03 Sheehan - Introduction -The History of the Redaction of the Encyclopaedia Britannica Article

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    THE HISTORY OF THE REDACTIONOF

    THE ENCYCLOPAEDI A BRITANN ICA ARTICLE

    Introduction

    Draft A (September, 1927)The outline of Draft AGetting Heidegger involvedVarious schedules for meeting at Husserl's home

    Draft B (October 10-22, 1927)Draft B, Section ii-a (before October 10)Heidegger's critique of Draft A (beginning October 10)The "second elaboration" of the Article (up to October 20)The projected outline of the new draftThe order in which the Sections of Draft B were written

    Section ii-bSection iiiSection i

    Heidegger's work on Section iii (October 20-22)

    From Draft B to Draft C (late October 1927)The dialogue of the deafWhat Draft B accomplished

    Draft C (after October 23, 1927)The dating of Draft C

    The title of Draft CThe Introduction to Draft C

    Draft D (November 1927)The dating of Draft DThe writing of Draft D

    Draft E (December 1, 1927 to February [March?] 1928)Christopher V. SalmonA chronology of Draft E

    From Draft E to Draft F (March 1928 to September 1929)The structures of Drafts E and FThe lifespan of Draft F: 1929-1956

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    THE DRAFTS OF THE EB ARTICLE

    IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDERARCHIVAL SIGNATURE: M III 10

    FIRST DRAFT ("A")

    ---- A0 original shorthand text by Husserl: lost---- A00 typed copy of the original shorthand text: lostIII 2 A2 first carbon copy of the typed original: "Freiburg copy"III 1 A1 second carbon copy of the typed original: "Todtnauberg copy"

    SECOND DRAFT ("B")

    B1 typed original: working copy, incomplete.III 3 B2 first carbon copy, complete and clean. Sections i, ii-a, ii-b, iii.

    B3 second carbon copy, "Mekirch copy." Section iii only.

    THIRD DRAFT ("C")

    III 6 C1 typed original: incompleteIII 4 C2 carbon copy; incomplete working copyIII 5 C3 carbon copy; only complete copy of Draft C

    FOURTH DRAFT ("D")

    I 1 D1 complete fourth draftI 2 D2 incomplete carbon copy of D1---- D3 complete carbon copy of D1, sent to Salmon: lost

    SALMON'S ABRIDGED TRANSLATION ("E")

    ---- E1a First draft: typed original: lostII 2 E1b First draft: carbon copy (sent to Husserl)II 1 E2a Second draft, correction of E1: typed (sent to Husserl)---- E2b Copy of E2a, sent toEncyclopaedia Britannica: lost.

    PUBLISHED VERSION ("F")

    ---- F Edited version of E2a, published

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    THE CATALOGED ORDER OF "M III 10" IN THE HUSSERL ARCHIVES

    I

    1 carbon copy pp. 1a, 1b, 10-11, 11a, 11b12-29, 29b, 30-1

    [D1] FOURTHI DRAFT

    2 carbon copy pp. 1, 2, 5-15, 17, 24-29 [D][D2]

    II

    1 Salmon's second draft) pp. 1-13; 17-9; 21-2; i-ii and 1-21

    typed original SALMON'SII [E2a] ABRIDGED

    TRANSLATION2 Salmon's first

    draftpp.1-22 + i-iiand 1-22

    [E]

    carbon copy3

    [E1b]

    III

    1 second carbon: pp. 1-23, plus 5a and 7a[A1] (p. 24-25 are found in E1b] FIRST

    DRAFT2 first carbon:4

    pp. 1-24, plus 5a and 7a[A]

    [A2] (p. 25 = missing)

    typed original: i. pp. 1-11[B1] ii-a pp. 12-14

    -- -- -- missingiii pp. 21-28

    3 first carbon: i. pp. 1-11 SECOND[B2] ii-a pp. 12-14 DRAFT

    ii-b pp. 15-20 [B]iii pp. 21-28

    1Here and in the following draft, p. i is the cover sheet, and p. ii is the introductory paragraph, whereas pp. 1-2 are thebibliography at the end. Concerning the missing pages, seeBriefwechselIV, p. 152 (March 5, 1928, Husserl toHeidegger).

    2Pp. 24-25 of Draft A1 (i.e., the last lines of the German draft plus the two pages of bibliography) are attached to theend of this text.

    3The original is lost.

    4The original is lost.

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    second carbon: -- -- -- non-existent[B3] -- -- -- non-existent

    -- -- -- non-existentiii pp. 21-28

    4 carbon copy: pp. 1a,b,c,d; 1-13, plus 8a; 13a,b;

    [C2] 14-18, 20, 22-25, 28-42,43 (second half), 44-45.

    5 carbon copy: pp. 1a,b,c,d; 1-13, plus 8a; 13a,b; THIRD[C3] 14-45 DRAFT

    [C]

    6 typed original[C1] pp. 1a,b,c,d; 1-2,5-13, plus 8a;

    15-18, 20, 22-25, 28-30,43 (first half)

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    THE HISTORY OF THE REDACTIONOF

    THE ENCYCLOPAEDI A BRITANN ICA ARTICLE

    Thomas Sheehan

    Husserl's writing and redacting of the EB Article extended from early September 1927 through

    at least February of 1928. The present introduction, in the form of aRedaktionsgeschichte, focuses on

    the development of the drafts of the Article, and particularly the first and second drafts. The pioneering

    editorial work of Professor Walter Biemel, published inHu IX, is the indispensable foundation for what

    follows.5 To his work we have added our own close study of the available manuscripts in the light of

    other materials, and we place this research in the appendix following this introduction. It is indispensable

    for understanding the intricate and often puzzling questions pertaining to the chronology of drafts of the

    Article.

    ***

    5Prof. Biemel provides an earlier (1950) and a later (1962) description of the manuscripts of the EBArticle (which are catalogued in the Husserl Archives as M III 10). Only the later description, which isfound inHu IX (1962), pp. 590-591, is correct. The earlier description is almost entirely wrong andshould be discarded. It is found in Walter Biemel, "Husserls Encyclopaedia-Britannica Artikel undHeideggers Anmerkungen dazu," Tijdschrift voor Philosophie, 12 (1950), p. 247-248, n. 1; in ET"Husserl'sEncyclopaedia Britannica Article and Heidegger's Remarks Thereon," trans. P.McCormick and F. Elliston inHusserl: Expositions and Appraisals, p. 303, n. 1. As regards the laterdescription of the manuscripts inHu IX, the following printers errors have been found: (1) p. 590, three

    lines from the bottom: Instead of "264,15" read: "264,1-266,15." (2) p. 591.2: Instead of "Gruppe 1"read "Gruppe 2." (3) p. 591, ten lines from the bottom: Instead of "M III 10 4" read: "M III 10 III 4)."(4) p. 605, re 277.22: Add "Letzte Ausarbeitung" to the title of C2: cf. the same title at p. 591. (5) At p.607.20-21, Biemel attributes a an interlinear remark in C2, p. 6.8 ("seelischer Innerlichkeiten?") toHeidegger, whereas it is virtually certain that Heidegger did not read C2. The words may stem fromIngarden.

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    It is not known exactly when 1927 James Louis Garvin, British editor of theEncyclopaedia

    Britannica, contacted Husserl with an invitation to write the entry "Phenomenology" for the new,

    fourteenth edition.6 No relevant letter has been found in Husserl's papers, and in 1993 the Editorial

    Offices of theEncyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. reported that the company's correspondence with

    Husserl was destroyed after the edition appeared. We do know that in April of 1927 Garvin set

    September of 1929 as the target date for publication the new Britannica (that goal was, in fact, met)

    and that sometime after February of 1928 the final English version of Husserl's Article was completed

    by Christopher V. Salmon. The first recorded mention of the EB Article comes on September 30,

    1927, in Husserl's letter to his friend Paul Jensen of Gttingen:7

    ...I have had to work hard, and perhaps a bit too much, during this vacation period, inthe last instance on another article, entitled "Phenomenology," for theEncyclopaediaBritannica. It also proved to be quite difficult since I was held to a very restrictedlength (equal to about twelve pages of theJahrbuch). But it finally turned out to mysatisfaction.8

    6The thirteen edition of theBritannica had appeared in 1926, but, like the twelfth edition of 1922, itconsisted only of supplements (even if extraordinary ones -- by Trotsky and Einstein, for example) tothe famous eleventh edition brought out by Hugh Chisholm in 1911. Thefourteenth edition wouldremain in print (with revisions) from 1929 until 1974. Thefifteenth edition (1974 to the present;

    designed by Mortimer Adler) carries a new sub-title -- "The NewEncyclopaedia Britannica" -- whichreplaced the subtitle that had been used from 1768 through 1973: "A New Survey of UniversalKnowledge." Beginning in 1928 theBritannica was owned by Sears, Roebuck Co., which was thecompany that paid Husserl for his Article. The fourteen edition of the encyclopaedia was printed inChicago and was published in September 1929 (just weeks before the New York Stock Marketcrashed) at an estimated cost of $2.5 million. See Eugene P. Sheehy, ed., Guide to Reference Books,10th ed., Chicago: American Library Association, 1986, pp. 134-135; and Herman Kogan, The GreatEB, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1958, chapters 17 and 18.

    7The first edition of Karl Schuhmann'sHusserl-Chronik, p. 320, incorrectly indicates that Husserl'searliest mention of the Article dates to a letter of "3.II.27" (i.e., February 3, 1927) written to GustavAlbrecht. I am grateful to Prof. Karl Schuhmann for clarifying (in his letter of

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