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Frank Owen Gehry

Frank Owen Gehry

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  • Frank Owen Gehry

  • BIOGRAPHYFRANK GEHRY WAS born in Toronto, Canada, in 1929At the age of 17, he moved with his family to Los Angeles, California and studied architecture at the University of Southern California.Later, he studied city Planning at Harvard University. He established his own firm in 1962 in Los Angeles.

    MAGGIES CENTRE, DUNDEE, SCOTLAND VITRA DESIGN MUSEUM, WEIL EM RHEIM, GERMANY

  • BIOGRAPHYSince that time, he has designed public and private buildings in America, Japan and Europe.Gehrys work has earned him several of the most significant awards in the architectural field. Including the Pritzker Architectural Prize.

    The dancing house, Prague, Czech republicGehry tower, Hanover, Germany

  • DESIGN STYLE"Every building is by its very nature a sculpture. You can't help it. Sculpture is a three-dimensional object and so is a building.Frank O. Gehry

    I approach each building as a sculptural object, a spatial container, a space with light and air, a response to context and appropriateness of feeling and spirit. To this container, this sculpture, the user begins his baggage, his program, and interacts with it to accommodate his needs. If he cant do that, Ive failed.Frank O. Gehry

    In spite of changes in Gehrys design over the years, his approach to a building as a sculpture retains.

  • DESIGN STYLEGehrys architecture has undergone a marked evolution from the plywood and corrugated-metal vernacular of his early works to the distorted but pristine concrete of his later works. However, the works retain a deconstructed aesthetic that fits well with the increasingly disjointed culture to which they belong. Most recently, Gehry has combined sensuous curving forms with complex deconstructive massing, achieving significant new results.

    WORKS

  • THE GEHRY HOUSE

  • The Gehry HouseLocation: Santa Monica, California Date:1978 ConstructionSystem: light wood frame, corrugated metal, chain link

    Photo coutesy: Thomas mayer

  • THE ORIGINAL BUNGLOWBy wrapping the perimeter of the lot with construction materials and leaving the original house as it was, Gehry created a new space between the lots lines and the old house.THE NEWBUNGLOW

    THE ORIGINAL HOUSE WAS A SMALL, TWO STORY COTTAGE COVERED BY SHINGLE.

    Originally a small, typical pink bungalow in a quiet, middle class suburb, Gehry transformed it into an extremely controversial work of art with an appearance of incompleteness. By wrapping the perimeter of the lot with construction materials and leaving the original house as it was, Gehry created a new space between the lots lines and the old house. I will be showing u a series of images which shows the "construction" of the Gehry house. They do not represent the house as it was physically constructed. Step by step layers of materials will be added to the original house to explain how the addition created new spaces. With each additional layer, the house becomes more and more complex.

  • THE CONCRETE LAYER

    Low aqua concrete walls were used to mark the boundary

  • THE CORRUGATED METAL LAYER

    CORRUGATED METAL WAS USED CORRUGATED METAL walls were used TO build NEW SPACES AS KITCHEN AND DINING

  • THE WOODEN LAYER

    Wooden plank walls were build in the back yard

  • LAYER OF FLOOR

    A new roof was added to the additional spaces created

  • LAYER OF CHAIN LINK FENCING

    Chain link fencing was used Chain link fencing was used to enclose the floor added.

  • LAYER OF GLASS

    Glass cubes were placed over the kitchen and dining to throw in light

  • THE EXTERIOR LOOK

  • RELATIONSHIP OF THE NEW AND THE OLD HOUSE

  • THE RELATION IN THE INTERIORS

  • PLANSENTRANCEGROUND FLOOR PLANFIRST FLOOR PLAN

  • kITCHENLiving roomBackyard and swimming pool

  • Guggenheim museum bilbao

  • GUGGENHEIM MUSEUMLocation: BILBAO, SPAIN Date:1997 ConstructionSystem: STEEL FRAME, TITANIUM SHEATHING

    The Basque government commissioned Frank Gehry to design this new museum, affiliated with the Guggenheim Foundation. It was conceived as a means of redeveloping the city of Bilbao. Other projects contributing to this aim have been completed or are in the works, many by other world-famous architects, including the Sondica Airport, city's airport by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, a new Conference and Performing Arts Center, designed by Federico Soriano, the construction of a metropolitan railway and underground transportation system, designed by Sir Norman Foster, and a new pedestrian bridge crossing the river at Uribitarte, also the work of Calatrava.

  • LOCATIONPuente De La Salve Campo Volantin FootbridgeNThe river walk

    On one side it runs down to the waterside of the Nervin River, 16 meters below the level of the rest of the city of Bilbao. One end is pierced through by the huge Puente de La Salve, one of the main access routes into the city.

  • HIGHLIGHTER FOR BILBAO

    The museum was opened as part of a revitalization effort for the city of Bilbao and for the Basque Country. Almost immediately after its opening, the Guggenheim Bilbao became a popular tourist attraction, drawing visitors from around the globe. It was widely credited with "putting Bilbao on the map".

  • THE CONCEPT

    The building, sited as it is in a port town, is intended to resemble a ship. Its brilliantly reflective panels resemble fish scales, echoing the other organic (and, in particular, fish-like) forms that recur commonly in Gehry's designs, as well as the river Nervin upon which the museum sits. They also cause the building to appear to change shape throughout the day when viewed from the street.

  • view from Puente De La Salve

    from the bridge it soars towards you to invite you and to conversate

  • View from Campo Volantin Footbridge

    from the bridge it soars towards you to invite you and to conversate

  • CALM AND UNINTERACTIVE

    as you turn around and enter it, the building looks like a calm and uninteractiveno windows, blank walls... the ones in front clad with stones....n some in titanium at the back...

  • ENTRANCE TO THE BUILDING

    u look at is a billboard saying guggenhiem museum bilbao n a glass facade, but thats not the entrance...there in total 2 entrances to the building the main entrance is through a staircase sanwiched between blank stone clad walls at the north western side. That is the individual enrancethere is a separate group entrance from the front

  • THE ATRIUM

    u enter a good atrium, i personally like it as almost every gallery is connected to it.... visually though. The atrium is the real heart of the museum and one of the most idiosyncratic features of Gehrys design. The atriums remarkable height (55 m) is one and half times that of Frank LLoyd Wrights Guggenheim Museum in NY.

  • SKYLIGHT OVER THE ATRIUM

    which has a sort of metal flower skylight at the top that allows a stream of light to illuminate the warm, inviting space.

  • OTHER SOURCES OF LIGHT IN THE ATRIUM

  • Atrium surrounded by exhibition galleries

    Exhibition galleries are organized on three levels around the central atrium

  • SUSPENDED WALKWAYS CONNECTING GALLERIES

    connected by a system of curving walkways suspended from the roof, glass elevators and stair turrets

  • THE terrace

    From the Atrium, the visitor is given the opportunity to access a terrace covered by a canopy supported by a single stone pillar.

  • GALLERIES

    Ground floor planThird floor plan

    exhibition space is distributed in 19 galleries. Ten having regular shape with stone finish.nine other have irregular shape and have titanium finish. the galleries are among the best galleries.

  • LIGHTING IN GALLERIES

    The galleries takes in light from skylights in the roof. The roof plan looks like elevation and skylights look like windows. These diffused skylights are good for display galleries but on the other hand it gives blank and uninteractive exteerior walls.

  • PARTITIONS IN GALLERIES

    the scale that seems to be lost at some places in the exterior.. came down in the interiors as they use partition walls which also acts as displaysthe artefacts themselves were used to create separate spaces.

  • RECTANGULAR LOFTS UNDER SKYLIGHTS

    there is a rectangular loft.....beneath the skylights...that again is a very good concept for lighting but bad as two galleries get connected...two galleries, with diff displays, on diff floors get messed up...

  • RECTANGULAR LOFTS UNDER SKYLIGHTS

  • The service areasOFFICESPARKING

    the back office n loading unloading bays, service entries are best located...they are on the ground level, a level below the place yo enter at...the plan shows parking under the bridge....between the columns... from here u can send supply directly to the largest gallery...from the side entrance u can take everything to the first floor...n other floors... the office n admin is all hidden which is best part... importance has been given to exhibit spaces.... while they have complete control on all that is coming in....

  • Views of the service areas

  • landscapingSHADES AND TREESLANDSCAPE FURNITURE

    the landscaping.....HARDeverywhere....just water, which was already present....nothing soft n green. no shade.....the reason maybe ....bcoz he wanted his building to be a sculpture. some thing hard.... green would have changed the effect of museum.but if this is a reason then why those 3 trees at the rear end?...there can be another reason for thtthe bences at the rear end are backlesslooks good but not comfortablethose trees may have been planted to shade them..he created a place for people to sit and admire the architecture or see the water..the question is why the rear end only.this could have been done at other places tooso there must be another reason for tht..

  • Water bodies

  • Water bodies

    he is putting water, in which u see reflection, thus giving depth to ur view...to admire a building u have to look at it from a distancethe water provides just the same facility

  • Water bodies

    And that maybe the reason bcoz of which gehry gave seating on the rear end onlyhe wanted u gp around the buildingwant u to get aggressive of the hard landscape and then he provide u with a space to sit, relax and enjoy finallywatching his architecture against bilbaoas a background and water as a fore ground

  • Water bodies

    Originally a small, typical pink bungalow in a quiet, middle class suburb, Gehry transformed it into an extremely controversial work of art with an appearance of incompleteness. By wrapping the perimeter of the lot with construction materials and leaving the original house as it was, Gehry created a new space between the lots lines and the old house. I will be showing u a series of images which shows the "construction" of the Gehry house. They do not represent the house as it was physically constructed. Step by step layers of materials will be added to the original house to explain how the addition created new spaces. With each additional layer, the house becomes more and more complex.

    The Basque government commissioned Frank Gehry to design this new museum, affiliated with the Guggenheim Foundation. It was conceived as a means of redeveloping the city of Bilbao. Other projects contributing to this aim have been completed or are in the works, many by other world-famous architects, including the Sondica Airport, city's airport by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, a new Conference and Performing Arts Center, designed by Federico Soriano, the construction of a metropolitan railway and underground transportation system, designed by Sir Norman Foster, and a new pedestrian bridge crossing the river at Uribitarte, also the work of Calatrava.On one side it runs down to the waterside of the Nervin River, 16 meters below the level of the rest of the city of Bilbao. One end is pierced through by the huge Puente de La Salve, one of the main access routes into the city. The museum was opened as part of a revitalization effort for the city of Bilbao and for the Basque Country. Almost immediately after its opening, the Guggenheim Bilbao became a popular tourist attraction, drawing visitors from around the globe. It was widely credited with "putting Bilbao on the map".The building, sited as it is in a port town, is intended to resemble a ship. Its brilliantly reflective panels resemble fish scales, echoing the other organic (and, in particular, fish-like) forms that recur commonly in Gehry's designs, as well as the river Nervin upon which the museum sits. They also cause the building to appear to change shape throughout the day when viewed from the street.from the bridge it soars towards you to invite you and to conversate from the bridge it soars towards you to invite you and to conversate as you turn around and enter it, the building looks like a calm and uninteractiveno windows, blank walls... the ones in front clad with stones....n some in titanium at the back...u look at is a billboard saying guggenhiem museum bilbao n a glass facade, but thats not the entrance...there in total 2 entrances to the building the main entrance is through a staircase sanwiched between blank stone clad walls at the north western side. That is the individual enrancethere is a separate group entrance from the frontu enter a good atrium, i personally like it as almost every gallery is connected to it.... visually though. The atrium is the real heart of the museum and one of the most idiosyncratic features of Gehrys design. The atriums remarkable height (55 m) is one and half times that of Frank LLoyd Wrights Guggenheim Museum in NY.which has a sort of metal flower skylight at the top that allows a stream of light to illuminate the warm, inviting space. Exhibition galleries are organized on three levels around the central atrium connected by a system of curving walkways suspended from the roof, glass elevators and stair turrets From the Atrium, the visitor is given the opportunity to access a terrace covered by a canopy supported by a single stone pillar. exhibition space is distributed in 19 galleries. Ten having regular shape with stone finish.nine other have irregular shape and have titanium finish. the galleries are among the best galleries.The galleries takes in light from skylights in the roof. The roof plan looks like elevation and skylights look like windows. These diffused skylights are good for display galleries but on the other hand it gives blank and uninteractive exteerior walls.the scale that seems to be lost at some places in the exterior.. came down in the interiors as they use partition walls which also acts as displaysthe artefacts themselves were used to create separate spaces.there is a rectangular loft.....beneath the skylights...that again is a very good concept for lighting but bad as two galleries get connected...two galleries, with diff displays, on diff floors get messed up...the back office n loading unloading bays, service entries are best located...they are on the ground level, a level below the place yo enter at...the plan shows parking under the bridge....between the columns... from here u can send supply directly to the largest gallery...from the side entrance u can take everything to the first floor...n other floors... the office n admin is all hidden which is best part... importance has been given to exhibit spaces.... while they have complete control on all that is coming in....the landscaping.....HARDeverywhere....just water, which was already present....nothing soft n green. no shade.....the reason maybe ....bcoz he wanted his building to be a sculpture. some thing hard.... green would have changed the effect of museum.but if this is a reason then why those 3 trees at the rear end?...there can be another reason for thtthe bences at the rear end are backlesslooks good but not comfortablethose trees may have been planted to shade them..he created a place for people to sit and admire the architecture or see the water..the question is why the rear end only.this could have been done at other places tooso there must be another reason for tht..he is putting water, in which u see reflection, thus giving depth to ur view...to admire a building u have to look at it from a distancethe water provides just the same facilityAnd that maybe the reason bcoz of which gehry gave seating on the rear end onlyhe wanted u gp around the buildingwant u to get aggressive of the hard landscape and then he provide u with a space to sit, relax and enjoy finallywatching his architecture against bilbaoas a background and water as a fore ground