of 22/22
36th International Conference 25-29 August 2018 Crowne Plaza Hotel, Queenstown, New Zealand www.otago.ac.nz/awcbr 2018 Programme and Abstracts

2018 Programme and Abstracts - qmb.org.nz · Programme and Abstracts. 1 3.00-6.00 Öà R ¦®ÝãÙ ã®ÊÄ, CÙÊóÄ P½ þ HÊã ½ 6.00 Öà OÖ Ä®Ä¦ R Öã®ÊÄ, C Ý«

  • View
    4

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of 2018 Programme and Abstracts - qmb.org.nz · Programme and Abstracts. 1 3.00-6.00 Öà R ¦®ÝãÙ...

  • 36thInternational Conference

    25-29 August 2018Crowne Plaza Hotel, Queenstown, New Zealand

    www.otago.ac.nz/awcbr

    2018 Programme and Abstracts

  • 1

    3.00-6.00 R , C P H

    6.00 O R , C B

    7.00 O R

    9.35 PM R : NZ A Cash bar and light refreshments available

    7.15 1. PLENARY LECTURE: C : R E

    Wendy Imlach, Monash University, AustraliaPain pathways - Decoding spinal circuit func on in chronic pain

    2. S M S C : S

    8.00 pm 2.1 Yiwen Zheng, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Can metabolic changes in the blood predict changes in the brain in rats following acous c trauma?

    8.15 pm 2.2 Philip Sanders, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Eff ects of high frequency mul sensory s mula on on early visual evoked poten als in young and elderly adults

    8.30 pm 2.3 Cecilie Topp, Aalborg University, Denmark

    Examining underlying mechanisms of neglect pa ents’ reac on to the Wall method through fl ash visual evoked poten als

    8.45 pm 2.4 Rosie Melchers, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Eff ects of intermi ent theta-burst s mula on on interhemispheric inhibi on throughout stroke recovery

    9.00 pm 2.5 Kathryn Todd, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    The subthalamic nucleus modulates striatal dopamine release from a dis nct popula on of dopamine neurons

    S 25 A

  • 2

    7.30-8.30 L B A

    3. PLENARY LECTURE: C : S S

    8.30 am Juan Canales, University of Tasmania, Australia

    Neurobiology of drug addic on in humans and animal models

    9.15 am Tea/Coff ee break

    S 26 AM S

  • 3

    S 26 A M S

    4. D N S (I) C : P L

    9.30 am 4.1 Dorothy Oorschot, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Synap c triad arrangement within an aversive pathway in the normal uninjured brain

    9.45 am 4.2 Jarred Griffi n, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    ADAMTS4 AAV-gene therapy combined with rehabilita on is therapeu c a er spinal cord injury

    10.00 am 4.3 Steve Seo, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Changes in midbrain dopamine circuitry in the maternal immune ac va on rat model of schizophrenia

    10.15 am 4.4 Shabah Shadli, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Ketamine eff ects on EEG during therapy of treatment-resistant generalized anxiety and social anxiety

    10.30 am 4.5 Gina Forster, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Glucocor coid modula on of accumbal dopamine release is disrupted during amphetamine withdrawal

  • 4

    S 26 A A S

    2.45-3.45 N F D

    Light refreshments available

    3.45-4.15 A T A

    5. C B C : A K

    4.15 pm 5.1 Reece Roberts, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Reassessing the func onal role of fMRI BOLD variability in cogni ve performance

    4.30 pm 5.2 David Moreau, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Structural correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia: Revisi ng common assump ons

    4.45 pm 5.3 Kris na Wiebels, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    The role of loca on details in the construc on of future events

    S 26 A A S

  • 5

    S 26 A

    A S

    S 26 A E S

    6. M -O I C : I K

    5.00 pm 6.1 Marcus Wilson, University of Waikato, New Zealand

    Using neural fi elds to model motor evoked poten als due to transcranial magne c s mula on

    5.04 pm 6.2 Andy Gibson, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Eff ect of background music and dialect varia on on auditory ERPs: Research plan

    5.08 pm 6.3 Catherine Theys, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    The neural basis of stu ering: where and when do diff erences in brain ac va on occur?

    5.12 pm 6.4 Sonja Muller, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Pa erns of brain ac va on during overt speech produc on in adults with persistent developmental stu ering

    5.16 pm 6.5 Petra Mossop, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Neurophysiological correlates of stu ered speech: Crea ng a pipeline for removal of muscle artefacts during overt speech produc on

    5.20 pm 6.6 Alice Freeman, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Inves ga ng the role of lep n in arcuate AgRP neuron development

  • 6

    S 26 A E S

    5.24 pm 6.7 Kris na Aluzaite, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Circadian lights in a hospital se ng to improve sleep, recovery and decrease psychological distress: Study concept and pilot baseline assessment results

    5.28 pm 6.8 Jena Macapagal, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Pericytes can contribute to tumour immune system evasion in glioblastoma mul forme through dampened expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1

    5.32 pm 6.9 Florian Kurth, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Age eff ects on subareas of the amygdala

  • 7

    Conference Dinner

    7.30 pm

    Skyline Restaurant

    Tickets must be purchased in advance.The cket includes return gondola transport to the restaurant.

    The Skyline is a licensed restaurant but wine and beer will be provided.The func on room will be open from 7.00 pm,

    with dinner commencing at 7.30 pm

    Musical entertainment will be provided.

    S 26 A

  • 8

    7.30-9.00 L B A

    9.00 am 7. PLENARY LECTURE:

    C : V D

    Ronald Melki, Paris-Saclay Ins tute of Neurosciences, France

    Prion-like propaga on of alpha-synuclein assemblies in dis nct synucleinopathies

    9.45 am Tea/Coff ee break

    8. S : P ’ D C : V D

    10.00 am 8.1 Victor Dieriks, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Non-neuronal cells enable transmission of α-synuclein in Parkinson’s disease

    10.15 am 8.2 Taylor Stevenson, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Quan fi ca on of non-neuronal cells containing intracellular α-synuclein in the human Parkinson’s disease olfactory bulb

    10.30 am 8.3 Campbell Le Heron, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

    Dis nct eff ects of apathy and dopamine on eff ort-based decision making in Parkinson’s disease

    10.45 am 8.4 Rebekah Blakemore, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Parkinsonian tremor can be diminished by will power

    11.00 am 8.5 Kyla-Louise Horne, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Signifi cant-others underreport the impact of hallucina ons in Parkinson’s disease pa ents with normal cogni on

    M 27 A M S

  • 9

    P S

    9. P S -

    :

    4.00 - 6.00 pm Presenters will be in a endance during this me and posters can be set up from 3.00 pm.

    Presenters for odd number posters will be in a endance from 4.00-5.00 pm Presenters for even number posters will be in a endance from 5.00-6.00 pm Poster board numbers shown in brackets

    9.1 (A1) Adelie Tan, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Characterisa on of classical Hun ngton’s disease neuropathology in a human ssue microarray

    9.2 (A2) Alex Maan, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Resistance to ex nc on following methamphetamine self-administra on in rats

    9.3 (A3) Alice McDouall, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Electrochemical and electrophysiological characterisa on of L-DOPA-derived dopamine in rat brain slices

    9.4 (A4) Amy Alder, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Evalua ng the side eff ect profi le of the G-Protein biased Mu opioid receptor agonists Kurkinorin and Kurkinol

    9.5 (A5) Andrea Gu, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    In vitro wounding models using the Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS)-Zɵ Technology

    9.6 (A6) Ashwini Hariharan, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase defi ciency leads to increased urea levels in the brain

  • 10

    P S

    9.7 (A7) Bede Byers, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Generalisa on of an anxiety process biomarker from speeded response to bimanual fi xed me responding

    9.8 (A8) Benjamin Aus n, University of Queensland, Australia

    A neurocogni ve model to explain the rela onship between occupa onal stress in physicians and adverse pa ent outcomes

    9.9 (A9) Beth Elias, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Autobiographical memory in Parkinson’s disease

    9.10 (A10) Blake Highet, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Presence of gene c disease-specifi c aggregates in the anterior olfactory nucleus of the human olfactory bulb

    9.11 (A11) Bri ney Black, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Receptor studies in the human globus pallidus

    9.12 (A12) Catherine Theys, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Comparison of usability of three AAC systems: EyeLink, eye tracking camera and P300 speller

    9.13 (A13) Chitra Vinnakota, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Extrasynap c Alpha 5 Type GABAA receptors as therapeu c targets For Alzheimer’s disease

    9.14 (A14) Chloe Rayner, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Astrocyte-specifi c GFAP-AAV Vector-mediated secre on of chondroi nase ABC as a poten al therapy following spinal injury

    9.15 (A15) Connor Cleme , University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 acts par ally through the PI3K/Akt pathway to induce pro-infl ammatory phenotypes within the cerebral endothelium

    9.16 (A16) Doreen Hansmann, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Hearing, seeing, and feeling speech: A pilot EEG study

  • 11

    P S

    9.17 (A17) Emma Peterson, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Oddball event-related poten als in Parkinson’s disease pa ents with normal cogni on

    9.18 (A18) Emme Power, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Popula on plas city at the cerebellar Parallel fi bre to Purkinje neuron synapse

    9.19 (A19) Faezeh Tashakori-Sabzevar, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Func onal circuitry of basal forebrain underlying enhanced a en on by reward an cipa on

    9.20 (A20) Farah Khokhar, University of Waikato, New Zealand

    Designing, measuring and modelling a small-scale coil and s mula on circuit for Transcranial Magne c S mula on

    9.21 (A21) Grace Fitzallen, University of Queensland, Australia

    Preterm birth and childhood psychopathology: Linking neonatal neurological altera ons with the preterm behavioural phenotype

    9.22 (A22) Harriet Lawford, University of Queensland, Australia

    U lity of acous c cry characteris cs assessment as a poten al marker of neurological integrity in high-risk infants

    9.23 (A23) Jayarjun Ethiraj, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Age- and gender-specifi c changes of the GABA signalling components in the human hippocampus

    9.24 (A24) Jessy Zhang, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Maternal immune ac va on aff ects hippocampal nNOS immunoreac vity and microglia in postnatal day 35 rat off spring

    9.25 (A25) Joyeeta Roy, University of Otago, New Zealand

    MicroRNA expression in the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease

    9.26 (A26) Julia Newland, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Inves ga ng liposomes for local drug delivery in SCI

  • 12

    P S

    9.27 (A27) Laverne Robilliard, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    The importance of mul -frequency impedance sensing of endothelial barrier forma on using ECIS technology for the genera on of a strong and durable paracellular barrier

    9.28 (A28) Lewis Forrester, University of Otago, New Zealand

    The role of maternal obesity during oligodendrocyte development in the off spring amygdala

    9.29 (A29) Maize Cao, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    The eff ect of AAV mediated knockdown of xylosyltransferase-1 in reac ve astrocytes

    9.30 (A30) Megan Livingstone, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Theory of mind in Parkinson’s disease: A longitudinal follow-up

    9.31 (A31) Meyrick Kidwell, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Reduced HRV in SERT knockout rats: Further transla onal validity as an animal model of depression and anxiety

    9.32 (A32) Micah Austria, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Cerebellar degenera on correlates with motor symptoms in Hun ngton’s disease

    9.33 (A33) Miran Mrkela, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    The eff ect of Tonabersat in reducing chronic infl amma on following spinal cord injury

    9.34 (A34) Nikita Potemkin, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Amyloid-β increases SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell viability

    9.35 (A35) Oluwatobi Eboda, University of Otago, New Zealand

    ATP13A2: Characteriza on of novel human iPS cell models of Parkinson’s and Ba en’s disease

  • 13

    P S

    9.36 (A36) Panzao Yang, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Eff ects of connexin hemichannel blockade on cor cal interneurons a er global cerebral ischaemia in term-equivalent fetal sheep

    9.37 (A37) Petra White, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Valida on of NODDI-MRI for detec on of cor cal brain injury following peripheral infl amma on in neonatal rats

    9.38 (A38) Quenten Highgate, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    A comparison of the eff ects of abs nence on MDMA and cocaine self-administra on in rats

    9.39 (A39) Reza Shoorangiz, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    EEG-based res ng-state func onal connec vity in Parkinson’s disease with normal cogni on

    9.40 (A40) Rhys Livingstone, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Arc protein expression in response to secreted amyloid precursor protein-α in primary hippocampal cultures

    9.41 (A41) Ross van de Wetering, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

    Regional ΔFosB expression associated with chronic MDMA self-administra on

    9.42 (A42) Sanduni Malluwawadu, University of Waikato, New Zealand

    Modelling the spiking behaviour of neurons in human cortex

    9.43 (A43) Ni hiya Siva Subramaniam, University of Adelaide, Australia

    Non-radioac ve isotope labelled breath test for poten al early diagnosis of Hun ngton’s disease

    9.44 (A44) Sivaporn Tasananukorn, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Impaired spa al memory, reduced explora on and increased hippocampal microglia density are associated with senescence but are not reduced by a connexin hemichannel blocker

  • 14

    9.45 (A45) Sophie Mathiesen, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Assessing the effi cacy of adeno-associated viral vectors in targe ng the brain

    9.46 (A46) Susanna Szakats, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Brain development and the Amh locus

    9.47 (A47) Yashna Sagar, University of Queensland, Australia

    Func onal neuroimaging correlates of execu ve func on following preterm birth

    9.48 (A48) Young-Ho Lee, Hanyang University Medical Center, Korea

    Prognos c factors to G-CSF with stem cell therapy for the children with cerebral palsy

    7.00 pm Posters to be removed at this me

    P S

  • 15

    10. O Q R W Venue: Rydges Hotel

    6.00 pm O A

    P S University of Auckland, New Zealand

    6.10 pm O O

    J G Prime Minister’s Chief Science Adviser

    6.25 pm N L

    E B University of California, San Francisco, United States of America

    2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase

    7.30 pm QRW S

    8.00 pm AWCBR S D Venue: Smiths Cra Beer House

    ANS Sponsored Student Quiz

    M 27 A E S

  • 16

    7.30-8.30 L B A

    11. S : T B G H PD: M B H L C : J R

    8.30 am 11.1 Peter Redgrave, University of Sheffi eld, United KingdomParkinson’s disease: Where did all my habits go?

    9.00 am 11.2 Christine Arasaratnam, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Contras ng changes in DARPP-32 and calbindin immunoreac vity in medium spiny neurons in Parkinson’s disease

    9.15 am 11.3 Nico Vautrelle, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Development of a minimally-invasive technology for spa ally- and temporally-controlled drug delivery into the brain

    9.30 am 11.4 Mariana Leriche, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Failure of the habit system in Parkinson’s disease

    9.45 am 11.5 Peter Freestone, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    An optogene c Channelrhodopsin-assisted mapping inves ga on of network organiza on within the subthalamic nucleus

    10.00 am 11.6 Louise Parr-Brownlie, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Anatomical and physiological changes at basal ganglia-motor thalamus synapses in rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    10.30 am ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING All conference par cipants are invited to a end Tea/Coff ee will be available for AGM a endees

    T 28 A M S

  • 17

    3.30-4.00 A T A

    12. D N S (II) C : E S

    4.00 pm 12.1 Chris Shaw, King’s College London, United Kingdom

    ARPP21 muta ons reveal the role of RNA granule dysfunc on in ALS and FTD

    4.20 pm 12.2 Ping Liu, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Altered arginine metabolism in the frontal cortex of pa ents with major depression

    4.35 pm 12.3 Helen Murray, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Mul plex Immunohistochemistry of 10+ markers to assess unfolded protein response ac va on in the Alzheimer’s disease olfactory bulb

    4.50 pm 12.4 Phil Heyward, University of Otago, New Zealand

    Ac vity-dependent ac ons of Li+ in brain network connec vity

    T 28 A A S

  • 18

    13. S : N H - N C : S B

    5.05 pm 13.1 Jacki Henderson, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Development of behavioural self-regula on in preschool-age children prenatally exposed to methadone

    5.20 pm 13.2 Victoria Gill, University of Queensland, Australia

    Confi rmed vs suspected neonatal infec on: associa ons with neonatal neurological abnormali es following preterm birth

    5.35 pm 13.3 Theresa Chin, University of Queensland, Australia

    Characterising the impacts of complex and simple congenital heart defects on execu ve func on

    5.50 pm 13.4 Maddie Pascoe, New Zealand Brain Research Ins tute, New Zealand

    Adults born with very-low-birth-weight demonstrate altera ons in grey ma er volume, perfusion, and White Ma er integrity, and associa ons with birth weight

    T 28 A E S

  • 19

    7.30-8.30 L B A

    14. PLENARY LECTURE: C : J C

    8.30 am 14 Karen Zito, University of California, United States of America

    Sculp ng the nervous system: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of neural circuit refi nement

    9.15 am Tea/Coff ee break

    15. S : D A S D C : J C

    9.30 am 15.1 Anthony Hannan, University of Melbourne, Australia

    Gene-environment interac ons in mouse models of neurodevelopmental and cogni ve disorders

    9.45 am 15.2 Yuk Vyas, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Infl uence of maternal high zinc diet on the development of au sm-associated behaviours

    10.00 am 15.3 Maya Wilde, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Tonotopic mapping in a mouse model of au sm spectrum disorder

    10.15 am 15.4 Rodrigo Suárez, University of Queensland, Australia

    Inves ga ng the development and evolu on of cor cal circuits using in vivo assays in marsupials

    W 29 A M S

  • 20

    16. S : C N C : T D

    10.30 am 16.1 Soroush Safaei, University of Auckland, New Zealand

    Using bond graphs to provide a consistent framework for coupling cerebral circula on with ssue exchange mechanisms

    10.45 am 16.2 Tim David, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Integrated models of neurovascular coupling and BOLD signals

    11.00 am 16.3 Stewart Dowding, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    The Astrocyte-Neuron Lactate Shu le’s role in neurovascular coupling

    11.15 am 16.4 Allanah Kenny, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    Large scale ssue slice simula ons of cor cal spreading depression

    11.30 am C R S P P

    L L A , C P

    Acknowledgements We are deeply indebted to Norma Bartle , Department of Psychology, University of Otago for her help with the conference programme, secretarial assistance, and also Hadyn Youens, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, for help with the abstract submssion. We are very grateful to the Neurological Founda on of New Zealand for its generous fi nancial assistance toward student travel and registra on.

    W 29 A M S

    AWCBR Cover2018AWCBR2018