10.12 - ELL 1 - Lesson Plan

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Lesson plan for final observation.

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<p>10.12.2015 Lesson Plan Talbot Hook</p> <p>Class: </p> <p>ENG/ELL IGrade Level:</p> <p>9th 11th </p> <p>Length of class:</p> <p>1.5 hours</p> <p>LEARNING GOAL/PURPOSE: </p> <p>Students will familiarize themselves with both character motivation and literary conflict in light of two stories they have read in class.</p> <p>LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Note: these are a bit different between the two different ELL I classes, but both have had these learning objectives.</p> <p> I will continue learning about and review motivation in stories, write about motivation in my life, and look at character motivation in Lamb to the Slaughter. I will take notes on conflict, look at examples of conflict with other students, and then search for conflict in two stories I have read.</p> <p>STANDARDS:(Per Easts ELL I Curriculum)</p> <p> Cite textual evidence to support inferences drawn from the text. Recognize or recall specific vocabulary such as: Cite, inference, textual evidence</p> <p>RESOURCES/MATERIALS NEEDED:</p> <p>Computer, powerpoint, two stories from class (Lamb to the Slaughter; Little Red Riding Hood), student notebooks and writing utensils, student free-reading books, and differentiated graphic organizers for note-taking and group questions.</p> <p>PLAN for LEARNING (How will you organize student learning in this lesson? </p> <p>LESSON SEQUENCE &amp; PACING:</p> <p>1. 10 minutes of reading, with the prompt: Today, we will make a prediction (a guess) about the end of your story. How do you think it will end?</p> <p>Scaffolding/help/hints: bolded words to draw attention; sample sentence starter for those that need it: I think my story will end . . .</p> <p> Share with a partner, for feedback and community-building. This also helps students iterate their thoughts, at the intimate level of partner-sharing.</p> <p>2. Go over learning targets; students volunteer to read, and teacher explains/clarifies each one, and what we will do with it. These are shared both orally and in writing, and reviewed at the end so that students with different language domain skills can understand our targets for the class period.</p> <p>3. For first block, which is ahead of third, we will begin to review character motivation within Little Red Riding Hood; the third block has barely begun looking at Character Motivation in their other story, Lamb to the Slaughter. Regardless, there are examples of motivation on .ppt slides both in written and visual form (pictures, sentences); students need to make inferences about which type of motivation it is, and then the teacher will ask how they know/why they think what they think. (They have the opportunity to ask their classmates, so there is some additional guidance built-in by nature.) This is a pithy review from last class, which dealt with this topic at a deeper level. Students, in groups, then use reading questions to analyze character motivations within Little Red Riding Hood. (Teacher modeled this process at the end of last class, and students will have an opportunity to learn from their more-capable-peers, and ask individual questions of the teacher and their group mates as they work.)</p> <p>4. Students will then learn about conflict. Teacher will give a brief exposition with heavy use of visuals concerning the different types of conflict, and what each type entails. Students have a guided note sheet, and will take notes. Then, as with the character motivation review, students will be presented with different slides with both written descriptions and visuals asking them to discover what type of conflict is depicted. They will be given time to discuss amongst themselves, before we unpack each one as a class.</p> <p>For more visual support, at the top of each depiction there is a blank space, where the teacher can write in the correct answer, after the class has discussed.</p> <p>5. Before students are given time to look at conflict in their two stories, the teacher will model a sample answer to an example question. Thinking aloud, the teacher will ask students for potential answers, writing a few on the board. Then, the teacher will turn to the text, and find some textual evidence (which was learned at-length before) with which to support one of the student answers. Teacher will write on the board the two requirements for each answer: the type of conflict, and the why, which is backed up by textual evidence. </p> <p>6. Class will review our learning targets, and then write an exit ticket on the two different types of motivation, giving an example of each.</p> <p>Example differentiated graphic organizer:</p> <p>ENG/ELL I Character MotivationName: _________________________</p> <p>Follow along and take notes!</p> <p>_________________ __________________ tells us why people (characters) act or do something. It tells us what a person wants.</p> <p>Character motivation can also be a _________, _________, or ___________.</p> <p>There are two types of motivation.</p> <p>Motivation</p> <p>Motivation</p> <p>A person is motivated by A person is motivated by </p> <p>Example: I want to learn more because I am interested!Example: I want to learn more because I want a good grade!</p> <p>1) Joshua wants to get first place in the race, so his parents will be happy.This is ________________ motivation.</p> <p>2) Maria doesnt want her teacher to yell at her, so she is quiet in class.</p> <p>This is ________________ motivation.</p> <p>3) Hanh loves cooking, and always wants to be better, so she practices every day.This is __________________ motivation.</p> <p>Directions: In the story Lamb to the Slaughter every character has motivations. Mary, her husband, and all the policemen have goals, wants, and desires. Work with your groups and decide why each character did what they did. Use text evidence if you can.</p> <p>Mary:</p> <p>1) Why did Mary sit by the door and wait for her husband? Why did she make him drinks, and want to make him dinner? What type of motivation is this?</p> <p>2) After killing her husband, why did Mary practice talking in the mirror and then go to the grocery store? What type of motivation is this?</p> <p>3) Why did Mary want the police to eat the lamb she cooked? What type of motivation is this?</p> <p> Patrick (her husband):</p> <p>4) Marys husband wanted to tell her he was seeing (dating) another woman. Why would he want to tell her this? Is this extrinsic or intrinsic motivation?</p> <p>Policemen:</p> <p>5) The policemen want to find the person that killed Patrick. Why? What kind of motivation is this?</p> <p>Differentiated for students who need more scaffolding. Multiple choices are listed below, so students need only identify the correct answer instead of writing out the entire thing.</p> <p>Matching Answers: Pick one of these answers for each question, and then find one piece of text evidence to support your answer.</p> <p>1. Why did Mary sit by the door and wait for her husband? Why did she make him drinks, and want to make him dinner? What type of motivation is this?</p> <p>a. Mary was bored, and so she waited for her husband.b. Her husband was coming home to take her out to eat.c. Mary wanted to welcome her husband home, and make him feel comfortable after work.d. Mary had something to tell him.</p> <p>This is ___________________________ motivation.</p> <p>Text Evidence: </p> <p>2. After killing her husband, why did Mary practice talking in the mirror and then go to the grocery store? What type of motivation is this?</p> <p>a. She wanted to calm herself down so she would seem innocent.b. She wanted to make herself look beautiful.c. She was hungry and wanted to eat.d. She just wanted to talk to someone.</p> <p>This is ___________________________ motivation.</p> <p>Text Evidence:</p> <p>3. Why did Mary want the police to eat the lamb she cooked? What type of motivation is this?</p> <p>a. She couldnt eat it all herself.b. She didnt want them to eat it.c. She wanted to make them happy.d. She wanted to get rid of the evidence and the murder weapon.</p> <p>This is ___________________________ motivation.</p> <p>Text Evidence:</p> <p>4. Marys husband wanted to tell her he was seeing (dating) another woman. Why would he want to tell her this? Is this extrinsic or intrinsic motivation?</p> <p>a. He wanted to hurt Mary.b. He felt guilty and wanted to be honest with Mary.c. He didnt mean to tell her.d. Mary made Patrick tell her.</p> <p>This is ___________________________ motivation.</p> <p>Text Evidence:</p> <p>5. The policemen want to find the person that killed Patrick. Why? What kind of motivation is this?</p> <p>a. Patrick was their friend, so they want to find who killed him.b. They are policemen. This is their job.c. The police are bored and want something to do.d. They want to find the person because Mary asks them to.</p> <p>This is ___________________________ motivation.</p> <p>Text Evidence:</p>