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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.2—7-1 Integrating Internet Access with MPLS VPNs Implementing Internet Access as a Separate VPN

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Text of © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.2—7-1 Integrating Internet Access with...

  • Slide 1
  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-1 Integrating Internet Access with MPLS VPNs Implementing Internet Access as a Separate VPN
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-2 Outline Overview Internet Access as a Separate VPN Implementing Redundant Internet Gateway Access Implementing Classical Internet Access for a VPN Customer Implementing Internet Access from Every Customer Site Implementing Wholesale Internet Access Running an Internet Backbone in a VPN Summary
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-3 A provider Internet gateway is connected as a CE router to the MPLS VPN backbone. The Internet gateway does not insert full Internet routing into the Internet VPN. Only the default route and the local (regional) routes are inserted. Every customer site that needs Internet access is assigned to the same Internet VPN as the Internet gateway. Internet Access as a Separate VPN
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-4 Internet Access as a Separate VPN (Cont.) The Internet VPN is isolated from the P routers.
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-5 Example: Configuring the Internet Gateway in a Separate VPN
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-6 The default route should be advertised by all Internet gateways only if they can reach the upstream ISP core. Redundant Internet Access
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-7 Classical Internet Access for a VPN Customer
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-8 Classical Internet Access for a VPN Customer (Cont.)
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-9 Configure Internet VRF for every location. Internet Access from Every Customer Site
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-10 A separate VPN is created for each upstream ISP. Each ISP gateway announces the default route to the VPN. Customers are assigned into the VRF that corresponds to the VPN of the desired upstream ISP. Changing an ISP is as easy as reassigning an interface into a different VRF (and attending to address allocation issues). Wholesale Internet Access
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-11 Benefits: Supports all Internet access service types Can support all customer requirements, including a BGP session with the customer, accomplished through advanced BGP setup Drawbacks: Full Internet routing cannot be carried in the VPN; default routes are needed that can lead to suboptimal routing. Internet gateway routers act as CE routers on the VPN backbone; implementing overlapping Internet and VPN backbones requires care. Limitations of Running an Internet Backbone in a VPN
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-12 Summary MPLS VPN architecture supports defining the Internet as a VPN. Redundant Internet access is easy to achieve. The classical Internet access model can be easily implemented using the Internet VPN. Internet access from every customer site can be implemented by configuring the Internet VRF on a second interface at every location Wholesale Internet access can be implemented by creating a separate VPN for every upstream ISP. Internet VPNs supports all customer requirements, including full Internet routing.
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  • 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. MPLS v2.27-13