© 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. USB Tokens The Reader-less Smart Card Bill Bialick SPYRUS

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Text of © 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. USB Tokens The Reader-less Smart Card Bill Bialick SPYRUS

  • Slide 1
  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. USB Tokens The Reader-less Smart Card Bill Bialick SPYRUS
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 2 USB F The Universal Serial Bus was originally developed in 1995 by a number of leaders in the PC industry including Intel and Microsoft. F The major goal of USB was to define an external expansion bus which makes adding peripherals to a PC as easy as hooking up a "telephone to a wall- jack." The program's driving goals were ease of use and low cost. F Highlights: PC host controller hardware and software Robust connectors and cable assemblies Peripheral friendly master-slave protocols Expansion via multi-port hubs
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 3 Market Forecasts FAccording to market researcher Dataquest (San Jose, Calif.), the microprocessor and memory based smart card market will grow from 544 million units in 1995 to 3.4 billion units by 2001. (Dataquest, 408-468-8206) FA market study released in March 1998 by research firm Dataquest Inc., projected that 100 percent of PC shipments in 2001 will be USB-compatible units, and that the installed base of USB-compatible PCs will exceed 500 million by then. That represents nearly 300 percent growth over the 1998 figure of 136 million USB-equipped PCs, according to Dataquest. FAccording to Andrew Prophet Research and Consulting (http://www.apresearch.com), last year over 4.5 million PCs were shipped with a PC Card slot. In 1999, just three years from now, there will be more than 29 million platforms shipped with PC Card slots, representing 88% of all portable computing devices. Over 20 million cards will ship this year, and over 33 million cards will be shipped in 1997.
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 4 Smart Card FAccording to market researcher Dataquest (San Jose, Calif.), the microprocessor and memory based smart card market will grow from 544 million units in 1995 to 3.4 billion units by 2001. FAccording to the market-research firm Dataquest (San Jose, Calif.), 90 percent of worldwide integrated-chip-card shipments went to Europe in 1995, while only 2 percent headed to the Americas. By the year 2001, Europe is expected to account for only 40 percent of these shipments, while Asia will command 25 percent and the Americas 20 percent. FUntil 2004, ISO 7618 IC smart cards will remain one of several hardware token types used for secure access within enterprises and on bounded extranets (0.8 probability). (Gartner Group 9/17/99)
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 5 USB FA market study released in March 1998 by research firm Dataquest Inc., projected that 100 percent of PC shipments in 2001 will be USB- compatible units, and that the installed base of USB-compatible PCs will exceed 500 million by then. That represents nearly 300 percent growth over the 1998 figure of 136 million USB-equipped PCs, according to Dataquest. In 2002, nearly 400 million PC peripherals supporting the Universal Serial Bus (USB) will represent a market of more than $1 billion, according to market-research company In-Stat. "USB will be the primary connection for human-interface ICs and peripherals," says Scott Hudson, senior analyst for Cahners In-Stat Group's PC Technology Service. "Because you can integrate USB technology into microcontrollers and other ICs, new competition with potential market shift will occur."
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 6 USB Pros and Cons FPros No IRQ or memory window constraints Supports up to 127 devices Faster l USB 1.1 (12 Mbits/s) l USB 2.0 (480 Mbits/s) Parallel and Serial devices being removed from newer notebooks FCons No Microsoft support for Windows NT Very limited support for Windows 95 Connectors are often on the back of the PC
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 7 The Need for Speed Serial port: 115kbits/s (.115Mbits/s) Standard parallel port: 115kBYTES/s (.115MBYTES/s) USB 1.1: 12Mbits/s (1.5MBYTES/s) ECP/EPP parallel port: 3MBYTES/s IDE: 3.3-16.7MBYTES/s SCSI-1: 5MBYTES/s SCSI-2 (Fast SCSI, Fast Narrow SCSI): 10MBYTES/s Fast Wide SCSI (Wide SCSI): 20MBYTES/s Ultra SCSI (SCSI-3, Fast-20, Ultra Narrow): 20MBYTES/s UltraIDE: 33MBYTES/s Wide Ultra SCSI (Fast Wide 20): 40MBYTES/s Ultra2 SCSI: 40MBYTES/s IEEE-1394: 100-400Mbits/s (12.5--50MBYTES/s) USB 2.0: 480Mbits/s Wide Ultra2 SCSI: 80MBYTES/s Ultra3 SCSI: 80MBYTES/s Wide Ultra3 SCSI: 160MBYTES/s FC-AL Fiber Channel: 100-400MBYTES/s
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 8 USB Crypto Tokens FNew type of USB device Hybrid of smart card and USB device Direct connect l USB devices are typically connected via a cable l Board mounted USB connectors are not USB certified yet l Often requires an A-to-A extension cable Not approved by USB organization
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 9 Example Device: Rosetta USB USB 1.1 interface Internal LED for visual status Sturdy key-ring holeFIPS 140-1 Level 3 Design
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 10 Drive for USB Tokens FLower deployment costs No reader required Easier install FMore functionality possible than smart card FDurability l More rugged if unit encapsulated
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 11 Rosetta USB Features FUses same SPYCOS chip as Rosetta Smart Card High Assurance l FIPS 140-1 Certified Algorithm Agile l RSA, DSA, DES, 3DES, etc. Standards Support
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 12 High Assurance FFIPS 140-1 Level 2 Certified FITSEC E4 High certified processor FDPA Resistant Prevents exploitation of private keys through timing or power analysis NSA tested SPYCOS chip for 6 weeks
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 13 FMiddleware is necessary to provide the glue between an application and the token PKCS#11 Support l Netscape Browser and Mail CSP Support l IE 5, Outlook 98+, l Win 2000 Smart Card Logon Plug and Play? SPEX/ Library PKCS#11CSP SWF APPLICATION
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  • 2001 SPYRUS, Inc. 14 Summary FUSB Security Tokens Offer: High Assurance l FIPS 140-1 l ITSEC l Common Criteria Lower Deployment Costs More Durable Interoperable
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  • Thank You 2001 SPYRUS, Inc.