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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    UNIT 1: Cells and Biomolecules (Biology) (1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    Size can be used to determine the various levels of organization, three of which molecular, cellular and tissue organization. This information is the fundamental to aproper understanding of Biology as the ideas and concepts covered are the basicbuilding blocks from which the rest of the subject is constructed.This unit discusses the structure of cells and organelles and the basic chemistry of acell. t covers the structure of a generalized eukaryotic cells of plants and animal cells aswell as the structure and function of specialized cells of both animal and plant cells. t

    also discussed physical and chemical properties and physiological role of bimolecularsubstances and movement of substances through membrane.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . describe the structure of a prokaryotic cell and its inclusions#

    . describe the structure of eukaryotic cell and understand the roles of the nucleus,nucleolus, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, $olgi apparatus, lysosomes,chloroplasts, mitochondria, ribosomes, centrioles and microtubules, the cellulosecell wall#

    . describe the properties of some important biological molecules# recall,recognise and identify the general formulae and structure of these molecules#understand their roles# and

    %. e&plain how molecules and ions move into and out of cells.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. Structure of cells and organelles ( hours). Basic chemistry of a cell * hours

    Total 1 !ours

    (

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    1./ Structure o0 cells andorganelles

    '.' +rokaryotic cells andeukaryotic cells

    ompare and contrast betweenprokaryotic cells and eukaryoticcells.

    Strategy:-sing a graphic organizerto compare and contrastthe cells.

    '.) $eneralised eukaryoticplant and animal cells

    ompare and contrast betweeneukaryotic plant and animalcells.

    '. ellular components

    '..'. /embrane, cell wall,and cytoplasm

    '..) 0rganelles1ucleus" nucleolus,chromosomes,nucleoplasm, andnuclear membrane#2ough and smoothendoplasmicreticulum#/itochondria,$olgi apparatus,

    3ysosomes#2ibosomes,hloroplasts,entrioles#/icrotubules#/icrofilaments#%acuoles

    4raw the structure of cell walland organelles.

    4escribe the structure andfunctions and distribution of cellwall and organelles.

    http"55cellbio.utmb.edu5cellbio5membrane.html

    Strategy:6&amine prepared slidesunder a light microscopesfor each types of cells andobservable organelles.

    '.7 Specialised plants andspecialised animal cells

    4raw the structure of aspecialised plant and animalcell.

    1ote"Two e&amples of eachspecialized plants and

    animal cells would besufficient.

    8

    http://cellbio.utmb.edu/cellbio/membrane.htmlhttp://cellbio.utmb.edu/cellbio/membrane.htmlhttp://cellbio.utmb.edu/cellbio/membrane.htmlhttp://cellbio.utmb.edu/cellbio/membrane.html
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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    ./ Basic C!emistry o0 aCell

    ).' +hysical and chemicalproperties andphysiological role of

    water

    State the importance of waterproperties as a constituents andmedium for life.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by

    discussion.

    carbohydrate 4raw the basic structures ofcarbohydratesState the different types ofcarbohydrates.

    3ipids 4raw the basic structures oflipids.State the different types of lipids.

    proteins and aminoacids

    4raw the basic structures ofproteins and amino acids.State the different types ofproteins and amino acids.

    ICT" dentify various typesof amino acids frominternet

    nucleic acids 4raw the basic structures ofnucleic acids.State the different types of

    nucleic acids.

    ).) /ovement ofsubstances throughmembrane

    Strategy:3ecture followed bydiscussion.

    +assive transport

    !ctive transport

    '.).

    9

    6ndocytosis6&ocytosis

    4escribe the meanings andprocesses of passive transport,active transport, endocytosisand e&ocytosis.

    ':

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    UNIT : Matter (C!emistry)

    S"N#$SIS

    This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding the basic of matter. The scopeof study encompasses of atomic structure, state of matter and electronic structure ofatoms.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . recognise, recall of specific facts, terminology, principles, and practicaltechni;ues and show the understanding of the concepts of matter and atomicstructure#

    . describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principlesand concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the studyof matter and atomic structure#

    . interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagramsand graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of matter# and

    %. apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to showunderstanding of the responsible use of chemistry in society.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. !tomic Structure < hours). States of /atter < hours. 6lectronic structure of atoms < hours

    Total 1 !ours

    ''

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    '.: !tomicStructure

    '.' Thefundamental

    particles ofatoms

    6&plain the properties of neutronsprotons andelectrons in terms of theirrelative charges and relative masses.

    6&plain the contribution of protons andneutrons to atomic nuclei in terms ofproton number and nucleon number.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the-nderstanding of theory aswell as to apply theknowledge learnt

    '.) 2elative

    /ass

    6&plain the distribution of mass and

    charges within an atom.

    6&plain proton number and nucleonnumber.

    4efine the terms relative atomic, isotopic,molecular, and formula masses based onthe ') scale.

    ICT Integrationnternet =ebsite

    '. /ass Spectrometry

    nterpret mass spectra in terms of relativeabundance of isotopes and molecularfragments.

    alculate relative atomic mass of anelement from the relative abundance of itsisotopes or its mass spectrum.

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics

    Te&tbook

    '.7 /ole and!vogadroonstant

    4efine the term mole in terms of the!vogadro constant.

    alculate the number of moles ofreactants, volumes of gases, volumes ofsolutions, and concentration of solutionsleading to stoichiometric deduction.

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and open

    minded ?onest and accurate in

    the recording of data

    ')

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    ).: States of/atter

    ).' Solid 6&plain ;ualitatively the properties ofsolid in terms of the arrangement ofparticles in three dimensions and therepeated pattern of unit cells.

    6&plain the terms lattice, allotrope,crystal system and unit cell.

    dentify the properties of the seven basiccrystal structures" cube, he&agon,monoclinic, orthorhombic,rhombohedron, tetragon and triclinic withsuitable e&amples. alculations relatingto unit cells are not re;uired.

    6&plain the changes in states of matter,phase diagrams of ?)0 and 0). Theprocesses of vaporisation, boiling,sublimation, freezing, melting and criticalpoints.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as toapply the knowledge learnt

    ICT Integration:

    http"55www.chem.purdue.edu5gchelp5atoms.states.html

    ).) 3i;uid 6&plain the kinetic concept of the li;uidstate.

    4efine the boiling point and freezingpoint of li;uids.

    6&plain the kinetic concept of the li;uidstate.

    6&plain melting, vaporisation and vapourpressure using simple kinetic moleculartheory.

    ICT Integrationnternet =ebsite

    ). $as 6&plain the pressure and behaviour ofideal gas using the kinetic theory.4efine [email protected] law, [email protected] law [email protected] law.-se thepV=nRTe;uation incalculations# including the determinationof the relative molecular mass.

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics

    Te&tbook

    '

    http://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/atoms.states.htmlhttp://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/atoms.states.htmlhttp://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/atoms.states.htmlhttp://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/atoms.states.htmlhttp://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/atoms.states.htmlhttp://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/atoms.states.html
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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    .: 6lectronic Structure of atoms

    6&plain the formation of the spectrum ofatomic hydrogen.

    alculate the ionization energy of anatom from the 3yman series converginglimit.

    2alues:!ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    .' 3inespectra ofatomichydrogen

    4escribe the shape of the sandporbitals.

    4escribe the number and relative

    energies of the s, p, and d orbitals forthe principal ;uantum numbers ', ), and including the 7sorbitals.

    +redict the electronic configuration ofatoms and ions given the proton numberand charge.

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded

    ?onest and accurate inthe recording of data

    .) The fillingof orbitals

    6&plain and use the ?undAs rule and the+auli 6&clusion +rinciple in the filling oforbitals.

    '7

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    UNIT 3: Mec!anics ($!ysics)( 1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit aims to enhance [email protected] knowledge and understanding of basic physical;uantities, international units of measurement, error in measurements, vector and scalar;uantities, the relation between displacement, speed, velocity and acceleration,[email protected] laws of motion, collision and conservation of momentum, e;uilibrium of forcesand effects of frictional forces.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . show the understanding of the basic physical ;uantities, S units, kinematicsincluding uniform circular motionC, dynamics and statics#

    . describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principlesand concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the studyof physical ;uantities, S units, kinematics, dynamics and statics#

    . interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagramsand graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of kinematics,dynamics and statics# and

    %. apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show

    understanding of the responsible use of physics knowledge in society.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. +hysical ;uantities and units 7 hrs). Dinematics hrs. 4ynamics 7 hrs7. Statics 7 hrs

    Total 1 !ours

    '

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE

    '. +hysical ;uantities

    and -nits

    '.' Basic ;uantitiesand S units

    3ist the si& basic ;uantities andwrite their S units.

    4educe units for derived;uantities if the definitions aregiven.

    Strategy:

    3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as toapply the knowledge learnt

    ICT Integration

    nternet =ebsite6g. www.bimp.fr

    '.) 4imension ofphysical ;uantities 3ist dimensions of basic;uantities and determinedimensions of derived;uantities.

    heck and construct e;uationsby using dimension analysis

    '. Scalarsand vectors

    Dnow the operations for thesum of vectorse&amples oncoplanar vectorsC.2esolve a vector to twoperpendicular components.

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics

    Te&tbook

    '.7 6rrors State the differences betweensystematic errors and randomerrors.=rite derived data to anappropriate number of significantfigures.

    'E

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE). Dinematics

    ).' 2ectilinear motion).) /otion with

    constantacceleration

    ). -niform circularmotion andcentripetal

    acceleration

    4efine displacement, speed,velocity, and acceleration.4erive and use e;uations ofmotion with constant acceleration.

    Sketch and use the graphs ofdisplacement9time, velocity9time, and acceleration9time forthe motion of a body.

    4escribe circular motion interms of angulardisplacement, speed, angularvelocity, and period.

    6&plain uniform circularmotion as an accelerationdue to the change in directionof velocity.

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethical

    practices of scientists Thinking critically and

    analytically >le&ible and open

    minded ?onest and accurate in

    the recording of data

    . 4ynamics

    .' 1ewtonAs laws of

    motion

    6&plain what is meant by a bodyhas inertia.

    State 1ewtonAs law of motionand use its formula to solveproblems on motion.

    -se the formulaF = m

    dt

    vd )( or v

    dt

    md )(.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialand practical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as toapply the knowledge

    learnt.

    .) onservation of

    /omentum

    State the principle ofconservation of momentum.

    Show the conservation ofmomentum by means of1ewtonAs law of motion.4istinguish between elasticcollisions and non9elastic

    collisions.4efine impulse as FFdt anddeduce that impulse ise;uivalent to the change ofAmomentum

    ICT Integration

    nternet =ebsite

    '*

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 1

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE

    . 6lastic and non9

    elastic collisions Solve problemsregarding linear collisionsbetween particles.

    T , % Resources: 4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the

    recording of data

    7. Statics

    7.' 6;uilibrium of

    particles

    7.) losed polygon

    7. 6;uilibrium of rigidbodies

    6&plain a couple as apair of forces tending toproduce rotation only.

    To state the conditionsfor e;uilibrium of a rigidbody.

    6&plain how the actionof frictional forces canmaintains a body ine;uilibrium.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorial andpractical sessions to enhance theunderstanding of theory as wellas to apply the knowledge learnt.

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the

    recording of data

    7.7 >rictional forces2ealise that thefrictional force is a forcewhich has a ma&imumvalue of G2.

    '(

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    UNIT : 'aseous E7c!ange8 Trans6ort8 and +omeostasis (Biology)(1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit discussed how raw materials are needed to release the energy, and otheressential substances, are e&changed with the environment and transported within theorganism. n particular, how animals obtain the o&ygen needed to release energy inmitochondria, and how it and other materials are transported by blood around the bodyusing the pumping of the heart. >inally consideration will be given to how a favorablewater balance is maintained in organisms and the methods by which unwanted wastesare removed.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able ble to"

    . recall the structure of the thora

    . describe the mechanism of ventilation, including how breathing is controlled#

    . recall the structure of alveoli and understand their role in gas e&change#

    %. describe the e&ternal and internal structure of a mesophyte leaf#

    %. e&plain the structure and roles of stomata and the mechanism of stomatalopening#

    %. state the functions of the circulatory system in the transport of respiratory gases,metabolites, metabolic wastes and hormones# describe the double circulatory

    system#%. describe the structure of the mammalian heart and coronary circulation and how

    the cardiac cycle is coordinated#

    %. describe the structure and roles of arteries, veins and capillaries#

    H. describe the structure of the vascular tissues# understand the role of vessels inrelation to transport#

    H. e&plain the concept of homeostasis#

    H. describe the regulation of blood glucose level and relate it to diabetes mellitus#and

    H. describe morphological, anatomical and physiological adaptations of plants to

    different environments.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. $aseous e&change 7 hours). Transport < hours. ?omeostasis E hours7. Total 1 !ours

    ):

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    '.: $aseouse&change

    '.' $aseouse&change in

    mammals

    3abel the structures involve ingaseous e&change.

    '.) Breathing cycle 6&plain the role of hemoglobin in

    transporting the gases.4escribe the breathing cycle.

    Strategy"-sing interactivemultimedia software toillustrate the breathingcycle.

    '. Stomata inplants

    4raw labeled structure of stoma.

    Structure andmechanism ofopening andclosing

    4escribe the mechanism basedon starch9sugar hypothesis and DI

    accumulation hypothesis.

    Strategy:3ecture followed bypractical session

    .

    ).: Transport

    ).' !nimals

    ).'.' ardiac cycle State the definition of systole,diastole.

    ).'.) ontrol of heartbeat

    4escribe the cardiac cycle.4escribe the control of heart beat.

    Strategy:-sing interactivemultimedia software toillustrate the cycle.

    ).'. ardiovasculardiseases

    2elate healthy life style to theprevention of cardiovasculardiseases.

    ollect information on thehealthy life styles.

    )'

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    ).) +lants ).).' Hylem and

    ascent of sap4escribe &ylem and ascent of sapincluding transpiration, uptake ofwater and ions by roots, rootpressure and cohesion9tensiontheory.

    Strategy"3ecture4iscussion

    ).).) +hloem andtranslocation

    4escribe phloem andtranslocation based on mass flowhypothesis, and cytoplasmicstreaming hypothesis

    .: ?omeostasis

    .' oncept ofhomeostasis

    6&plain the concept ofhomeostasis.

    4escribe the regulation of bloodglucose level and relate it todiabetes mellitus.

    Strategy"3ecture

    .) 0smoregulation

    in animals

    . 0smoregulationin plants

    3abeled the structure of kidney

    and nephron.

    4escribe the process of urineformation.

    4escribe the role and mechanismof action of antidiuretic hormone.

    4escribe the role of stomata in theregulation of water loss.

    4escribe morphological,

    anatomical and physiologicaladaptations of plants to differentenvironments.

    Strategy:

    -sing an interactive modelto illustrate the process

    ))

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    UNIT 9: C!emical Bonding(C!emistry) (1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of basic chemical bonding.The scope of study encompasses ionic bonding, covalent bonding, metallic bonding andintermolecular forces between molecules.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . recognise, recall of specific facts, terminology, principles, and practicaltechni;ues and show the understanding of the concepts of chemical bonding#

    . describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principlesand concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the studyof chemical bonding#

    . interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagramsand graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the chemical bonding# and

    %. apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to showunderstanding of the responsible use of chemistry in society.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. onic electrovalentC Bonding and covalent bonding < hours

    ). /etallic Bonding < hours

    . ntermolecular forces between molecules < hours

    Total 1 !ours

    )

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    '.: onic6lectrovalentCBonding andovalent Bonding

    6&plain electrovalent andcovalent bonding in terms ofJdot and crossA diagrams.

    6&plain the 3ewis structure ofS:7)9, :)9, 1:9, and 19ions.

    +redict and e&plain the shapeof molecules and ions usingthe principle of electron pairsrepulsion, eg. linear, trigonalplanar, tetrahedral, trigonalbipyramid, octahedral, %9

    shaped, and pyramid.6&plain the concept ofoverlapping and hybridisationof the s andporbitals for the, 1, and 0 atoms in the ?7,,?7, )?), 1?, and ?)0molecules.

    6&plain the differences in thebond angles in the water,ammonia, and methane

    molecules.

    6&plain the e&istence of polarand non9polar bonding inmolecules which contain the 9l, 91, 90, 93i, 9Si bonds,and e&plain the 9covalentproperties of ionic compoundssuch as !l):and 3i.alculations on bond polarity arenot re;uired.

    6&plain the e&istence of co9ordinate bonding ase&emplified by ?:I, 1?7I,!l)lE, and K>e1CEL9 .

    Strategy:

    3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as to applythe knowledge learnt

    ICT Integration nternet=ebsite!chievement orientednitiativennovative

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded ?onest and accurate in

    the recording of data

    ICT Integration:

    http"55en.wikipedia.org5wiki5chemicalMbonding

    )7

    http://en.wikipedia.org/http://en.wikipedia.org/
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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    6&plain typical properties

    associated with electrovalentand covalent bonding.

    6&plain hydrogen bonding, %ander =aalsA forces, and metallicbonding.

    ).: /etallic Bonding 6&plain metallic bondingthrough overlapping of orbitals.6&plain the formation ofconduction and valency bands.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understanding

    of theory as well as to applythe knowledge learnt

    4istinguish betweenconductors, insulators, andsemiconductors Si and $eC interms of conduction band andvalence band.

    ICT Integration nternet=ebsite!chievement orientednitiativennovative

    .: ntermolecularforces betweenmolecules

    4educe the effect ofintermolecular forces betweenmolecules on the physical

    properties of substances.

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    4educe the effect of hydrogenbonding on the physicalproperties of substancesincluding organic substances.

    2alues:

    !ppreciate theethical practices ofscientists

    4educe the types of bondingpresent in substances from thegiven information.

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded

    )

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    UNIT : *a;es and #6tics ($!ysics)(1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit aims to enhance [email protected] knowledge and understanding of wave motion, typesof waves, its propagation, electromagnetic waves and spectrum, geometrical andphysical optics, refraction at curved surfaces, and application of these concepts.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . show the understanding of waves and transfer of energy by waves, two differentforms of waves, the propagation of sound waves and electromagnetic waves,reflection and refraction of light formation of images interference of light#

    . describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principlesand concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study ofwaves and optics#

    . interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagramsand graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of waves and optics#and

    %. apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to showunderstanding of the responsible use of physics knowledge in society.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. =ave motion E hrs). 6lectromagnetic waves ) hrs. $eometrical optics hrs7. +hysical optics 7 hrs

    Total 1 !ours

    )E

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    ).) 6lectromagnetic

    wave spectrum

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE

    .: $eometricaloptics

    .' urved mirrors

    .) 2efraction atcurved

    surfaces

    . Thin lenses

    7.: +hysical optics

    7.' [email protected]

    principle

    Dnow and use the relationship f= r/2 for curved mirrors.

    4raw ray diagrams to showthe formation of images by

    concave mirrors and mirrors.

    4erive and use the formula '5fN'5u I '5v for curved mirrors.

    4erive and use the formulan'5u+ n)5u=n)9 n'C5r, forrefraction at spherical surfaces.

    -se the formula n'5u + n)5u=

    n)9 n'C5r

    to derive thin lensformula

    '5u I '5v N '5f

    and lens makerAs formula

    '5f Nn9'C '5r'I '5r)C.

    -se the thin lens formula and lensmakerAs formula.

    -nderstand and use the?ygensA principle to e&plaininterference and diffractionphenomena.

    6&plain the concept ofcoherence.

    6&plain the concept of opticalpath difference.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialandpractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as to apply

    the knowledge learnt.

    ICT Integration

    nternet =ebsite

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    2alues: !ppreciate the ethical

    practices of scientists Thinking critically and

    analytically >le&ible and open

    minded ?onest and accurate in

    the recording of data

    )(

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    7.) nterference Dnow the conditions forconstructive interference anddestructive interference.

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE

    7. Two9slitinterferencepattern

    7.7 4iffraction atsingle slit

    Dnow PoungAs two9slitinterference pattern.

    4erive and use the formulayN45a for [email protected] interferencepattern.

    Dnow the diffraction pattern fora single slit.

    4erive and use the formula sin= /a for the first minimum inthe diffraction pattern fora single slit.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialandpractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as to apply

    the knowledge learnt.

    ICT Integration

    nternet =ebsite

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethical

    practices of scientists Thinking critically and

    analytically >le&ible and open

    minded ?onest and accurate in

    the recording of data

    )8

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    UNIT

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    Semester

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    '.: /atrices < hoursC

    2ecognize the differenttypes of matrices.

    !djoin and nversematri&es.

    4efine a matri&.

    +erform simple arithmeticoperations on matrices.

    $enerate an !djoinmatri& of dimension & .

    Solving simultaneouse;uations with up to threeunknowns using matrices.

    T , % Resources:

    2eference"Quek Suan $oen, 3engDa /an, Pong +ingDiang. )::7C.Mat!mat"#s $./alaysia" >ederal+ublication.

    eli;ery Strategy:

    ooperative 3earning onte&tual Teaching

    ).: !lgebra < hoursC

    +olynomials -nderstand the meaningof the degrees andcoefficients ofpolynomials.

    arry out elementary

    operations onpolynomials.

    T , % Resources:

    2eference"Quek Suan $oen, 3engDa /an, Pong +ingDiang. )::7C.Mat!mat"#s $.

    /alaysia" >ederal+ublication.

    eli;ery Strategy:

    ooperative 3earning onte&tual Teaching

    '

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    .: Trigonometry < hoursC

    The Trigonometric2atios

    ompound !ngles

    -se and manipulatee&pressions ande;uations involving thetrigonometric ratios.

    Sketch the graphs oftrigonometric ratios.

    6&pand trigonometry ofcompound angles using

    The sine of a sumor difference

    The cosine of asum or difference

    The tangent of asum or difference

    T , % Resources:

    2eference"Quek Suan $oen, 3engDa /an, Pong +ingDiang. )::7C.Mat!mat"#s $./alaysia" >ederal+ublication.

    eli;ery Strategy:

    ooperative 3earning onte&tual Teaching

    )

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER

    UNIT >: $ractical Science 1 (1 credits 53/ !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit will develop [email protected] e&perimental skills and understanding of scientificmethods. t is hoped that through practical works, skills such as handling ofapparatus, planning of e&perimental works, making observations, interpretationof results and making inferences can facilitate the understanding of the dynamicand e&citing nature of science. n the process, an awareness of the ethical,technological and economic aspects of the subject can be created.

    6ach practical work should be accomplished within a hours period inclusive of thereport write up by students under partial supervision of the teacher. The suggestede&periments for +ractical science ' are adopted from that of ST+/ +ractical Biology,hemistry and +hysics. There are e&periments to be carried out in this semester

    comprising of one practical each from Biology, hemistry and +hysics respectivelytaking up a total of : hours.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#MES

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . choose, assemble and use the apparatus correctly#

    . follow instructions and safety procedures prescribed#

    . observe, record and display readings or data collected#

    %. process, analyse and interpret data correctly and perform necessarycalculation#

    %. draw reasonable conclusions consistent with the processed observations# and

    %. use precise language and terminology in preparing the report for the practicalwork.

    $racticals

    Com6onents

    E76eriment Titles

    +racticalScience '

    6&pt 7"

    6&pt

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    UNIT 1/: Re6roduction8 e;elo6ment and 'ro?t!(Biology)( 1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit discussed the strategies that different species have adopted to ensure theirsurvival. These include various types of ase&ual reproduction, with its rapid production ofnumerous but usually identical offspring, and se&ual reproduction often a moreprotracted process yielding fewer offspring, but with the advantage of producing thevariety so essential to a [email protected] evolution and survival in a changing world. ncluded inthis unit are the many types of life cycle which have developed in order to ensure theirsurvival.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able ble to". describe the structure and functions of the principal parts of an insect9pollinated

    dicotyledonous flower and a grass#

    . describe pollination and the events leading to fertilization#

    . understand the adaptations related to insect and wind pollination#

    %. describe and appreciate the significance of the mechanisms for ensuring cross9pollination#

    %. describe the structure and functions of the male and female reproductivesystems#

    %. describe the production of gametes in oogenesis and spermatogenesis#%. recall the roles of luteinising hormone, follicle9stimulating hormone, oestrogen,

    and progesterone#

    %. describe the transfer of male gametes leading to fertilization#

    H. understand the functions of the placenta in relation to the development of thefoetus#

    H. understand the roles of o&ytocin and prolactin#

    H. interpret human growth curves# and

    H. e&plain the meaning of ecdysis and metamorphosis.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. Se&ual and ase&ual reproduction ': hours). 4evelopment and $rowth < hours

    Total 1 !ours

    7

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    1./ Se7ual and ase7ualre6roduction

    '.' Se&ual reproduction inflowering plants

    4escribe the structure andfunctions of the principalparts of an insect9pollinateddicotyledonous flower anda grass.

    4escribe pollination and theevents leading tofertilization.

    -nderstand the adaptationsrelated to insect and windpollination.

    4escribe and appreciatethe significance of themechanisms for ensuringcross9pollination.

    [email protected] followed bypractical session to studythe cross9section ofvarious types of flowers.

    '.) Se&ual reproduction inhuman

    4raw and describe thestructure and functions ofthe male and femalereproductive systems.

    4escribe the production ofgametes in oogenesis andspermatogenesis.

    4escribe the transfer ofmale gametes leading tofertilization.

    Strategy"ollecting information onstructure and its function.

    '. !se&ual reproduction

    +arthenogenesis Sporulation

    Budding Binary fission 2egeneration %egetative

    6&plain using specifice&amples the meaning of

    each type of ase&ualreproduction.

    Strategy:ollecting information on

    e&amples of each types ofin ase&ual reproduction inanimals and plants.

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE).: 4evelopment and

    $rowth

    ).' 6mbryology, humanfetal development andparturition process

    4escribe the formation ofembryo from cleavage toorganogenesis.

    4escribe the functions of theplacenta in relation to thedevelopment of the foetus.

    4escribe the stages ofbirth and lactation, andthe roles of relevanthormone.

    Strategy"-sing video5interactivemultimedia software toillustrate the birth process.

    ).) Seed developmentand germination

    4escribe the developmentof seeds and fruits afterfertilization.

    ompare epigeal andhypogeal germination.

    ). $rowth pattern nterpret growth curves. Strategy:3ecture followed bydiscussion.

    ).7 6cdysis andmetamorphosis

    6&plain the meaning of thetwo concepts.

    4escribe an e&ample of lifecycle .

    E

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    Semester 3

    UNIT 11: CarAon C!emistry I (C!emistry)(1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of the chemistry of carbon.The scope of study encompasses bonding of the carbon atoms, chemical formulae,isomerism and nomenclature and structural formulae for functional group.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of the course the students should be able to"

    . recognise, recall of specific facts, terminology, principles, and practicaltechni;ues and show the understanding of the chemistry of carbon#

    . describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principlesand concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the studyof chemistry of carbon#

    . interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagramsand graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the chemistry of carbon# and

    %. apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to showunderstanding of the responsible use of chemistry in society.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. Bonding of the arbon !toms < hours). /olecular formula, 6mphirical >ormula and Structural >ormula 7 hours. somerism ) hours7. 1omenclature and Structural >ormulae for >unctional $roup 7 hours

    Total 1 !ours

    *

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    '.: Bonding of thearbon!toms

    6&plain the concept ofhybridization in the bonding ofcarbon atoms with referencespecially to carbon atoms whichhave a valency of four and thetypes of hybridization such as thefollowing" sp linear, sp)triangular, sp9 tetrahedral.

    4escribe the formation of R and bonds as e&emplified by

    diagrams of the overlapping oforbitals in ?7, )?7, )?), andE?Emolecules.

    6&plain the concept ofdelocalization of electrons inbenzene rings aromaticallyC.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as toapply the knowledge learnt

    ICT Integration nternet=ebsite!chievement orientednitiative

    nnovative

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics

    Te&tbook

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    ).: /olecularformula,6mphirical>ormula andStructural>ormula

    6&plain the meaning of general,emphirical, molecular, andstructural formulae for organiccompounds.

    alculate emphirical formulae.

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded

    ?onest and accurate inthe recording of data

    .: somerism nterpret structural isomerism withreference to the ability of carbonatoms to link together with eachother in a straight line and5or inbranches.

    (

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    N#*%E'E SI%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'E-$ERIENCE

    6&plain geometric5cis9transisomerism in alkanes in terms ofrestricted rotation due to bond5N bonds.

    6&plain the meaning of a chiralcenter and how such a centregives rise to optical isomerism.

    dentify chiral centres and5or cis9

    trans isomerism in a molecule ofgiven structural formula.

    4etermine the possible isomers foran organic compound of knownmolecular formula.

    Strategy:3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the-nderstanding of theory aswell as to apply theknowledge learnt

    ICT Integration nternet

    =ebsite!chievement orientednitiativennovative

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics

    Te&tbook

    7.: 1omenclature!nd Structural>ormulae for>unctional $roup

    4escribe the classification oforganic compounds by functionalgroups and the nomenclature ofclasses of organic compoundsaccording to the -+! systemof the following classes ofcompounds"aC alkanes, alkenesbC haloalkanescC alcohols including primary, secondary and tertiaryCdC aldehydes and ketoneseC carbo&ylic acids and esters

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded

    ?onest and accurate inthe recording of data

    8

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    UNIT 1: Electricity and Magnetism ($!ysics)

    ( 1 credit 1 !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit aims to enhance [email protected] knowledge and understanding of magneticfields, forces acting on moving charges and current carrying wire, electromagneticinduction, alternating current, transformers, relevant calculations involved in theseconcepts, and electronics.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . show the understanding of magnetic field and flu&, force on current9carryingconductors, 3aws related to electromagnetic induction, alternating current and itsrectification and operational amplifier through their abilities to recognize andrecall specific facts, terminology, principles, and relevant practical techni;uesrelated to the four topics#

    . describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principlesand concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the studyof magnetism, electromagnetic induction, alternating current and electronics#

    . interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagramsand graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of magnetism,electromagnetic induction, alternating current and electronics# and

    %. apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to showunderstanding of the responsible use of physics knowledge in society.

    T#$ICS &N TIME &%%#C&TI#N

    '. /agnetic fields 7 hrs). 6lectromagnetic induction 7 hrs

    . !lternating current < hrs7. 6lectronics ) hrsTotal 1 !ours

    7:

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE'.: /agnetic fields'.' /agnetic field

    '.) >orceon a

    moving charge

    -nderstand the concept ofmagnetic field.4efine magnetic field strength B.-se the formula for force on amoving charge, F = %& x B.

    -se the e;uationF = %&B sin .

    Strategy:

    3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as to applythe knowledge learnt

    '. >orce on acurrent9carryingconductor

    '.7/agneticfields

    due tocurrents

    ).: 6lectromagneticinduction

    ).' /agnetic flu&

    ).) >[email protected] lawand

    [email protected] law

    ). Self9inductance

    ).7Transformer

    -nderstand the magnetic forcethat acts on a straight current9carrying conductor in a uniform

    magnetic field.-se the e;uationF =I'B sin .

    -se the formulae for magneticfields" circular loop, B = I

    2r

    solenoid, B NnI

    straight wire, B NI/2*d.

    4efine magnetic flu&

    N B! cos .State and use >aradayAs law and3enzAs law.

    4erive and use the e;uation forinduced emf in linear conductors,discs, and plane coils.

    6&plain the phenomenon of self9inductance and define self9inductance.-se the formulae

    = -' dI 5dt, 'I= .

    4erive and use the e;uation

    %s5 %+N 1s5 1+ for a transformer.

    4iscuss eddy currents in atransformer.

    ICT Integrationnternet =ebsites

    T , % Resources: 4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded

    ?onest and accurate inthe recording of data

    7'

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    7)

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    SEMESTER 3

    N#*%E'E SI%%STE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN'

    E-$ERIENCE.: !lternating currents

    .' !lternating currentsthrough resistors

    .) +ower

    . 2ectification of

    alternating currents

    7.: 6lectronics

    7.' 0perationalamplifier

    7.) 1egative feedback

    4erive and use the formula forpower in an alternating currentcircuit which consists of a pureresistor, a pure capacitor, and apure inductor separately.

    6&plain half9wave rectificationand full9wave rectification withthe use of diodes.

    -nderstand the operationalamplifier as a differential amplifier.

    4escribe ideal properties of anoperational amplifier.

    -nderstand the principle offeedback in an amplifier

    especially negative feedback.

    Strategy:

    3ecture followed by tutorialsessions+ractical sessions toenhance the understandingof theory as well as to applythe knowledge learnt

    ICT Integration

    nternet =ebsite

    T , % Resources:

    4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

    2alues:

    !ppreciate the ethicalpractices of scientists

    Thinking critically andanalytically

    >le&ible and openminded

    ?onest and accurate inthe recording of data

    SEMESTER 3

    7

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    Foundation Course: Science 1

    Unit 13: $ractical Science 1(1 credits 53/ !ours)

    S"N#$SIS

    This unit will develop [email protected] e&perimental skills and understanding of scientificmethods. t is hoped that through practical works, skills such as handling ofapparatus, planning of e&perimental works, making observations, interpretationof results and making inferences can facilitate the understanding of the dynamicand e&citing nature of science. n the process, an awareness of the ethical,technological and economic aspects of the subject can be created.

    6ach practical work should be accomplished within a hours period inclusive of thereport write up by students under partial supervision of the teacher. The suggestede&periments for +ractical science ' are adopted from that of ST+/ +ractical Biology,hemistry and +hysics. There are e&periments to be carried out in this semestercomprising of one practical each from Biology, hemistry and +hysics respectively

    taking up a total of : hours.

    %E&RNIN' #UTC#MES

    !t the end of this unit the students should be able to"

    . choose, assemble and use the apparatus correctly#

    . follow instructions and safety procedures prescribed#

    . observe, record and display readings or data collected#

    %. process, analyse and interpret data correctly and perform necessarycalculation#

    %. draw reasonable conclusions consistent with the processed observations# and

    %. use precise language and terminology in preparing the report for the practicalwork.

    $racticalsCom6onents

    E76eriment Titles

    +racticalScience '

    6&pt *"

    6&pt ("

    6&pt 8"

    nvestigating the structure of flowers,angiospermatophyta.

    !cid, base and salt9 ionic e;uilibrium.4etermine [email protected] modulus by cantilever method.