 1 M 07835 87MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Malay Thmey 1090408 5436-2 218033 1498675 Road 502 39,9722 2 M 12200 88MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay O Saralao Thmey 1090308 5436-2 222566 1498913 Road 502 27,4383 3 M 11668 45MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Khla Ngoab 01090103 5536-3 232271 1498791 Road502 118,232 L1S-013494 4 M 08140 49MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 235849 1501246 Thbaung Phum-2 88,208 L1S-014015 5 M 07950 50MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 236690 1501514 Thbaung Phum-3 128,370 L1S-014016 6 M 07967 90MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 236368 1501409 Thbaung Phum 5 156,426 L1S-014017 7 M 07874 55MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 235026 1500734 Srah Roka 114,665 L1S-014018 8 M 02378 91MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 235015 1500071 Next to road 172,060 L1S-014019 9 M 12237 48MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 236296 1501589 Thbaung Phum-1 96,969 L1S-01401

10 10 M 12236 51MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Banteay Ti Muoy 01090104 5536-3 236768 1501244 Thbaung Phum-4 81,991 L1S-0140111 11 M 11645 60MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro O Ampil 01090506 5536-3 238353 1497812 Prasat Chas-2 101,612 L1S-0140912 12 M 08010-C 104MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro O Ampil 1090107 5536-4 238356 1498013 Prasat Chas(C) 42,33213 13 M 09750 99MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Sante Pheap 1090107 5536-3 239579 1504513 Srah Yuon (A) 47,90814 14 M 07041-A 106MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Sante Pheap 1090107 5536-3 240160 1504545 Srah Yuon (C) 51,84015 15 M 07030-B 105MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro Sante Pheap 1090107 5536-3 238949 1504000 Sante Pheap(05-AWest)) 143,40916 16 M 09755 98MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Takong Balaink 1090602 5535-4 248956 1488848 Tumnub Neary 50,87117 17 M 09754 100MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Takong Balaink 1090602 5535-4 247307 1488469 Tumnub Neary(A) 49,71018 18 M 09753 101MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Takong Balaink 1090602 5535-4 245651 1488090 Tumnub Neary(B) 59,38519 19 M 08222-B 103MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Takong Balaink 1090602 5535-4 251240 1489794 Tumnub Neary(west) 71,61020 20 M 09756 102MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Takong Takong 1090602 5535-4 254781 1491636 Tumnub Neary(C) 25,96221 21 M 12199 17OV2014 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Chok Chey 01050902 5536-3 247157 1518996 Thbaung Tumnub K5-2 89,237 L1S-0125722 22 M 09737 18OV2015 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Thnal Bat 01050909 5536-1 259073 1522634 Rong MasIn Chas-1 50,35423 23 M 09738 19OV2016 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Thnal Bat 01050909 5536-1 259364 1522817 Rong MasIn Chas-2 50,01424 24 M 09739 20OV2017 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Thnal Bat 01050909 5536-1 259648 1523014 Rong MasIn Chas-3 50,02325 25 M 12198 21OV2017 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Prasat 01050904 5536-2 256392 1521019 Lech Tumnub Yeang 84,47026 26 M 12201 22OV2017 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Prasat 01050904 5536-2 256990 1520916 Lech Tumnub Preav 85,58227 27 M 11646 23OV2017 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Prey Chan 01050906 5536-1 256717 1528550 Choeng Vat Rieb Thmey-1 81,61728 28 M 11647 24OV2017 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Prey Chan 01050906 5536-1 256694 1528703 Choeng Vat Rieb Thmey-2 39,43129 29 M 11648 25OV2018 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Yeang Dang kum 01050911 5536-1 256752 1521841 Anlong Koki 56,75330 30 M 02818 27OCV2009 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov Kot Tasorth Yeay Ort 1050304 5536-3 257612 1495430 Down bridge 23,54931 31 M 09744-B 28OCV2009 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov Nimith Thmor Sen 1050410 5536-2 258002 1509740 Tum nubta Dara(A) 26,73132 32 M 10600-B 29OCV2009 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov Sophy So Phy Choeng 1050601 5636-2 257480 1518748 O Yeang 70,31933 33 M 10601 30OCV2009 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov Sophy So Phy Choeng 1050601 5636-2 259422 1515133 O Yeang 83,84734 34 M 12232 05SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Samrong 1080411 5536-1 272904 1535869 Tuol Treas-1 76,843 L1S-0118035 35 M 11413 06SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Samrong 1080411 5536-1 272650 1535892 Tuol Treas-2 76,489 L1S-0118036 36 M 11412 07SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Samrong 1080411 5536-1 272403 1535915 Tuol Treas-3 76,705 L1S-01180

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

37 37 M 11178 10SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 267392 1532728 Lboek Ampil Choeng Phlov-1 75,117 L1S-0117538 38 M 11179 11SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 267588 1532706 Lboek Ampil Choeng Phlov-2 87,518 L1S-0117539 39 M 00083 13SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 269530 1533069 Khmoch A Chea 61,486 L1S-0117540 40 M 11396 16SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 269080 1531478 Ta some-5 50,367 L1S-0117541 41 M 09153 24SVC2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Damnak Kakoh 1080413 5536-1 260664 1531410 Khang Tbaung Phum (G) 63,40642 42 M 09154 23SVC2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Damnak Kakoh 1080413 5536-1 260930 1531658 Khang Tbaung Phum (F) 55,91143 43 M 09150-B 65SVC2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Lboek Svay 1080414 5536-1 263435 1533075 Khang Choeung Phum (B) 20,53244 44 M 11400 18SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 01080703 5536-1 273334 1538544 Long Ang Krong-1 100,154 L1S-0116245 45 M 11399 19SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 01080703 5536-1 273620 1538459 Long Ang Krong-2 102,255 L1S-0116246 46 M 09758 41SVC2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 1080703 5536-1 276213 1537247 Thminh Trey (A) 100,02047 47 M 09528 43SCV2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 1080703 5536-1 276032 1537254 Thminh Trey (C) 49,99348 48 M 09529 41SCV2007 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 1080703 5536-1 275950 1537158 Thminh Trey (D) 49,90549 49 M 09530 42SCV2007 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 1080703 5536-1 275882 1537819 Thminh Trey (E) 50,80250 50 M 08416-B 64SCV2007 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 01080703 5536-1 275487 1535990 Kranan Som 85,96351 51 M 10510 64SVC2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 1080703 5536-1 275060 1535800 Chhlaunh Ty Muoy 190,71652 52 M 09525 49SCV2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Ponley Thmey 1080701 5536-1 276211 1537386 Kanh Choan Krauch-A 50,40353 53 M 09526 50SCV2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Ponley Thmey 1080701 5536-1 276467 1537592 Kanh Choan Krauch-B 50,90254 54 M 09527 51SCV2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Ponley Thmey 1080701 5536-1 275462 1537781 Kanh Choan Krauch-C 50,40355 55 M 11398 22SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Phkoam Takol 01080111 5636-4 299449 1527366 Thnal Prolean 50,000 L1S-0115656 56 M 11643 32TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Prasat Tbeng 01070109 5537-2 276916 1562570 Tuol Vat Chas 83,487 L1S-0126857 57 M 11642 33TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Prasat Tbeng 01070109 5537-1 277474 1563152 Behind School 186,482 L1S-0126858 58 M 11666 45TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 296380 1555822 Prasat Mebon 3 101,060 L1S-0130259 59 M 11665 46TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 296620 1555827 Prasat Mebon 5 95,180 L1S-0130260 60 M 11664 47TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 296740 1555829 Prasat Mebon 6 95,328 L1S-0130261 61 M 11663 48TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 296860 1555831 Prasat Mebon 7 95,476 L1S-0130262 62 M 11662 49TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 296980 1555834 Prasat Mebon 8 95,660 L1S-0130263 63 M 11661 50TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 297100 1555836 Prasat Mebon 9 95,836 L1S-0130264 64 M 11658 54TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5637-3 298038 1555848 Prasat Mebon 13 101,769 L1S-0130265 65 M 09041-B 75TPK2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 1070103 5637-3 295720 1555665 Castle 49,25866 66 M 12235 55TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Kuok Romiet Boeng Sokram 1070222 5536-1 269957 1544781 Trapang Sokram 87,37267 67 M 09991 41TPK2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Kuok Romiet Vor Preng 1070212 5536-1 271346 1546375 Boeng Vor Preng 24,98768 68 M 10787 01SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Slor Kram Toap Siem 01080304 5536-II 276015 1517838 Sre Santey Ti 3 14,68269 69 M 10785 02SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Slor Kram Toap Siem 01080304 5536-II 276117 1518005 Sre Santey Ti 1 15,16570 70 M 10786 03SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Slor Kram Toap Siem 01080304 5536-II 275198 1517835 Sre Santey Ti 2 17,37971 71 M 02555 48SVC2009 Banteay Mean Chey Svay Chek Svay Chek Punsay Choeung 1080402 5536-II 275000 1527600 Stoeung Cheng 1 66,284 Yes72 72 M 02556 49SVC2009 Banteay Mean Chey Svay Chek Svay Chek Punsay Choeung 1080402 5536-II 275300 1527400 Stoeung Cheng 2 7,500 Yes73 73 M 00093 50SVC2009 Banteay Mean Chey Svay Chek Svay Chek Punsay Choeung 1080402 5536-II 276400 1524800 Stoeung Cheng 3 91,803 Yes74 74 M 01736 51SVC2009 Banteay Mean Chey Svay Chek Svay Chek Thmei 2 1080409 5536-I 273808 1530865 Kork Trach 2 11,430 Yes75 75 M 10835-A 47SVC2009 Banteay Mean Chey Svay Chek Treas Doun Nouy 1080703 5536-1 275052 1538200 Traping Trey Chhlonh 100,500 Yes76 76 M 10837 52SVC2008 Banteay Mean Chey Svay Chek Phkoam Ampil 1080104 5636-IV 299057 1525948 Prey Ar Kros 14,327 Yes77 77 U 12284 65TPK2009 Banteay Mean Chey Thma Puok Kumru Kumru 1070602 5636-4 289237 1541257 Khang Lech Choeung Toek S 16,983 Yes

DU#1 - Total Plan 5,504,73578 1 M 07871-A 107MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro O Ampil 1090107 5536-4 239825 1498769 Prasat Chas 60,70079 2 M 07871-B 108MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro O Ampil 1090107 5536-4 239604 1498705 Prasat Chas 51,68080 3 M 07871-C 109MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro O Ampil 1090107 5536-4 239383 1498642 Prasat Chas 51,65381 4 M 07871-D 110MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Tuol Pong Ro O Ampil 1090107 5536-4 239811 1498821 Prasat Chas 51,75082 5 M 04633-B 111MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay O Sampor Banteay Ti Pi 1090204 5436-2 228956 1498974 Road 502 38,545

77 MFs are planned

Page 2 of 36

Page 96:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

83 6 M 04633-C 112MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay O Sampor Banteay Ti Pi 1090204 5436-2 228654 1498978 Road 502 41,68184 7 M 04633-D 113MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay O Sampor Banteay Ti Pi 1090204 5436-2 22846 1498977 Road 502 39,92385 8 M 04437 89MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay O Sampor Kbal Tumnub 1090203 5436-2 226560 1499225 O Tasek 162,21886 9 M 10283 86MAL2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Malay Malay Thmey 1090408 5436-2 217027 1497715 Phnom Toeuk Chenh 34,55687 10 M 09747 16OV2013 Banteay Mean Cheay O Chrov O Bei Choan Chok Chey 01050902 5536-3 247127 1518809 Thbaung Tumnub K5-1 20,646 L1S-0125788 11 M 11411 08SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Samrong 01080411 5536-1 272154 1535936 Tuol Treas-4 76,937 L1S-0118089 12 M 11475 09SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Samrong 01080411 5536-1 273425 1535345 Tuol Treas-5 72,157 L1S-0118090 13 M 11180 12SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 267786 1532684 Lboek Ampil Choeng Phlov-3 84,286 L1S-0117591 14 M 11395 14SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 269343 1531260 Ta soem-3 49,338 L1S-0117592 15 M 11397 15SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Svay Chek Khvav Lech 01080410 5536-1 269192 1531343 Ta soem-4 50,690 L1S-0117593 16 M 11401 20SVC2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Svay Chek Treas Daun Nauy 01080703 5536-1 273899 1538374 Long Ang Krong-3 101,430 L1S-0116294 17 M 11660 51TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5567-3 297220 1555838 Prasat Mebon 10 91,129 L1S-0130295 18 M 11659 52TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5567-3 297400 1555840 Prasat Mebon 11 93,767 L1S-0130296 19 M 11644 53TPK2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Puok Banteay Chhmar Banteay Chhmar Choeubg 01070103 5567-3 297580 1555842 Prasat Mebon 12 95,154 L1S-0130297 20 M 09760 44TPK2008 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Pouk Banteay Chhmar Prasat Tbeng 1070115 5537-2 277860 1563723 Choab Srah Tamaing (B) 50,07498 21 M 08121 53TPK2007 Banteay Mean Cheay Thmor Pouk Kouk Romiet Beong Ta srey 1070220 5537-2 274437 1555381 Beong Ta Srey 56,52499 22 M 10836 01PNP2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Preah Net Praeh Tean Kam Tean Kam Choeng 01040704 5636-3 304196 1517057 22,682

100 23 M 10840 02PNP2009 Banteay Mean Cheay Preah Net Praeh Tean Kam Tean Kam Choeng 01040704 5636-3 305501 1517100 East Russei Srok 25,668DU#1 -Total Spare 1,423,188

101 1 M 9344 06BAN09 BTB Banan Kantoeu Muoy Svay Prey 2010103 302300 1420894 74,811102 2 M 12707 02BAN09 BTB Banan Kantoeu Muoy Thmey 2010101 299195 1421761 114,888103 3 M 01239 04BAN09 BTB Banan Kantoeu Muoy Thmey 2010101 299175 1421714 89,212104 4 M 12698 37BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Trapeang KbalSva 2040612 5535-2 261560 1443605 35,523105 5 M 04812 36BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Trapeang KbalSva 2040615 5535-2 261585 1442848 16,674106 6 M 12699 44BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Trapeang KbalSva 2040615 5535-4 253787 1443495 133,326107 7 M 12697 41BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Chrang Bak 2040620 5535-2 262227 1451095 33,960108 8 M 08270 38BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Chrang Bak 2040617 5535-2 262372 1452374 206,085109 9 M 12688 07BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Boeng Anlok 2040616 5535-2 266857 1453671 111,531110 10 M 12705 10BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Boeng Anlok 2040616 5535-2 267451 1453249 237,137111 11 M 12700 32BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Braop-haep 2040629 5535-2 265147 1447601 105,219112 12 M 07641 25BAV09 BTB Bavael Kdo Tahaen Anlong Raing 2040621 260548 1451034 7,090113 13 M 09313 10BAV2008 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Khleang 5535-2 262543 1453312 30,927114 14 M 09312 11BAV2008 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Khleang 5535-2 262462 1453429 30,796115 15 M 08258 87KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Samaky 234682 1459195 80,283116 16 M 08262 88KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Samaky 234949 1459443 24,101117 17 M 08468 35KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Samaky 233001 1457658 158,763118 18 M 08466 36KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Samaky 234149 1457401 12,862119 19 M 08261 37KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Samaky 233581 1456987 3,298120 20 M 11435 38KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou Chamlang 2120502 222012 1454449 14,618121 21 M 05729 39KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou Chamlang 2120502 222149 1454862 59,500122 22 M 05710 57KAM2007 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou Chamlang 2120502 5435-2 220911 1455494 21,099123 23 M 05723-B 75KAM2007 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou Chamlang 2120502 5435-2 222063 1456500 152,012124 24 M 07698 50KAM2007 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Dei Kraham 5435-2 222912 1456657 49,300125 25 M 09588-C 08KAM2008 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Dei Kraham 221852 1456508 25,009126 26 M 09588-D 08KAM2008 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Dei Kraham 222044 1456542 9,723

23 MFs are to spare

Page 3 of 36

Page 97:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

127 27 M 12356 79KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Takrey Kamprang 2120603 245578 1451990 118,770128 28 M 12358 80KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Takrey Kamprang 2120603 245592 1452138 118,770129 29 M 09873 83KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Takrey Tuol Til 2120604 247627 1451003 82,100130 30 M 9872 84KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Takrey Tuol Til 2120604 248694 1450526 36,400131 31 M 07168 17Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Preah Phos Boeng Preah 2130402 313352 1409018 44,891132 32 M 10753 02Kkkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Chhnal Moan Krangsvat 2130602 304877 1404693 71,572133 33 M 09362 06KKL2008 BTB Koh Kralor Chhnal Moan Bon Teay Char 5634-4 307579 1406598 30,438134 34 M 12274 35KKL09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey Tathok 2130106 5634-4 310000 1422626 5,500135 35 M 12278 36KKL09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey Tathok 2130106 5534-4 305635 1420775 1,230,100136 36 M 10763 44KKL2008 BTB Koh Kralor Doun Ba Prey Paen 5634-III 307987 1409542 46,179137 37 M 08965 45KKL2008 BTB Koh Kralor Doun Ba Kouk Ror Ka 5634-III 308210 1411636 37,500138 38 M 10760 43KKL2008 BTB Koh Kralor Doun Ba Khvaeng 5634-III 308981 1410404 53,607139 39 M 12283 47MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Chrey Don Try 2060501 5734-4 341457 1420751 38,900140 40 M 09332 49MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Chrey Don Try 2060501 5734-4 340809 1420203 19,400141 41 M 11710 24MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prek Chik chrang Kpos 318085 1389747 70,987142 42 M 11708 24MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prek Chik chrang Kpos 316024 1389147 128,265143 43 M 06528-B 11MRS2008 BTB Mong Russey Prek Chik Chhouk 5634-2 321741 1391289 96,249144 44 M 09335 29MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prek Chik Chhouk 322245 1392165 60,000145 45 M 09327 13MRS2008 BTB Mong Russey Prek Chik Kam Reang 5634-2 323020 1394086 224,069146 46 M 09328 14MRS2008 BTB Mong Russey Prek Chik Kam Reang 5634-2 323182 1394375 157,186147 47 M 12748 27MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prek Chik Prek Tavaen 2061104 327358 1395175 67,778148 48 M 09326 36MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Maung Paen 2060101 325151 1410113 52,000149 49 M 11434 37MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Maung Paen 2060101 325033 1409679 6,242150 50 M 10764 11MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Mukrea 2 2061205 345220 1383890 89,700151 51 M 12350 45MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Mukrea 2 2061205 5734-3 345888 1387795 20,900152 52 M 11715 08MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Roung 2061213 327546 1387793 103,591153 53 M 11712 50MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Roung 2061213 324679 1386533 90,093154 54 M 11714 53MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Roung 2061213 328015 1388675 150,561155 55 M 07169 21MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Srass Kuy 2061204 323139 1413234 87,500156 56 M 08152 23PPK2008 BTB Phnom Preuk O Rom Duol Sam Raung 5435-1 218410 1466279 10,054157 57 M 08472 17PPK2008 BTB Phnom Proek O Rom Duol O Rom Duol 5435-1 216247 1466262 44,010158 58 M 07176 22PPK09 BTB Phnom Proek Phnom Proek Ou 2110201 219530 1465315 180,643159 59 M 07181 09PPK2007 BTB Phnom Proek Phnom Proek Ou 2110201 5435-2 215846 1464452 69,659160 60 M 09080 58PPK2008 BTB Phnom Proek Phnom Proek Tual Kpaus 5435-1 218116 1474382 40,318161 61 M 09079 34PPK2008 BTB Phnom Preuk Phnom Preuk Tuol Khpuos 5435-1 218720 1473676 23,053162 62 M 06329 31PPK2008 BTB Phnom Preuk Pich Chen Da Phnom Touch 5435-2 221155 1462736 12,734163 63 M 06334-B 32PPK2008 BTB Phnom Preuk Pich Chen Da Phnom Touch 5435-2 217392 1461872 15,160164 64 M 11759 06RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdau BadakCheung 2070114 268951 1436761 185,510165 65 M 12368 07RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdau BadakCheung 2070114 269093 1436727 176,668166 66 M 12370 08RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdau Kok Choer 2070108 276526 1429773 49,596167 67 M 12369 09RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdau Kok Choer 2070108 277421 1429184 38,748168 68 M 12353 10RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdau Kok Choer 2070108 277079 1429972 133,602169 69 M 09341 53RMD2008 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdao Andeouk 11 5534-1 276719 1433231 19,188170 70 M 09342 54RMD2008 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdao Andeouk 11 5534-1 276666 1432430 62,441171 71 M 09340 38RMD2008 BTB Rotanak Mondol Sdao Andeouk 11 5534-1 276174 1433148 109,738

Page 4 of 36

Page 98:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

172 72 M 11806 03RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdau Neang Laem 2070110 272389 1432461 46,615173 73 M 09339 22RMD2008 BTB Rotanak Mondol Sdao Raksmei Sangha 5534-1 271144 1430157 450,605174 74 M 08823-B 06RMD2008 BTB Rotanak Mondol Sdao Raksmei Sangha 5534-1 268768 1430105 288,504175 75 M 08824-B 78RMD2008 BTB Rotanak Mondol Sdao Raksmei Sangha 5534-1 265842 1430442 51,504176 76 M 12355 25RDM09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Plov Meas Ou Lomoun 2070307 263146 1409621 58,332177 77 M 09590 26RMD2008 BTB Ratanak Mondul Plov Meas Chy Pang 5534-1 271334 1418074 20,042178 78 M 10129 17RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Plov Meas Ou Da 2070306 261381 1410044 103,611179 79 M 01816 44RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Traeng Kilo 38 2070405 278353 1423261 20,532180 80 M 10439 43RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Traeng Kilo 38 2070405 275949 1424689 201,490181 81 M 10479 47RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Traeng PhCheav 2070402 269071 1422973 1,124,115 2,059,771182 82 M 10345 58RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Traeng Kilo 2070401 273156 1420263 210,000183 83 M 10375 59RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Traeng Chea Montrey 2070403 272116 1421681 210,000184 84 M 10372 60RMD09 BTB Ratanak Mondul Traeng Chea Montrey 2070403 273083 1420395 210,000185 85 M 12351 13SPL09 BTB Sampeo Loun Tasda Chamkar Lohong 2100303 5435-1 215652 1485007 9,500186 86 M 10122 35SPL2008 BTB Sampov Loun Sampov Loun Thnal Bom Baek 5435-I 214405 1481823 5,536187 87 M 10124 37SPL2008 BTB Sampov Loun Sampov Loun Thnal Bom Baek 5435-I 214322 1481993 11,466188 88 M 12373 Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 293216 1360768 48,693189 89 M 12372 Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 292375 1357612 37,518190 90 M 12375 Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 292222 1355985 28,392191 91 M 05738-A Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 294998 1361010 19,491192 92 M 12696-A Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 291656 1356980 250,631193 93 M 05747-A Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 15060404 5633-4 291592 1360076 130,763194 94 M 12691-A Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 291785 1356976 252,777195 95 M 06530 Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Pramaoy 5633-4 294860 1361325 209,811196 96 M 07269-B Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Tumpor 5633-4 296927 1371667 47,488197 97 M 08507 Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Stung Thmey 15060403 5633-4 298745 1363868 36,369198 98 M 12374 Pursat Veal Veaeng Anlong Reap Chamkar ChreyCheung 5633-4 284985 1357724 26,120199 99 M 12693 Pursat Veal Veaeng Anlong Reap Chamkar ChreyCheung 15060303 5633-4 286240 1356465 61,307200 100 M 12694 Pursat Veal Veaeng Anlong Reap Chamkar ChreyTbong 15060304 5633-4 283375 1356967 56,590201 101 M 07281-A Pursat Veal Veaeng Krapeu Pi Samlanh 297277 1372542 56,118202 102 M 07281-B Pursat Veal Veaeng Krapeu Pi Samlanh 297651 1373501 47,645203 103 M 12734 Pursat Veal Veaeng Thmada Sangkum Thmey 253720 1342237 90,779204 104 M 12735 Pursat Veal Veaeng Thmada Sangkum Thmey 255507 1339976 78,579205 105 M 12367 Pursat Krako Thnot Chum Thmey 390025 1372839 11,915206 106 M 12377 Pursat Krako Thnot Chum Thmey 391186 1372335 26,427207 107 M 12366 Pursat Krako Thnot Chum Thmey 391059 1371280 42,003208 108 M 12365 Pursat Krako Thnot Chum Thmey 390986 1368843 286,633209 109 M 12364 Pursat Krako Thnot Chum Thmey 390970 1369082 69,837210 110 M 06736 Pursat Phnom Kravanh Sam Rong Angkraung 349269 1360972 220,448

DU#2 - Total Plan 11,506,303 2,059,771211 1 M 12749 13Ban09 BTB Banan Takream Slapang 2010810 269174 1440621 201,397212 2 M 10586 15BAN09 BTB Banan Snoeung Boeng Brey 2010706 5534-1 274568 1436315 38,136213 3 M 12747 27BAN09 BTB Banan Chaeng MeanChey Boskhnor 2010505 290035 1416585 130,916214 4 M 11386 BTB Banan Kantueu Muoy Thmei 2010101 5634-4 299330 1424665 50,480215 5 M 01244 BTB Banan Kantueu Muoy Thmei 2010101 5634-4 299284 1424163 47,230

110 MFs are planned

Page 5 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

216 6 M 08664-A 62BAV2007 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 5535-2 262775 1452835 28,900217 7 M 08664-B 63BAV2007 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 5535-2 262970 1453125 41,245218 8 M 08664-C 64BAV2007 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 5535-2 262850 1452780 49,712219 9 M 08664-D 65BAV2007 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 5535-2 262893 1452752 33,583220 10 M 08664-E 66BAV2007 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 5535-2 262925 1452727 35,102221 11 M 08664-F 67BAV2007 BTB Bavel Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 5535-2 262960 1452699 46,079222 12 M 12706 09BAV09 BTB Bavael Khdol Ta Hen Boeng Anlok 2040616 5535-2 266996 1453893 94,436223 13 M 12360 22BAV09 BTB Bavael Khdol Ta Hen Buor Sangkreach 2040706 5535-2 257685 1449606 26,857224 14 M 08662-B 33BAV09 BTB Bavael Khdol Ta Hen Kam Pong Kmak 2040626 5535-2 264810 1451390 235,359225 15 M 12371 23BAV09 BTB Bavael Khdol Ta Hen Anlong Raing 2040624 261248 1451323 35,967226 16 M 07643 24BAV09 BTB Bavael Khdol Ta Hen Anlong Raing 2040621 260381 1451122 15,632227 17 M Nil 45BAV09 BTB Bavael Khdol Ta Hen Boeng Chum Neang 2040409 61,800228 18 M 08657 02kAM09 BTB Kamrieng Ou Da Lomphath 2120306 234276 1449976 254,360229 19 M 08656 04KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Ou Da Lomphath 2120306 232451 1450240 200,000230 20 M 05497-E 54KAM2007 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou An Luok 5435-2 217870 1458500 28,103231 21 M 05497-C 54KAM2007 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou An Luok 5435-2 218125 1459237 41,784232 22 M 05497-D 54KAM2007 BTB Kamrieng Tasaen Ou An Luok 5435-2 218004 1459067 5,217233 23 M 09871 82KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Takrey Tuol Til 248901 1450638 187,800234 24 M 9870 85KAM09 BTB Kamrieng Takrey Tuol Til 2120604 249666 145066 325,625235 25 M 12745 13Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Preah Phos Sach Hab 2130401 315735 1407858 6,617236 26 M 12702 16Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Preah Phos Koy Vaeng 2130406 311426 1403275 9,073237 27 M 12746 28Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey Toul Mates 2130109 305652 1423114 125,911238 28 M 12695 26Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey Tuol Mates 2130109 308129 1423490 32,075239 29 M 01410-B 46KKL2008 BTB Koh Kralor Tebadey Ta Thok 5634-IV 310190 1422230 146,500240 30 M 12270 37KKL09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey Tathok 2130106 5634-4 306198 1417159 498,900241 31 M 12271 38KKL09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey Tathok 2130106 5534-4 306467 1419205 275,306242 32 M 12361 29Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Thipadey kantuot 2130102 311040 1424290 19,825243 33 M 12704 44Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Chhnal Moan Prey Sen 2130605 305886 1405174 73,476244 34 M 12703 44Kkl09 BTB Koh Kralor Chhnal Moan Prey Sen 2130605 306020 1402730 75,684245 35 M 10757 01KKL09 BTB Koh Kralor Chhnal Moan Krangsvat 2130602 305464 1405380 13,000246 36 M Nil 03KKL09 BTB Koh Kralor Chhnal Moan Krangsvat 2130602 15,000247 37 M 07169 09MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Mukrea 2 2061205 346213 1391922 129,312248 38 M 08820 10MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Mukrea 2 2061205 347494 1387207 75,000249 39 M 11713 52MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Roung 2061213 328763 1388970 19,698250 40 M 02358 44MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Maung koh Cha 2060103 323588 1414966 11,262251 41 M 12281 39MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Maung OU Krabao 2060102 5634-1 323129 1413310 203,600252 42 M 07981 05MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Paen 2061211 335602 1387340 227,500253 43 M 07982 05MRS09 BTB Maung Russey Prey Tralach Paen 2061211 334165 1389108 223,496254 44 M 08519 06PPK09 BTB Phnom Proek Phnom Proek Koky 2110105 215674 1475338 47,959255 45 M Nil 30PPK09 BTB Phnom Proek Phnom Proek DamNakAmpil 2110406 30,000256 46 M 08523 40PPK2008 BTB Phnom Proek Baraing Thluk Baraing Thleak 5435-1 214133 1476726 13,975257 47 M 08532 12PPK2008 BTB Phnom Proek Barang Thlak O Chaut 5435-1 214189 1476618 8,687258 48 M 08231-B 10RMD2007 BTB Ratanak Mondul Sdao Andeouk 11 5534-1 274707 1433159 45,157259 49 M 04239 Pursat Veal Veaeng Pramaoy Stung Thmey 15060403 5633-4 299168 1363288 78,236260 50 M 04855-A Pousat Veal Veng Anlong Reab Krang Rongeng 15060302 5633-4 285494 1358094 44,847

Page 6 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

261 51 M 04855-B Pousat Veal Veng Anlong Reab Krang Rongeng 15060302 5633-4 285276 1358187 37,630262 52 M 04855-C Pousat Veal Veng Anlong Reab Krang Rongeng 15060302 5633-4 285097 1358209 46,072263 53 M 12736 Pursat Veal Veaeng Thmada Sangkum Thmey 5533-3 256495 1337460 85,235264 54 M 12737 Pursat Veal Veaeng Thmada Sangkum Thmey 5533-3 258660 1335940 66,450265 55 M 06737 Pursat Phnom Kravanh Sam Rong Angkraung 345557 1360548 268,768266 56 M 06632 Pursat Phnom Kravanh Sam Rong Angkraung 345255 1360675 236,090

DU#2 -Total Spare 5,406,061267 1 M 12212 02BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Bor Yakha 24010404 5534-4 236534 1422735 66,691 Plan 2009268 2 M 12340 08BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Au Chralech 24010401 5534-4 236678 1420716 67,247 Plan 2009269 3 M 12337 04BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Au Snguot 24010402 5534-4 236031 1420987 69,129 Plan 2009270 4 M 06272 11BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Bar Tangsu 24010405 5534-4 234426 1424409 90,455 Plan 2009271 5 M 06278 117 BYK2008 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Bar Tangsu 24010405 5534-4 235093 1424576 7,013 03122 from spare 2008272 6 M 12339 01PLN2009 Pailin Pailin Pailin Pech Kiry 24010501 5534-4 253728 1424016 34,032 Plan 2009273 7 M 08393-C 05PLN2008 Pailin Pailin Pailin Au Tabrang 24010103 5534-4 240136 1419099 41,430 split From Plan 2008274 8 M 08712 06OTV2009 Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Bang Roloem 240102/# 5534-4 252586 1417150 57,600 Plan 2009275 9 M 08323 04OTV2009 Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Au Broes 24010206 5534-4 248896 1416072 71,222 Plan 2009276 10 M 05836-C 02OTV2008 Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Kra Chab 24010207 5535-2 256533 1410810 48,599 From Plan 2008277 11 M 05834-B 02OTV2009 Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Kra Chab 24010209 5534-4 254933 1413136 52,210 Plan 2009278 12 M 06810 01TLV2006 Pailin Pailin Tuol lvea Cham kakafe 24010302 5534-4 238973 1424848 19,941 03150 From Plan 2008279 13 M 08717 01TLV2008 Pailin Pailin Tuol lvea Au Chrakoeut 24010304 5534-4 238381 1423218 36,198 From Plan 2008280 14 M 08846 01TLV2009 Pailin Pailin Tuol lvea Phum Tmey 24010310 5534-4 238162 1420256 44,390 Plan 2009281 15 M 05425-B 02OND2006 Pailin Salakrao Au Ondong Au Ondong 24020405 5534-4 240089 1429709 19,680 03060, 03059 from spare 2008282 16 M 08774 01OND2009 Pailin Salakrao Au Ondong Au Ondong 24020408 5534-4 240029 1429854 92,776 Plan 2009283 17 M 07408-B 103 OND2008 Pailin Salakrao Au Ondong Thnol keng 24020403 5535-3 254908 1433975 41,236 From Plan 2008284 18 M 09549 11SLK2009 Pailin Salakrao Salakrao kas kev 24020108 5534-3 249000 1448440 137,107 Plan 2009285 19 M 12206 02SLK2009 Pailin Salakrao Salakrao Sre Onteakk 24020109 5535-3 244476 1446580 39,456 Plan 2009286 20 M 10845 101 SLK2008 Pailin Salakrao Salakrao Phum Koy 24020105 5535-3 239268 1438898 41,807 02972 from spare 2008287 21 M 09654 04STT2009 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang Dey Sar 24020220 5534-3 255107 1446646 57,546 Plan 2009288 22 M 09501 11STT2009 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang Prai Sontas 24020213 5535-3 253540 1442920 95,612 Plan 2009289 23 M 04776 05STT2009 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang Au Dontaleu 24020212 5535-3 253232 1444731 122,961 Plan 2009290 24 M 09581 07STT2009 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang kon Domrey 24020215 5534-4 255381 1436048 207,292 Plan 2009291 25 M 09895 06STT2009 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang Phum Pleal 24020209 5535-3 252970 1447530 104,250 Plan 2009292 26 M 10848-B 11STT2008 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang Bay Sey 5535-3 250692 1446235 31,280 From Plan 2008293 27 M 08999 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang Phnom Krenh 5535-3 250195 1448337 56,357294 28 M 12208 40SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Au Samrel Ausamreleu 2091002 5534-2 275163 1406409 38,975 plan 2009295 29 M 12210 71SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Au Samrel Ausamreleu 2091002 5534-2 275133 1406403 38,130 plan 2009296 30 M 12346 67SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Mean Chey Sre Chipao 2090605 5534-2 269176 1407232 80,713 plan 2009297 31 M 04738 25SAM07 Battanbang Samlout Mean Chey Am Pib 02090405 5534-2 266506 1406427 Rese & Agr 84,486 Splitted from 2008298 32 M 03519-C 68SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Mean Chey Am Pib 020906\# 5534-3 266178 1406148 Agr 144,954 from plan 2008299 33 M 03617 72SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Mean Chey Tanon 2090606 5534-2 262771 1406978 39,739 plan 2009300 34 M 12334 55SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Mean Chey Tanon 2090606 5534-2 262587 1407090 30,494 plan 2009301 35 M 06937 Battanbang Samlout Kompong Lpao Au Choamleu 5534-2 273984 1387349 32,827302 36 M 09603 32SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Sung Kagn Chang 2090406 5534-2 260045 1391455 38,316 plan 2009303 37 M 12332 73SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Sung Kagn Chang 2090406 5534-2 259425 1390345 7,617 plan 2009304 38 M 10016 51SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Sung Kon Dal 02090403 5534-2 258342 1396290 Road Res school 59,475 from plan 2008305 39 M 10018 50SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Sung Kon Dal 02090403 5534-2 259486 1393570 Road 26,753 from plan 2008

56 MFs are to spare

Page 7 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

306 40 M 11850 12SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Samlout Samlout 2090503 5534-3 255006 1401357 60,936 plan 2009307 41 M 12336 55SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Samlout Samlout 2090503 5534-2 253120 1401181 75,267 plan 2009308 42 M 10022 117SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Ta Tork Au Tateak 02090107 5533-1 263678 1381270 Resetl 46,309 from plan 2008309 43 M 10033 126SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Ta Tork Veal Roloem 02090103 5533-1 264407 1379032 Resetl 71,395 from plan 2008310 44 M 09601 125SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Ta Tork Veal Roloem 02090103 5533-1 264341 1378381 Resetl 23,002 from plan 2008311 45 M 09602 120SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Ta Tork Veal Roloem 02090103 5533-1 264297 1379539 Resetl 16,499 from plan 2008312 46 M 12331 03SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Ta Tork Veal Roloem 2090103 5533-1 264335 1378362 24,642 plan 2009313 47 M 06029-B Moved from 07 Battanbang Samlout Ta Sagn Don Troek 02090705 5534-2 277272 1400928 Road 58,817 Splitted from 2008314 48 M 06803-B 03SAM06 Battanbang Samlout Ta Sagn PraiRomchek 02090907 5534-2 269076 1403367 Road 43,208 Splitted from 2008315 49 M 06895 51SAM06 Battanbang Samlout Ta Sagn Sre Reach 02090604 5534-2 256079 1393875 other 22,213 from Spare 2008

DU#3 - Total Plan 2,818,284316 1 M 04766 09BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Bar Huycheung 24010406 5534-4 231033 1424707 24,804 Plan 2009317 2 M 06270 12BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Bar Tangsu 24010405 5534-4 234308 1424403 37,296 Plan 2009318 3 M 05857-C 130 BYK2008 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Bar Tangsu 24010405 5534-4 230509 1426062 50,247 from spare 2008319 4 M 08502 10BYK2009 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Rong Chak 24010408 5534-4 236269 1420785 138,127 Plan 2009320 5 M 08082-E 131BYK2008 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Au Chralech 24010401 5534-4 236999 1420410 29,952 From Plan 2008321 6 M 08082-C 131 BYK2008 Pailin Pailin Bor Yakha Au Chralech 24010101 5534-4 237327 1419955 55,820 from spare 2008322 7 M 05970-C 110 PLN2008 Pailin Pailin Pailin Suon Ampaokeut 24010104 5534-4 249173 1423638 67,328 from spare 2008323 8 M 07987 09OTV2008 Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Dey Kraham 24010205 5534-4 253186 1418475 64,489 03048 From Plan 2008324 9 M 08320-C Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Au Broes 24010206 5534-4 251591 1416622 63,874 split From Plan 2008325 10 M 08325 03OTV2009 Pailin Pailin Au Tavao Au Broes 24010206 5534-4 250157 1416168 83,435 Plan 2009326 11 M 12341 03SLK2009 Pailin Salakrao Salakrao Sre Onteakk 24020109 5535-3 243911 1445965 85,510 Plan 2009327 12 M 12205 01SLK2009 Pailin Salakrao Salakrao Phnum Koy 24020106 5534-4 239540 1440951 21,878 Plan 2009328 13 M 09190 13STT2008 Pailin Salakrao Stoeng Trang kon Domrey 24020215 5534-4 255489 1436229 230,922 From Plan 2008329 14 M 10027 118SAM2008 Battanbang Samlout Ta Sagn Don Troek 02090906 5534-2 272483 1397721 Resetl 184,166 from Spare 2008330 15 M 12333 57SAM09 Battanbang Samlout Mean Chey Sre Sdao 2090603 5534-2 268895 1409487 117,648 plan 2009

DU#3 -Total Spare 1,255,496331 1 M 11372 04CKS2008 Preah Vihea Choam Ksan Kan Tout Sra Em 13030602 5937-4 470457 1587355 Russei Pagoda 86,120332 2 M 11373 05CKS2008 Preah Vihea Choam Ksan Kan Tout Sra Em 13030604 5937-4 470055 1587120 Russei School 46,112333 3 M 07909 03CKS2009 Preah Vihea Choam Ksan Kan Tout Anlong Veng 13030603 5937-3 457134 1574694 Anlong Veng School 98,141334 4 M 08167-B 02CKS2008 Preah Vihea Choam Ksan Kan Tout Char 13030604 5937-3 458184 1571506 Phum Char Chas (CBD) 122,397335 5 M 11493 17ROV2009 Preah Vihea Rovieng Reak Sa Pula Kam 13050907 6036-3 516412 1497887 Prey Khmorch (School) 84,600336 6 M 09278 05TBY2009 Preah Vihea Tbeng Meanchey Chhean Muk Moha Phal 13070303 5936-1 493620 1521341 Chong Tumnub 95 39,281337 7 M 11380 02TBY2009 Preah Vihea Tbeng Meanchey Pal Hal Mar Saet 13070201 5936-2 497352 1520856 Helecopter (HLZ) 271,303338 8 M 11379 03KLN2009 Preah Vihea Kulen Sra Yang Sra Yang Choeung 13040601 5936-4 451754 1515119 Banteay Choam Pring 165,543339 9 M 06755 09KLN2009 Preah Vihea Kulen Sra Yang Rum Check 13040605 5936-4 446130 1527194 Khnong Phum Rumcheck 193,597340 10 M 11377 15KLN2009 Preah Vihea Kulen Sra Yang Kos Ker 13040603 5936-4 450656 1524565 Kos Ker School 122,397341 11 M 06621-C 038KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Sambo Sam Bo Sam Bo 06050302 6034-4 505721 1423733 Prasat Sambo 381,463342 12 M 12241 020KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Sa Kream Veal Thnol 06040409 5935-2 474555 1460473 Toul Chakranhanh 342,880343 13 M 12311 021KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Sa Kream Veal Thnol 06040402 5935-2 474601 1460061 Toul Chakranhanh 65,034344 14 M 12240 031KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Phan Nhoem Phdeak 06040303 5935-2 476300 1442910 Tum Nub Phum Phdeak 210,315345 15 M 12231 029KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Phan Nhoem Kra Nhung 06040305 5935-2 476429 1441493 Trapeang Boeng 147,323346 16 M 12229 034KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Phan Nhoem Kra Nhung 6040305 5935-2 0474662 1438354 Bos Kor 27,639347 17 M 12313 028KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Krayea Krayea Thbong 06040203 5935-2 474488 1449741 O'Lveang 57,817348 18 M 02535-D 026KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Krayea Krayea Choeng 06040202 5935-2 473960 1452306 Cham Bok Korng 42,844349 19 M 02535-F 027KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Krayea Krayea Choeng 06040202 5935-2 473706 1453033 Cham Bok Korng 71,562350 20 M 12312 027KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Krayea Krayea Choeng 06040202 5935-2 473684 1453509 Cham Bok Korng 488,946

49 MFs are planned

15 MFs are to spare

Page 8 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

351 21 M 10494 SR003 Siem Reap Ankor Thom Chop Tatrav Trapeang Tuk 17020101 5736-2 374218 1504259 8,413352 22 M 10498 SR004 Siem Reap Ankor Thom Chop Tatrav Trapeang Tuk 17020101 5736-2 373747 1505245 3,053353 23 M 10497 SR006 Siem Reap Ankor Thom Chop Tatrav Trapeang Tuk 17020101 5736-2 373740 1505161 9,906354 24 M 10492 SR008 Siem Reap Ankor Thom Chop Tatrav Top Svay 17020103 5736-2 369607 1507027 10,644355 25 M 08677 SR009 Siem Reap Siem Reap Pram Sasar Thlok 17120303 5636-2 334501 1521745 Water Source 180,445

DU#4 - Total Plan 3,277,775356 1 M 09478 05CKS2009 Preah Vihea Choam Ksan Rumdoh Sre Rolum Thmar 13030602 6037-3 0493381 1567567 Ktum Andong 94,522357 2 M 11374 01KLN2009 Preah Vihea Kulen Sra Yang Sra Yang Tbong 13040602 5936-4 451605 1510582 Choam Kamheng 81,677358 3 M 09482-B 10TBY2009 Preah Vihea Tbeng Meanchey Pal Hal Satha Por 13070206 5936-1 496000 1526087 O'chas Val (North Road) 77,688359 4 M 11381 01TBY2009 Preah Vihea Tbeng Meanchey Pal Hal Mar Saet 13070201 5936-2 497544 1521001 Helecopter (HLZ) 213,244360 5 M 07744-B 039KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Sambo Sam Bo Sam Bo 6050302 6034-4 0504218 1424080 Prasat Sambo 274,482361 6 M 12242 023KTM Kampong Thom Prasat Balang Sa Kream Sa Kream Tbong 6040411 5935-2 0473310 1456311 Toul Chamkalo 86,681362 7 M 10495 SR001 Siem Reap Ankor Thom Chop Tatrav Trapeang Tuk 17020101 5736-2 373976 1504793 38,702363 8 M 10496 SR002 Siem Reap Ankor Thom Chop Tatrav Trapeang Tuk 17020101 5736-2 373791 1505019 15,921

DU#4 -Total Spare 882,917364 1 M 10095 Siem Reap SreSnam Sleng Spean Damnak Damrey 17120604 5736-4 347820 1538848 Damnak Damrey E 48,421365 2 M 10096 Siem Reap SreSnam Sleng Spean Damnak Damrey 17120604 5736-4 347893 1538816 Damnak Damrey D 34,675366 3 M 09220 Siem Reap SreSnam Sleng Spean Damnak Damrey 17120604 5736-4 348011 1539012 Damnak Damrey C 35,252367 4 M 10102 Siem Reap SreSnam Sleng Spean Damnak Damrey 17120604 5736-4 351026 1538694 Damnak Damrey dey A 18,898368 5 M 10103 Siem Reap SreSnam Sleng Spean Damnak Damrey 17120604 5736-4 351635 1538576 Damnak Damrey dey B 24,503369 6 M 10097 Siem Reap SreSnam Maung Lovea 17120405 5736-4 347309 1520613 Phum Lovea A 67,432370 7 M 10101 Siem Reap SreSnam Maung Lovea 17120405 5736-4 346706 1521430 Trapeang Veal C 55,598371 8 M 12106 Siem Reap Varin Sre Nouy Sre Nouy 17140301 5836-4 392632 1528221 Trapeang Rokar Choeung B 101,291372 9 M 12079 Siem Reap Varin Sre Nouy Sre Po 17140302 5836-4 395782 1524095 kok Chas Banteay Youn F 22,180373 10 M 10983 Siem Reap Varin Varin Rumduol 17140502 5736-1 375523 1533874 Salarien H 28,912374 11 M 10984 Siem Reap Varin Varin Rumduol 17140502 5736-1 375023 1533248 Wat Sovann Botom F 18,098375 12 M 10985 Siem Reap Varin Varin Rumduol 17140502 5736-1 374873 1533620 Andong Out Phum Rumduol 22,444376 13 M 01550 Siem Reap Varin Varin Rumduol 17140502 5736-1 374941 1533629 Phum Rumduol C 33,456377 14 M 02709 Siem Reap Varin Varin Rumduol 17140502 5736-1 374928 1533638 Phum Rumduol B 169,383378 15 M 04651 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Beng Raing Sey 22020210 5637-2 313802 1561843 Prasat Chaeng 102,314379 16 M 12039 45 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Khpos Kouk Khpos 22020301 5637-2 320087 1574025 Kouk Prang 37,833380 17 M 12038 47 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Khpos Kouk Khpos 22020301 5637-2 320749 1574541 Trapeang Thnal 29,596381 18 M 12035 41 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Khpos Tonle Sar 22020305 5637-2 323416 1566293 O' Rumdual Tonlesar 119,852382 19 M 12036 40 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Khpos Tonle Sar 22020305 5637-2 324006 1567246 Trapeang Svay 194,739383 20 M 12034 43BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Khpos Tonle Sar 22020305 5637-2 324313 1565907 Kouk Samraong 2 28,374384 21 M 07748 33 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Mon Kanh Chrieb 22020406 5637-2 322821 1566009 O' Romdual Kanhchrieb 92,292385 22 M 12031 38 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Mon Kanh Chrieb 22020406 5637-2 317763 1563624 Prey Raing 62,259386 23 M 12032 39 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Mon Kanh Chrieb 22020406 5637-2 320193 1566384 Prei Sleuk Prey 94,755387 24 M 07741 48 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Mon Kanh Chrieb 22020406 5637-2 317783 1565224 Ou Barei / Trapeang kak 27,720388 25 M 12028 34 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Mon Thmor Don 22020415 5637-1 317854 1585692 Khse K 5 Ti 1 83,653389 26 M 12027 35 BLA2009 O.Meachey Banteay Ampil Kouk Mon Thmor Don 22020415 5637-1 318066 1585584 Khse K 5 Ti 2 66,512390 27 M 12066 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Chhouk Meas 22040603 5737-2 369361 1574326 Banteay Sivutha Para 50,905391 28 M 12064 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Kok Phluk 22040602 5737-3 363757 1575708 Salarien Kok Phluk 29,971392 29 M 04018 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Kok Prasat 22040606 5737-4 354706 1585019 Banteay Chas VN 214,039393 30 M 12067 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Cheu Kraom 22040604 5737-4 350542 1579740 Kouk Khmaoch 39,458

8 MFs are to spare

25 MFs are planned

Page 9 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

394 31 M 12059 05 TPT2009 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Preah Pralay O Rumdual 22050403 5937-3 446008 1574624 Phum O'romduol 2 195,471395 32 M 12097 04 TPT2009 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Preah Pralay Tram Chan 22050405 5937-3 446745 1574933 Toul Charan Tram Chan 1 108,062396 33 M 12098 96 TPT2009 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Preah Pralay Tram Chan 22050405 5937-3 446626 1574817 Toul Charan Tram Chan 2 109,404397 34 M 12108 19 TPT2009 O.Meanchey Trap. Prasat Preah Pralay Banteay Chas 22050402 5837-1 445841 1585169 Chub Run 1 101,199398 35 M 12107 17 TPT2009 O.Meanchey Trap. Prasat Preah Pralay Preah Pralay 22050401 5837-1 445860 1585138 Chub Run 2 72,832399 36 M 12047 15 TPT2009 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Bak Anloung Meanchey 22050101 5837-2 435039 1573088 Anloung Saam 44,523400 37 M 12046 14 TPT2009 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Bak Anloung Meanchey 22050101 5837-2 435058 1573095 Anloung Saam Khang Kaet 45,002

DU#6 - Total Plan 2,631,308401 1 M 10100 Siemreap SreSnam Maung Lovea 17120405 5736-4 347446 1520766 Phum Lovea B 293,051402 2 M 12080 Siemreap Varin Sre Nouy Sre Po 17140302 5835-4 396023 1523701 Dey Salarien Phum Sre Po 43,139403 3 M 12073 Siemreap Varin Sre Nouy Sre Nouy 17140301 5836-4 392632 1528221 Trapeang Rokar Choeung A 196,933404 4 M 06672 O.Meachey Chong Kal Pongro Ta Paen 22030404 5737-3 348557 1557431 Kok Prasat 106,178405 5 M 12026 O.Meachey Chong Kal Krasang Kouk Spean 22030304 5736-4 336142 1550564 Chrab 3 72,247406 6 M 07780 O.Meanchey Samraong Kon Kriel Chhouk Meas 220403# 5737-1 369373 1573978 Phlov Tamok Chas 32,528407 7 M 07779 O.Meanchey Samraong Kon Kriel Chhouk Meas 220403# 5737-1 368396 1575078 Phlov Kroy Phum 27,326408 8 M 12025 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Bos 22030304 57374 361226 1578184 Phlov Phum Bos 2 43,512409 9 M 07781 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Trapeang Sleng 22040308 5737-4 349161 1576963 trapeang Smach 80,514410 10 M 12065 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Kok Phluk 22040602 5737-3 363492 1573923 Sraash Teuk Laak 71,733411 11 M 05173 O.Meachey Samraong Kon Kriel Kok Phluk 22040602 5737-3 365121 1576368 Phlov Tamok Chaas 35,433412 12 M 12094 04 ANV2009 O.Meachey Anlong Veng Trapeang Tav Ta Dev 22010308 5737-2 385538 1569813 Prey Thom (Banteay VN ) 43,453413 13 M 12058 01 TPT2009 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Preah Pralay O Rumdual 22050403 5937-3 446262 1574500 Phlov Toul Charan 59,380414 14 M 12050 O.Meachey Trap. Prasat Bak Anloung Tuol Praseu 22050103 5837-2 433495 1572095 Phlov Tov Phlov Baraing 27,377

DU#6 -Total Spare 1,132,804415 1 U 12348 Kampong Cham Batheay Tang Krasang Keat 03011006 3933-2 494678 1337167 44,307416 2 M 12581 Kampong Cham Chamkaleu Svay Teab Thnolbak Leac 03020606 6033-2 530308 1360809 38,867417 3 U 10266 Kampong Cham Tboung Khmum Chub Chub Krav 03160803 6132-4 565495 1317090 29,634418 4 U 09808-C Kampong Cham Tboung Khmum Suong Chrey Bet Meas 03161903 6132-4 572715 1315415 22,913419 5 U 11726 Kampong Cham Dam Bae Kouk Srok Trapeang ruessei 03040306 6133-2 600011 1326275 EDD 294,178420 6 U 09812-C Kampong Cham Dam Bae Kouk Srok Trapeang ruessei 03040306 6133-2 600469 1325969 166,244421 7 U 10003 Kampong Cham Dam Bae Kouk Srok Trapeang ruessei 03040306 6133-2 600003 1326452 225,298422 8 U 10738 Kampong Cham Dam Bae Dam Bae Khcheay 03040205 6133-2 595867 1331199 95,399423 9 M 10197 Kampong Cham Dam Bae Dam Bae Khcheay 03040205 6133-2 597115 1332164 102,451424 10 U 10263-A Kampong Cham Ponhea Kraek Trapang Plong Trapang Plong 1 03120813 6232-3 605703 1290491 EDD 321,428425 11 U 12347 Kampong Cham Ponhear Krek Kondol Chum Toul Chamka 03120637 6132-1 589607 1308637 6,784426 12 U 12397 Kampong Cham Prey Chhor Kveat Thom Kveat Thom 03130401 6033-3 524582 1332816 10,414427 13 U 10742-B Kampong Cham Prey Chhor Krouch Thmey 03130606 6033-3 521384 1346279 EDD 95,627428 14 U 12580 Kampong Cham Prey Chhor Chey Vean Preay Totung 03130317 6033-2 527670 1332655 43,707429 15 U 12564 Kampong Cham Prey Chhor Mean Kloy Ti Muy 03130815 6033-2 530857 1332318 75,260430 16 U 12399 Kampong Cham Cheung Pray Pdav Chum Pdav Chum Lech 03030301 6033-2 503703 1327634 16,400431 17 U 12394 Kampong Cham Cheung Pray Preng Chrum Preng Chrum 03030501 6033-3 506365 1345242 1,379432 18 U 12396 Kampong Cham Cheung Pray Sampong Chay Sampong Chay 03030610 6033-3 513791 1347802 9,392433 19 U 12391 Kampong Cham Cheung Pray Sampong Chay Ba Khorm 03030609 6033-3 514306 1346922 23,900434 20 U 10981-B Kracheh Kratie Kou Loab Kou Loab 10020504 6234-3 614623 1384434 48,705435 21 U 09488-B Kracheh Kratie Kou Loab Kou Loab 10020504 6234-3 615847 1384996 EDD 79,483

37 MFs are planned

14 MFs are to spare

Page 10 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

436 22 U 12588 Kracheh Snuol Snuol Snuol Khang Kaeut 10050305 6233-2 655413 1336450 19,820437 23 U 12567 Stueng Traeng Sesan Kamhpun Kamhpun 19010101 6132-2 618552 1497364 25,385438 24 U 12565 Stueng Traeng Sesan Kamhpun Kamhpun 19010101 6132-2 617694 1497832 19,988439 25 U 12590 Stueng Traeng Stung Treng Stung Treng Preak 19040101 6136-2 604269 1494532 19,460440 26 U 12563 Stueng Traeng Stung Treng Stung Treng Preak 19040101 6136-2 605006 1493309 24,723441 27 U 12589 Stueng Traeng Stung Treng Stung Treng Reacheanokol 19040501 6135-1 616813 1484872 20,383442 28 U 12566 Stueng Traeng Stung Treng Stung Treng Spean Thmor 19040106 6136-2 606176 1495088 36,689443 29 U 09493 Stueng Traeng Stung Treng Preah Bat Ba Choung 19040301 6136-2 602536 1495225 26,788444 30 U 12389 Svaay Rieng Romdul Pong tuek Bos touch 20030702 6131-2 598676 1239177 226,940445 31 U 12403 Svaay Rieng Svay Chrom Ang Tasu Meun Say 20050112 6131-3 575476 1241731 79,851446 32 U 11717 Svaay Rieng Svay Chrom Por Reach O Samlei 20051210 6131-3 582861 1232587 34,052447 33 U 12402 Svaay Rieng Svay Chrom Cham Bak Ta nou 20050302 6131-3 577054 1319182 7,087448 34 U 12401 Svaay Rieng Svay Chrom Cham Bak Ta nou 20050302 6131-3 576860 1219575 47,775449 35 U 11724 Svaay Rieng Svay Chrom Por Reach Preay Klea 20051206 6131-3 563133 1231562 25,668450 36 U 11723 Svaay Rieng Svay Chrom Por Reach Preay Klea 20051206 6131-3 585630 1232400 33,311451 37 U 12116 Prey Veaeng Peam Ro Preaek Khsay Kha Phum Pram 14070705 6031-4 531486 1244100 6,427452 38 U 12118 Prey Veaeng Prey veaeng me bon Me bon 14100503 6031-1 542970 1276431 4,473453 39 U 12117 Prey Veaeng Kampong leav kampong leav Phum prammuoy 14110306 6031-1 535929 1269776 10,490454 40 U 12112 Prey Veaeng Kampong leav kampong leav Phum prammuoy 14110306 6031-1 535744 1270075 35,137455 41 U 12120 Prey Veaeng Preah sdach Angkor reach Krouch 14090101 6131-3 542046 1228180 40,236456 42 U 12121 Prey Veaeng Preah sdach Angkor reach Krasang tong 14090117 6131-3 542661 1225568 103,515457 43 U 12174 Prey Veaeng Preah sdach Chey kampok Tras 14090406 6031-3 540345 1229148 33,672458 44 U 12119 Prey Veaeng Preah sdach Kampong soeng Prey khla 14090504 6031-1 535399 1242929 32,478459 45 U 10735 Prey Veaeng Baphnom CheuKach CheuKach 14010301 6031-1 543951 1243904 4,244460 46 U 12406 Prey Veaeng Baphnom CheuKach CheuKach 14010302 6031-2 543932 1244096 21,600461 47 U 12726 Prey Veaeng Baphnom CheuKach CheuKach 14010303 6031-3 544085 1244119 23,084462 48 U 12723 Prey Veaeng Baphnom CheuKach CheuKach 14010304 6031-4 544121 1243978 13,702463 49 U 12412 Prey Veaeng Kampong Trabak Ansong Ansaong 14030103 6131-3 559635 1229719 7,955464 50 U 12410 Prey Veaeng Kampong Trabak Cham Roluos 1403208 6131-3 561516 1216471 47,090465 51 U 12411 Prey Veaeng Kampong Trabak Thkov Pouthi Vongs 14031303 6131-4 560981 1226461 15,265466 52 U 12395 Prey Veaeng Kampong Trabak Thkov Tbaeng 14031305 6131-5 561854 1225214 5,491467 53 U 12409 Prey Veaeng Kampong Trabak Thkov Thum 14031302 6131-6 562475 1226359 5,543468 54 U 12413 Prey Veaeng Kampong Trabak Kampong Trabak Tuol Roka 14030701 6131-7 551657 1231886 20,844

ERO - Total Plan 2,830,936469 1 U 09492-B Stung Treng Stung Treng Stung Treng Prak 19040101 6136-2 604076 1494181 793,727470 2 M 09200 Kampong Cham Memot Choam Kravien Phum Lvey 031003 / # 6232-2 651453 1298559 Phum Lvey 45,714471 3 U 09176 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 649715 1318022 Mapping 81,021472 4 U 09175 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 649704 1318031 Mapping 71,975473 5 U 09173 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 649571 1317858 Mapping 53,522474 6 U 09180 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 650068 1319309 Mapping 50,700475 7 U 09179 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 650057 1319305 Mapping 55,188476 8 U 09178 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 650148 1319035 Mapping 48,797

54 MFs are planned

Page 11 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

DescriptionSMA

identification( L1S …)

Area to be clear include

in the relevant SMA

is the village identified as contaminate

d in the Survey ? Yes/No

The village is not recorded in the survey. Give

explanation (for instance if is a new village )

+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S/N

Unit or CodeNo

Minefield Identification

Name of MF Coordinates (full reading UTM 48 Six figures x 2)

Gazetteer Phum code

Province Commune VillageDistrict

Area to be clearedLocation

if yes,

Surface Area (sqm)

Map

she

et

Landmark

Identification by the current L1S

is the proposed Task areas within one or more suspected Mined Areas (SMA) identified by the Survey?

if no,

477 9 U 09177 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 650137 1319036 Mapping 49,543478 10 U 09182 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 650083 1321070 Mapping 99,831479 11 U 09181 Kampong Cham Memot Tonlung Spean Chang Kum 03101406 6232-1 650073 1321075 Mapping 68,365480 12 U 10272 Kampong Cham Memot Memong Cham Khyang 03100705 6232-4 628762 1315148 Mapping 5,553481 13 U 10271 Kampong Cham Memot Choam Ngiev 13100201 6232-1 641787 1297603 Mapping 3,375

ERO - Total Spare 1,427,311482 1 U 11177 Kandal Angk Snuol Tuol Prech Boeng Khnar 08081621 5932-3 469826 1282454 3,705483 2 U 12822 Kampot Kampong Trach Kanthaor Khang Cheung Prey Koek 7060701 5930-3 447520 1172528 47,408484 3 U 12823 Kampot Kampot Trapeang Pring Bos Trabaek 7071703 5830-2 420466 1176240 28,247

HQ - Total Plan 79,360

Grand Total : 28,648,701 2,059,771

: 11,527,777

Seen and Approved by : Verifield by : Prepared by :

Oum Sang Onn Prak Sokhon Chhin Bunran

Director of Planning/Operation Planning/Operation coordinator Planning/OPS Officer

Date: 21 January 2009 Date: 21 January 2009 Date: 21 January 2009

3 MFs are planned

129 MFs are spare355 MFs are planned

13 MFs are to spare

Page 12 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

SOCIO ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT OF MINE CLEARANCE OPERATIONS - PROVISIONAL GUIDELINES ANNEXE II/2

Socio-Economic Data

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 461,573 45 350 1,900 39,972

2 15 82 375 27,4389 5 101 447 118,232

10 88,20810 128,37015 156,426

3 114,66517 172,06010 96,96910 81,99110 13 227 1,017 101,612

5 42,3325 47,9085 51,840

20 143,40950,871 1,69749,710 1,70159,385 2,04871,610

219 15 219 1,095 25,962 6468 34 371 1,586 89,2375 50,3545 50,0145 50,0234 84,4708 85,582

19 81,6177 39,4316 18 201 1,200 56,7532 15 218 1,393 23,5495 28 294 1,399 26,731

70,31983,847 3,376

7 76,8437 76,4897 76,705

Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

1,751

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

7 92 385

20 225 845

28879

4431186

310

1,221286

257

1,948

1,57633867

Land cleared Use

15

3,39460431

1,118

Page 13 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

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Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

7 75,1178 87,5186 61,4865 50,3675 63,4065 55,9112 11 182 665 20,532

10 100,15410 102,25510 100,020

5 49,9935 49,9055 50,8029 85,963

19 190,7165 50,4035 50,9025 50,403

2,088 16 63 297 50,00015 8348718 186,482

101,06095,18095,32895,47695,66095,836

101,76949,258

4,008 3 84 430 87,3727 10 76 312 24,9877 14,682

17 15,1659 17,3797 36 16 66,2841 5 2 7,5008 34 20 91,803

10 2 1 42 210 11,4307 28 10 2 187 941 100,5002 12 4 155 793 14,3275 25 13 304 1,359 16,983

10 457 13,987 65 647 7,493 35,413 83,487 4,091,203 11,430 154,166 3,376 257,538 6,092 906,91110 60,700

7 51,6807 51,653

14 51,7501,008 38 276 1,376 38,545 471

1,102

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Page 14 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

41,681 53039,923 500

14 35 315 1,653 162,2184 1,573 45 350 1,900 34,5562 20,6469 6 118 443 76,9379 72,1578 19 310 1,470 84,2865 49,3385 50,690

10 80 457 1,685 101,4303,132 31 320 1,386 91,129

93,76795,154

60 61 352 1,724 50,07431 10 270 1,050 56,524

7 2 15 187 941 22,6822 25,668

7 199 5,713 353 3,182 14,645 106,598 700,608 215,783 120,149 1,501 280,0505 6 116 612 74,811

25 114,888197 857 89,212 2973

35,523 1,18416,674 555

133,326 4,444191 4163 33,960 1132

10 206,0853 111,5318 237,137

35 128 579 105,2193 2 170 823 7,0907 30,9276 30,7962 80,2831 24,1015 158,7631 12,8621 3,2984 14,6188 59,500

1 1 21,0996 6 152,0121 1 49,300

25,009 19,723 1

197 967

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191 1,005

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Page 15 of 36

Page 109:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

9 118,77025 118,77016 82,100

3 36,400119 594 15 119 519 44,891 1,500

7 2 185 872 71,572104 10 104 457 30,438 1,522

130 5,500 153 1,230,10057 1705 5 57 246 46,179 1,650

186 50 186 930 37,500 2,12067 6 67 331 53,607 1,900

5 38,900325 19,400 1

70,987 2,370128,265 4,275

11 326 96,2496 60,000

40 224,06925 157,18670 9 126 5,822 67,778

8 52,0004 6,2425 89,700

404 20,900 1294 103,591 3,500294 90,093 3,000294 150,561 5,000421 5 421 2,129 87,500 2,900

1 9 74 330 10,0544 4 36 176 44,0106 180,643

4 4 69,6598 40,318

30 23,0533 12,7343 15,1607 185,5108 176,6684 49,5962 38,7487 133,602

107 3179 19,188 9593 62,441

10 109,73816 107 498

176 984

64 293

183 1594

35 741 3,388

8

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5

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194

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Page 16 of 36

Page 110:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

131 4 124 572 46,615 116 450,60526 288,50439 51,504

223 817 5 223 1,074 58,332 200075 11 75 392 20,04270 1 134 602 103,611

2 20,5327 201,490

20 75 574 2345 1,124,11520 49 254 1178 210,000

9 210,00010 210,000

4 10 56 251 9,5001 1 5,5361 1 11,466

7 48,69337,518 1,70028,392 1,300

19,49183 250,63113 130,76375 252,777

4 6 209,81141 869 2 41 206 47,488 1,000

8 5 416 2,736 36,36926,120 1

453 61,307 2,044130 401 6 130 527 56,590 1,887

56,118 1,10047,645 95090,779 3,02578,579 2,619

11,915 126,427 1,00042,003 2,100

16 286,6335 69,837

27 17 191 832 220,44818 5,985 27,943 131 748 12,253 64,761 1,338,212 4,958,484 3,222,261 137,338 4,423 1,684,735 57,287 38,315 3 46,615 1 60,852 3 19,491

57 334 1563 201,397269 269 1569 38,136 1

55 230 1147 130,91623 23 50,48015 15 47,230

2,4931,620

8 197 967

2 129

54278 542

78 380

916

77 198 3 77 291

129 182

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78 4

3 68 327

15 345 1,441

9 459 2146

28 224 951

26 266 1,291

Page 17 of 36

Page 111:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

2 2 28,9002 2 41,2452 2 49,7122 2 33,5832 2 35,1022 2 46,079

14 88 421 94,436113 1 113 531 26,857 1,342

5 3 105 905 235,359170 2184 35,967 1200

5 15,632109 2179 109 541 40,000 11,800 1 10000 1

10 254,36020 200,000

2 28,1033 41,7841 5,217

32 187,8008 325,625

15 3 37 125 6,617 150 6 45 291 9,073 1

125,911 4,0001,628 32,075 1,070

30 30 146,50024 498,900

8 275,306210 1,594 36 210 1,028 19,825 1,000

73,476 2,45075,684 2,500

185 13,000 12 15,000

129,312 4,3754307 75,000 2,500

140 294 1,238 19,698 19 2 87 437 11,262

22 616 2,726 203,600227,500 760223,496 750

15 937 10 115 591 47,9595 3 60 244 30,0002 30 120 656 13,975

11 5 57 296 8,687107 3,179 16 107 498 45,157 1,500

4 6 416 2,736 78,2365 44,847

941197 4,514 10 197

404 39 404 1,873

5 130 628

73 690 2 73 357

3 144 593

176 11 176 854

2 207 1,124

30 120 656

10 98611

2 170 823

Page 18 of 36

Page 112:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

5 37,6305 46,072

85,235 2,84166,450 2,286

12 268,76811 236,090

80 2,337 21,595 205 256 5,630 28,327 224,784 2,132,255 1,698,753 282,080 9,717 959,865 18,857 24,800 2 45,388 4 38,136 15 5 63 346 66,6915 5 90 438 67,2473 3 1 44 213 69,1294 4 90,4553 3 7,013

150 150 2,553 150 761 34,032 1.124287 2 287 1,348 41,430 1.345

15 16 6 170 680 57,6004 4 12 415 1,857 71,222

607 48,599 1.7315 315 1,552 52,210 1

2 10 2 94 449 19,94119 19 57 267 36,198

9 9 105 504 44,39019,680 0.642

4 4 92,776505 4 505 2,380 1,894 0 39,342 1

8 8 125 585 137,10721 21 3 187 780 39,456

3 3 3 221 1,083 41,80716 16 2 190 855 57,54610 10 3 159 910 95,61226 26 76 360 122,96116 16 3 195 2,014 207,29210 10 3 70 282 104,250

221 5 221 998 31,280 186 86 1,917 18 123 547 56,357 1,86010 10 38,97510 10 38,130

150 150 834 6 296 1,294 80,713 219 22 84,48624 24 144,954

3 3 39,7394 4 30,494

206 10 59 274 32,827 1169 38,316 1

7,617 014 14 52,475 1 7,000 1

248 26,753 1

291

7 132 658

77 198 3 77

3 93 408

169 921 16915 796

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Page 19 of 36

Page 113:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

150 60,936 275,267 3

12 12 6 41 197 46,3098 8 71,3954 4 23,0024 4 16,499

56 56 489 24,642 1233 6 233 1,215 58,817228 14 228 1,307 43,208 2

78 170 2 78 383 22,2131,371 1,461 12,325 284 229 6,292 30,109 373,711 1,124,333 517,107 649,541 1,879 39,827 2 91,552 2 22,213

103 103 588 103 482 24,804 12 2 37,296

181 50,247 41 71 368 138,127

5,811 29,9525,811 55,820

376 376 1,771 67,328 24 4 12 415 1,857 64,4896 6 63,8745 5 83,4356 6 3 187 780 85,5104 4 3 221 1,083 21,878

195 3 195 2,014 230,922 151 6 233 1,215 184,166

15 15 1 140 530 117,648146 196 12,962 40 2,627 13,253 184,166 464,333 147,924 142,379 7 230,922 1 85,772

86,12085 46,112 1

8 8 90 10 107 459 78,141 20,00014 14 21 140 530 122,397

60 2 51 144 84,600 15 5 5 147 655 39,281

285 30 285 1,301 271,3035 5 33 449 1,907 165,543

70 70 7 99 534 193,597150 9 157 617 122,397

50 6 210 1,053 381,46311 19 231 1,185 342,880

6 65,03435 12 152 890 210,315

8 147,3239 27,6393 71 316 1,690 57,8172 42,8444 71,562

16 488,946

264 14

40 280

1,006

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1,410

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512

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Page 20 of 36

Page 114:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

2 8,4133 3,0534 9,9064 36 160 901 10,644

35 20 136 705 180,445102 843 385 357 3,364 16,016 386,144 833,968 1,427,131 273,109 2 86,120 271,303

20 20 30 200 710 94,5227 7 46 392 1,732 81,677

22 22 15 238 1,178 77,688285 30 285 1,301 213,244210 6 210 1,053 274,482

20 20 195 948 86,68117 38,702

6 15,92149 587 162 1,613 7,439 81,677 94,522 218,992 487,72677 77 48,421

34,67535,252

18,89824,503

6 192 962 67,4325 55,5987 220 1,735 101,2915 86 446 22,180

224 28,912 118,098 1

6 22,44410 33,45620 169,383

98 4 `98 517 102,3143 37,8332 29,5965 119,852

10 194,7392 28,374

141 92,2924 62,2599 94,7553 27,720

83,65366,512

7 152 722 50,905160 160 740 29,971

7 84 432 214,0398 214 970 39,458

15 93

517

131 672

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587

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110

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5179315

Page 21 of 36

Page 115:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

Fam

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Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

30 96 436 195,47130 108,06230 109,404

70 70 345 101,19940 40 187 72,832

8 44,5232 45,002

77 296 631 384 4 2,083 11,534 502,462 1,067,184 422,478 135,693 58,883 1 18,098 1 426,51025 192 962 293,051

5 84 456 43,139 19 220 1735 196,933

10 106,1787 72,247

32,52827,326

123 123 455 43,5125 60 286 80,514

40 71,73335,433

4 43,45330 96 436 59,38070 70 325 27,377

301 194 1,157 6,117 143,980 523,196 196,933 225,556 43,139 1250 250 1,740 13 250 1,253 44,307 1,800

3 3 59 460 2,221 38,8677 7 51 323 1,974 29,634

12 12 18 334 1,547 22,913294,178

30 30 12 132 587 166,244225,298

13 13 95,39922 22 9 117 600 102,45145 45 37 297 1,338 321,428

749 15 161 821 6,784 1688 96 254 870 10,414 1

296 296 5 296 1,366 95,627500 19 706 3,069 43,707 1325 6 72 360 75,260 1

1,081 52 510 2,479 16,400 1327 91 422 1,605 1,379 1437 51 463 2,094 9,392 1450 78 425 1,984 23,900 1

10 10 18 153 939 48,70528 28 79,483

722

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Page 22 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

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Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

512 23 863 3,769 19,820 1750 13 490 1,625 25,385 1

1,100 19,988 1303 32 803 4,166 19,460 1534 24,723 1161 54 726 3,791 20,383 1882 11 353 1,847 36,689 1

10 10 23 245 1,303 26,78812 12 20 167 428 226,94018 18 4 78 362 79,851

137 137 250 34 137 526 5,000 1 29,052 120 20 97 487 2,332 7,087

487 487 47,775 1316 35 178 763 25,668 1

178 178 33,311 1812 89 551 2,549 6,427 1320 62 211 1,082 4,473 1

10,490 135,137

112 112 150 67 476 2,178 5,000 1 35,236 1340 16 138 615 103,515 1

306 306 100 12 306 2,408 5,000 1 28,672 14 4 23 128 361 32,478

1,812 1,812 4,244 16 6 21,600

350 23,084 1364 13,702

256 11 212 1,048 7,955 1175 8 321 1,695 47,090 1135 9 263 1,807 15,265 1250 6 186 730 5,491 1365 14 257 1,357 5,543 1350 16 267 1,494 20,844 1

4,586 4,222 1,740 12,968 1,420 13,986 66,864 7,087 1,384,872 427,385 44,307 1,800 634,039 29 184,536 6 4,244 1 48,839 95,62725 25 37 297 1,338 793,727

250 250 73 1,050 10,200 45,71413 13 81,021

6 6 71,9758 8 53,5225 5 50,7004 4 55,1884 4 48,797

59404404

12 54 236

1,69236452

1,829404

Page 23 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio-Economic Data

Fam

ilies

cur

rent

ly

usin

g la

nd

fam

ilies

to u

se th

e la

nd a

fter i

t is

clea

red

Fam

ilies

to b

enef

it in

dire

ctly

afte

r lan

d is

cle

ared

If

scho

ol c

lear

ed,

num

ber o

f the

ch

ildre

n

Fem

ale

head

ed

fam

ilies

Tota

l fam

ilies

in th

e vi

llage

Tota

l Vill

age

popu

latio

n

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

sqm

num

ber

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Pagoda

Others (sqm)

Adm. OfficeCanal/Irrigation

Agri. (sqm)

Reset.& Agri. (sqm)

Population

VillageBeneficiaries HealthRoad SchoolPondWellBridge

Reset. (sqm)

Land cleared Use

6 6 49,5437 7 99,831

11 11 68,365308 31 188 903 5,553 1220 11 125 708 3,375 1

339 339 528 164 1,714 13,385 1,291,648 126,735 8,928 23 7 22 120 3,705

207 207 60 265 36 207 1,260 47,408444 444 85 85 444 2,151 28,247

651 654 145 265 128 673 3,531 3,705 75,655

6,815 13,918 56,771 14,482 3,533 46,144 228,228 2,694,808 13,460,044 6,027,792 291,504 7,799 2,771,814 67,058 38,315 3 1,052,473 35 441,158 12 4,244 1 48,839 1,817,710621 3,959 40,464 733 975 15,923 83,166 741,205 5,206,562 2,605,120 282,080 9,717 1,447,949 20,365 24,800 2 97,455 7 269,058 2 853,548

Page 24 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

SOCIO ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT OF MINE CLEARANCE OPERATIONS - PROVISIONAL GUIDELINES ANNEXE II/3

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One SurveyR

eset

tele

men

t La

nd

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69UNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESJAIF F YES 2 4UNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESJAIF F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESJAIF YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESJAIF F YESUNDP F YES 1 1 1 1UNDP F YES 1 1UNDP F YES 1 1

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

Page 25 of 36

Page 119:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

UNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESAUSTCARE F YESAUSTCARE F YESAUSTCARE F YES 2 6UNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP F YESECOSORN F YESECOSORN F YESECOSORN F YES

Authorities ECOSORN F YesAuthorities ECOSORN F YesAuthorities ECOSORN F Yes

ECOSORN F F YesAuthorities ECOSORN F YesAuthorities ECOSORN F YesAuthorities ECOSORN F Yes

3 3 5 11UNDP/AAM F YESUNDP/AAM F YESUNDP/AAM F YESUNDP/AAM F YESUNDP/AAM F YES

Page 26 of 36

Page 120:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

UNDP/AAM F YESUNDP/AAM F YESJAIF F YES 1 1JAIF F YESJAIF F YESUNDP F YES 1 1 1 1UNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP F YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP YESUNDP/AAM F YESUNDP/AAM F YESECOSORN F YESECOSORN F YES

1 1 2 2Grass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root F F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root F F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS F F P P P P P P P P YJMAS P F P P P P P P P P YJMAS F P P P F P F P P P YJMAS F P P P F P F P P P Y

Page 27 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

UNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP P P P P P P P F P P Y 1 2 3 1ECOSORN F F P P F F P P P P YECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN F F P P P P P P F P YECOSORN P P P P P P F P P P Y 5 3ECOSORN P P P P P P F P P P YECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN P P P P P P P F P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P Y 3 2UNDP F F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN F F P P F F F P P P YECOSORN F F P P F F P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP P P P P P P P F P P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P Y 1UNDP P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P Y 12 30 18UNDP P F P P P P P P P P Y 12 30 18Grass Root F F P P P P P P P P YR&D F F P P P P P P P P YR&D F F P P P P P P P P YR&D P F P P P P P P P P YR&D P F P P P P P P P P YR&D F F P P P P P P F P Y 1 3 2R&D P P P P P P P P P P Y 1 3 2R&D F F P P F F F P P P Y 1 3 2

Page 28 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

R&DR&D P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YKOMATSU F F P P P P P P P P YR&D F F P P P P P P F P YR&D F F P P P P P P P P Y 4 4 4 4R&D F F P P F F F P P P YR&D P F P P P P P P P P YR&D P F P P P P P P P P YR&D P F P P P P P P P P YKOMATSU F F P P F F F P P P YKOMATSU F F P P F F F P P P YKOMATSU F F P P F F F P P P YECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P F F F P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDPUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F P P P F P F P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P F F P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P F F F P P P YUNDP F F P P F F F P P P YUNDP

8 6 39 79 43Grass RootGrass Root F P P P F P F P P P YGrass Root F F P P F F F P P P YUNDP/AAM F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP/AAM F F P P P P P P P P Y

Page 29 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

UNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YUNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YUNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YUNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YUNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YUNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YGrass Root F F P P P P P P P P YGrass Root P P P P P P P F P P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P F F F P P P YECOSORN P P P P F F P P P P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YJMASJMASJMASUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP P F P P P P P P P P YUNDPUNDPUNDP P P P P P P P F P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YECOSORN F F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN F F P P P P P P P P YECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YECOSORN F F P P F F P P P P YECOSORNUNDP P P P P P P P F P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDPUNDPECOSORN P F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YGrass Root P F P P P P P P P P YGrass RootGrass RootGrass RootUNDP/AAM F F P P F P F F F F YUNDP F F P P F F F P P P YUNDP/AAM F F P P P P P P P P Y

Page 30 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

UNDP/AAM F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP/AAM F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P F P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P YUNDP F F P P P P P P P P Y

Community USA F Yes 2 2Community USA F F yes 3 3Community USA F F Yes 5 5Community USA F Yes 4 5 1 5 6 1Community USA F YesCommunity USA F Yes 7 1 8Community USA F Yes 2 2Community USA F Yes 1 2 1Community USA F F yes 1 1 5MJP USA p p F Yes 1 1 1Community USA F YesCommunity USA F F Yes 1 1community USA F p Yes 2 2Community USA F F Yes 1 1 1 1Community USA F Yes 3 3 5 2 7 1Community USA F Yes 2 2 4Community USA F Yes 2 1 6 3 5 2 11 8Community USA F Yes 5 3 1 4 8Community USA F F Yes 1 2 1 1 2 1Community USA F Yes 21 2 24 1Community USA F F Yes 3 1 5 1 3 1 5 1Community USA F F Yes 2 2Community USA F F YesCommunity USA F YesCommunity USA F Yes 3 1 4Care USA F Yes 1 1

USA P F YCommunity USA F F Yes 1 1Community USA F F yesCommunity USA F Yes 1 3 2 1 3 2Community USA F F YesCommunity USA F F F F F F YesCommunity USA F YesCommunity USA F YesCommunity USA F Y 5 5 10Community USA F Yes 1 1Community USA F YesCommunity USA F F F F F YesCommunity USA F F F F F Yes

Page 31 of 36

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Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

Community USA F Yes 1 1 1 1 1Community USA F YesCommunity USA F F F F F Yes 1 1Community USA F F F F F Yes 3 3 13 8 4Community USA F F F F F YesCommunity USA F F F F F YesCommunity USA F Yes 1 2 1EURO USA F Yes 1 1 5 4 1 1 6 4Community USA P F Yes 1 1 3 6 4Community USA P P P Yes

24 5 42 23 89 12 122 63Community USA F Yes 1 2 1 1 1 6 4Community USA F Yes 1 1Community USA F Yes 30 6 36Community USA F YesSEILA USA P F YesSEILA USA P F Yes 1 1 1Seila USA P P P F P P Yes 1 2 2 4 2community USA F F Yes 1 1Community USA F Yes 1 1 5Commune USA F F YesCommunity USA F Yes 1 2 1Community USA F Yes 1 2 2Community USA F Yes 4 4Community USA F F Yes 1 1 1 1Community USA F yes 1 1

2 4 3 45 7 60 15Grass Root YGrass Root F YGrass Root F F YGrass Root F F YUNDP YUNDP F YUNDP YUNDP F F YGrass Root F YGrass Root F YGrass Root F YGrass Root F F YGrass Root F F YUNDP F F YUNDP F YUNDP F YUNDP F YUNDP F YUNDP F YUNDP F F Y

Page 32 of 36

Page 126:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

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er

use

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d / B

ridge

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s w

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now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

ECOSORN F F P YECOSORN F F P YECOSORN F F P YECOSORN F F P YECOSORN P F P Y

Grass Root F YUNDP F YUNDP F F YUNDP YGrass Root F YGrass Root F F YECOSORN F F P YECOSORN F F P Y

Germany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany Y

Page 33 of 36

Page 127:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

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re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

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Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

Germany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany YGermany Y

Germany YGermany YGermany YGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermanyGermany

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F Y

JAIF F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F F Y

JAIF F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

JAIF F F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F F Y

JAIF F Y

Page 34 of 36

Page 128:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

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Infr

astr

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re

Bus

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tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

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Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F Y

CMA09 F F YCMA09 F F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F Y

Page 35 of 36

Page 129:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

Annex C to SOP 810

Socio- Economic Impact in Level One Survey

Res

ette

lem

ent

Land

Agr

icul

ture

Lan

d

Past

ure

Land

Fore

st /

Fora

ging

Drin

king

wat

er

Wat

er fo

r oth

er

use

Roa

d / B

ridge

Irrig

atio

n

Oth

er

Infr

astr

uctu

re

Bus

ines

s ac

tiviti

es

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

Min

e

UXO

Unk

now

Cas

ualti

es

Inci

dent

s w

ith

anim

als

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

Donors

Incident & Casualties Information

In the relevant village, will the clearance improve access to… ( if yes put a * F* for full access, a * P * for Partial access ) Is

casualties reduction a reason for clearing

this land ? Y or N

Incidents and casualties during the two previous years (give number)

In the area proposed for clearance In the relevant village

Support

Deve

lopme

nt ag

ency

relat

ed

to the

clea

ranc

e of th

e are

a

CMA09 F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F YCMA09 F Y

UNDP Y 1 3UNDP YUNDP Y

1 3

27 5 50 32 133 13 204 1173 4 4 47 7 60 17

Page 36 of 36

Page 130:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

QR-07D: Survey IWP Operations & Planning Department

Approved: DOP Dated: 29 January 2004 Version: 1 Page 1 of 1

Integrated Work Plan (IWP)

The CMAC’s Operations & Planning Department is implementing the ISO 9001:2000 Quality Management System (QMS). To fulfill the QMS requirements, we need to survey our customer satisfaction on our products/services. Your feedback is valuable for the improvement of our quality management system. We appreciate very much if you could spend your time to complete and return this survey form to CMAC Chief of Secretariat. Please rate (circle) your satisfaction appropriately. Please specify the report your comments refer to: Integrated Work Plan 2009 1. IWP presentation

Not satisfied Very satisfied ☺ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Write any comment here:

2. Do you find all the information you need?

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Write any comment here:

3. Is the language clear and understandable?

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Write any comment here:

4. Your general comments to improve our IWP? _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ (Optional) Name: Position: Organization: Date:

Please cut and pass this paper to Mr. Khun Ratana –CMAC Chief of Secretariat after you completed your writing.

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SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING DONORS AND DEVELOPMENT PARTNERS

Page 132:  · 2019-05-19 · INTEGRATED WORK PLAN 2009 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY FOREWORD 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2. BACKGROUND AND RELEVANT ISSUES 3. 2008

CMAC Building , Duong Ngeap Street, Phoum Kork Chombak, Sangkat Chamchao GaKarsuIm:ak;/ vifIDYg egob/ PUmieKakcMbk;/ sgáat;ecamecA/ x½NÐdegáa Khan Dongkor, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, P.O Box 116, email: [email protected] raCFanIPñMeBj km<úCa/ RbGb;sMbuRt 116/ email: [email protected] Tel: 855-23-995437/8/9, Fax: 855-23-360096, 855-23-367096 TUrs½BÞ³855-23-995437¼8¼9/ TUrsar³855-23-360096/ 855-23-367096 www.cmac.org.kh www.cmac.org.kh