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Digital Edition of the 10/19/15 HealthCare Provider

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  • OCTOBER 2015 I HEALTHCAREPROVIDER.COM $4.95

    PROVIDER

    UPSTATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITYS

    DR. DANIELLE LARAQUEARENAHEALTH CARECEO TALK:

    EXCELLENCE IN HEALTH CARE

    AWARDSEVENT SUPPLEMENT INSIDE

    NEW HOSPITAL PLANSMOHAWK VALLEY HEALTH

    SYSTEM OFFERS Q&A WEB PAGE ON NEW HOSPITAL IN UTICA

    THE LISTHEALTHINSURANCE

    PROVIDERS

    A publication for and about health-care providers in CNY

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  • OCTOBER 2015

    NEWS

    EDITOR-IN-CHIEFAdam Rombel

    [email protected]

    ASSOCIATE EDITORMaria J. Carbonaro

    [email protected]

    STAFF WRITERSEric Reinhardt

    [email protected]

    Norman [email protected]

    Nick [email protected]

    CREATIVE DIRECTORErin Zehr

    [email protected]

    RESEARCH DIRECTORVance Marriner

    [email protected]

    SALES

    Mary [email protected]

    Dony [email protected]

    MARKETING BBB Marketing Inc.

    CIRCULATION

    Circulation Management(315) 579-3927

    ADMINISTRATIVE

    PUBLISHERMarny Nesher

    [email protected]

    PUBLISHER EMERITUSNorman Poltenson

    [email protected]

    BUSINESS MANAGERKurt Bramer

    [email protected]

    www.healthcareprovider.com

    Health-Care BRIEFS

    SYRACUSE Upstate Medical University announced that it won UHCs 2015 Sustainability Award in recognition of its ongoing environ-mental-friendly efforts.

    UHC, an organization that represents the nations leading aca-demic medical centers and not-for-profit hospitals, presented Upstate with the award on Oct. 1, at its annual conference in Orlando, Florida.

    UHC honored Upstates commit-ment to sustainability as measured by the following criteria: a dem-onstrated, continuous commit-ment to a sustainability strategy; a quantifiable means of measuring and reporting progress toward and achievement of sustainability goals; and a demonstrated com-mitment to increasing awareness of and communicating about the sustainability program, both among staff/internal stakeholders and throughout the community, according to a news release from Upstate Medical University.

    Upstates history of sustain-ability efforts began when Upstate

    President Gregory Eastwood, M.D. launched the universitys first-ever recycling program through the hospital and academic settings in 1997. Since then, Upstates sustainability program, called Think Green, has expanded to include sustainability education; increase employee, visitor, patient, and student participation; set construction priorities; and obtain community involvement, the re-lease stated.

    In 2008, the Upstates Sustainability Task Force was devel-oped. It launched a series of task force sustainability principles fo-cusing on fossil-fuel consumption,

    its energy and carbon footprint, supply purchases and manage-ment, sustainability participation, energy conservation in construc-tion, and its SUNY partnership. Upstate said it reviews these princi-ples annually to measure progress and launch new initiatives.

    Over the past year, Upstate has introduced new ways to imple-ment green initiatives to surpass its sustainability goals. These projects have included changes at the patients bedside, in the operating rooms, construction processes, ed-ucation and communication, and recycling methods in office spaces, according to the release.

    Upstate Medical wins national award for sustain-ability efforts

    UTICA Lingappa Amernath, M.D., was recently awarded the ICON of Emergency Medicine Award by the Emergency Physicians of India at the PACE International Emergency Medicine Conference.

    Amernath is the medical director for the Emergency Department at the St. Lukes Campus of the Mohawk Valley Health System (MVHS).

    The award honors Amernaths contributions over the past 17 years in promoting, lobbying, developing, and advancing emergency medicine in India. Recently, the Medical Council of India ap-proved emergency medicine as a specialty with 40 residency positions. The National Board of Examinations in India also approved it as a new specialty with 80 emergency-medicine residency positions in India as of 2015. The first group of emergency-medicine residents, which was a col-laborative effort between SUNY Upstate Medical

    University and India, also graduated this summer after a three-year residency training from KIMS, Kerala.

    Amernath has been the appointed American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) ambassador to India for more than four years and is currently the VP of the Global Academy of Emergency Medicine. He served as past president of the American Academy for Emergency Medicine in India and also currently serves as clinical assistant professor at SUNY Upstate Medical University and is the chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine for MVHS at the St. Lukes Campus.

    MVHS Amernath receives ICON of Emergency Medicine Award

    PROVIDER

    2 HEALTHCARE PROVIDER I OCTOBER 2015

    Business JournalNews Network

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  • OCTOBER 2015 I HEALTHCARE PROVIDER 3

    BY ERIC [email protected]

    UTICA Mohawk Valley Health System (MVHS) is providing visitors to its website more details about the decision by its board of directors to build a new hospital at a site in downtown Utica.

    The general area for the construction site is across from the Utica Auditorium be-tween Oriskany and Columbia Streets, Scott Perra, CEO of MVHS, said in a statement

    issued Sept. 22.MVHS on Oct.

    6 launched a New Hospital Q & A page on its website, which includes a series of questions and answers about the new plan.

    The Mohawk Valley Health System is an affiliation of Faxton St. Lukes Healthcare

    (FSLH) and St. Elizabeth Medical Center (SEMC). The two organizations came to-gether in March 2014.

    The new hospital would replace the in-patient services currently provided at the St. Lukes campus of FSLH and at SEMC. MVHS estimates the project will cost be-tween $500 million and $600 million, de-pending on the location, and will take four to six years to complete.

    The New York State Legislature earlier this year approved $300 million in the state budget to help fund a new hospital.

    We recognize that a new hospital down-town can provide a catalyst for the revital-ization of the city of Utica and the entire Mohawk Valley. We look forward to work-ing with our governmental partners and local business and community leaders on moving this option forward. Throughout the planning and implementation of this new building, it is critical that MVHS continue to be financially sound and able to provide quality medical care for the entire commu-nity, Perra said in the statement.

    The MVHS board had also considered building on the St. Lukes campus of Faxton St. Lukes Healthcare, which it said would remain an option for construction if the downtown site proves not to be financially

    viable, according to the Sept. 22 statement.

    Size, costsMVHS indicated on the Q&A web page

    that it will build the new hospital on a 17-acre site with an additional 17 acres surrounding the new facility on which it could add parking garages or medical-office buildings.

    Development of the 34 acres may not happen at one time but it is important to be future-focused on the expansion needs of the organization, according to the web page.

    MVHS currently figures the new hos-pital will have 420 inpatient beds. It also estimates a 900,000-square-foot structure, about twice the size of the hospital at the St. Lukes campus of FSLH.

    MVHS will develop a transition plan for the current buildings. It doesnt plan to move all services to the new hospital. It will most likely use one or more of the current locations for support services that arent necessary at the main campus.

    The state grant only covers a por-tion of the cost to build the new hospi-tal, MVHS said.

    The organization still needs to finance the project through additional grants, loans, and commu-nity donations.

    Gifting support from the community will be vital to the completion of the new hospital, ac-cording to the web page.

    Decision to buildThe organization also used the Q&A web

    page to provide an explanation of what led to the decision to build a new hospital.

    After FSLH and SEMC affiliated in 2014, they focused on consolidating exist-ing resources, eliminating redundancies, expanding the depth and breadth of ser-vices, improving access, and elevating the quality of the regions health-care

    services.Citing the age and physical limitations

    of its existing facilities, MVHSs decision to consolidate the two inpatient campuses to a single facility represents the logical progression of its efforts.

    Several factors spurred the decision.They include the need to build a facility

    with the newest technology, services and advancements in patient safety and quality so that MVHS can deliver the most up-to- date health-care services.

    The organization also cites a growing demand for health-care services with the regions aging population.

    MVHS also wants to operate a facility with greater operational efficiencies to reduce the rate of increase in health-care spending, so the organization can pursue improved financial stability.

    Choosing the siteMVHS also addressed the process it used

    to choose the downtown site for building the new hospital.

    The board worked with Mohawk Valley EDGE; Saratoga Springsbased Elan Planning, Design & L

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