The 2014 Pulitzer Prize photography Winners and Finalists

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  • The 2014 Pulitzer Prize photography Winners and Finalists

  • The 2014 Pulitzer Prize WinnersBreaking News Photography

    Awarded to Tyler Hicks of The New York Times for his compelling pictures that showed skill and bravery in documenting the unfolding terrorist attack at Westgate mall in Kenya.

    FinalistsAlso nominated as finalists in this category wereJohn Tlumacki and David L. RyanofThe Boston Globefor their searing photographs that captured the shock, chaos and heroism after the bloody Boston Marathon bombings; andGoran Tomasevicof Reuters for his sequence of photographs that chronicle two hours of fierce combat on the rebel frontline in Syria's civil war.

  • The 2014 Pulitzer Prize WinnersFeature Photography

    Awarded to Josh Haner of The New York Times for his moving essay on a Boston Marathon bomb blast victim who lost most of both legs and now is painfully rebuilding his life.

    FinalistsAlso nominated as finalists in this category wereLacy Atkinsof theSan Francisco Chroniclefor her revealing portrait of an Oakland school's efforts to help African-American boys avoid neighborhood risks and profit from education; andMichael WilliamsonofThe Washington Postfor his portfolio of pictures exploring the multi-faceted impact of the nations food stamp program on 47 million recipients.

  • The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners

    Breaking News Photography

    Awarded to Tyler Hicks of The New York Times for his compelling pictures that showed skill and bravery in documenting the unfolding terrorist attack at Westgate mall in Kenya.

  • A woman tried to shelter children from gunfire by Somali militants at the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya, in an attack that killed more than 70 people. Tyler Hicks made this photo from a floor above, in an exposed area where the police feared for his safety. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 23, 2013)

  • Plainclothes officers rushed into the mall and Hicks accompanied them, knowing well that many terrorists remained inside and fearing not only guns but explosives around every corner. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 22, 2013)

  • Inside, soldiers searched for militants in stores where Hicks and many other expatriates regularly shopped. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 27, 2013)

  • A fire broke out at the mall as the siege went on for several days. Police cordoned off the mall, frustrating Hicks in his attempt to learn the fates of the hostages inside. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 23, 2013)

  • Victims and witnesses of all colors helped each other outside. Hicks is an experienced combat photographer, but said he had never seen anything like this. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 21, 2013)

  • Frightened bystanders took cover in a nearby forest. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 23, 2013)

  • Police and security officers helped civilians escape. The mall had been criticized for lax security. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 27, 2013)

  • In a hastily abandoned cafe, soldiers and security officers tried to isolate the attackers and herd civilians to safety. They found many bodies in stores. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 21, 2013)

  • Escaping shoppers had to pass shattered windows and bodies. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 21, 2013)

  • Security forces searched floor by floor for the gunmen. Hicks said the photos could be so honest and true because the subjects 'are not focused on you -- they're just doing their jobs.' (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 21, 2013

  • One woman had hidden in an air vent of a sushi restaurant. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 21, 2013)

  • A week after the siege ended, when some shopkeepers were permitted to return, suspicions arose that the Kenyan military had looted the place. Expensive clothing was gone. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 30, 2013)

  • A section of the mall's parking lot crumbled, sending vehicles tumbling into an enormous, smoking pit. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 30, 2013)

  • After the siege came the funerals. Simon Kamau, 4 years old, watched as his 26-year-old mother, a cashier at a supermarket in the mall, was buried. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - October 2, 2013)

  • Family, friends and colleagues of Ruth Njeri Macharia, 27, at her funeral. She worked at a restaurant called Urban Gourmet Burgers. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - September 27, 2013)

  • At a memorial service a month after the massacre, trees were planted in memory of those who were killed and a memorial garden was dedicated. (Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - October 22, 2013)

  • The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners

    Feature Photography

    Awarded to Josh Haner of The New York Times for his moving essay on a Boston Marathon bomb blast victim who lost most of both legs and now is painfully rebuilding his life.

  • Jeff Bauman rests during occupational therapy at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital less than a month after having his lower legs blown off in the first of two pressure cooker bombs that exploded at the Boston Marathon. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 8, 2013)

  • Bauman's eyelashes were scorched in the blast. They had been long and bristly. Now, they were growing back, only slower than he'd liked. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - June 5, 2013)

  • With his strength and balance improving, Bauman no longer needed a slide board (in back of his wheelchair) to move from the chair to his therapy mat at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 7, 2013)

  • His mother, Patty, took time off work as a waitress to attend to him and navigate the paperwork associated with his treatment. She was responsible for getting him to appointments which were scattered across Boston. Here, he is late for an appointment to discuss different prosthetic leg options. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 15,2013)

  • A month after the bombings, Bauman had the sutures removed from what was left of his legs at Boston Medical. Outside, a flag flew at half-staff in honor of the victims. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 15, 2013)

  • Bauman wore netting to keep his bandages in place. In addition to losing much of his legs, he sustained burns on his back and a deep puncture wound in his upper right arm. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 8, 2013)

  • Bauman shares a joke with his girlfriend Erin Hurley at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. He had been at the marathon finish line waiting for her to complete the race when the bombs went off. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 8, 2013)

  • Initially, he could not stand to see his amputated legs, but he gradually grew more comfortable with them. Several days after the sutures came out, he had his first appointment with a prosthetist. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 21, 2013)

  • Hanging out with friends, who were wearing bracelets with the words 'Bauman Strong' on one side and 'April 15, 2013' on the other. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 28, 2013)

  • Bauman and Carlos Arredondo, the bystander who had helped him, were introduced at Fenway Park on May 28 before throwing the ceremonial first pitch for a Boston Red Sox game. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 28, 2013)

  • Shooting at a clay pigeon at a friend's bachelor party.

  • At home, he packed three tablets of the painkiller oxycodone in a baggie before going to a restaurant for his father's 53rd birthday. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 16, 2013)

  • Casts of his thighs were made to build the sockets for his prosthetic legs. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 21, 2013)

  • With his energy returning, Bauman was able to get out of the house more. Long stretches in his wheelchair make him sore, and he cannot go up stairs yet. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 20, 2013)

  • At home in the apartment he shares with his mother in Chelmsford, Mass., Bauman was agitated that she could not find one of his prescriptions. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 10, 2013)

  • Bauman's not-quite-finished prosthetic legs with their size-10.5 sneakers. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 31, 2013)

  • At a final fitting for his prosthetic legs, Bauman walked on his own for the first time since the day of the marathon. His girlfriend Erin, looked at him and said, 'I love that you're standing right now,' before coming around to steady him and kiss him. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 31, 2013)

  • After a long day, Bauman's legs were sore when his girlfriend Erin, arrived. She had recently started doing yoga near his house and was spending most nights sharing his bed at his mother's apartment, living out of her car. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - May 21, 2013)

  • Bauman underwent physical therapy. His left leg was much weaker than his right, which made it more challenging. (Josh Haner, The New York Times - June 26, 2013)

  • Invited by the Boston Bruins to appear before Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals, Bauman stood and took a few steps, accompanied by his outpatient physical therapist, Michelle Kerr. At left, in the cowboy hat, is Carlos Arredondo, a bystander who helped Bauman shortly after the bombs detonated. Jeff did not want to appear, but his mother encouraged him and eventually convinced him, saying, 'this country needs some hope right now.' (Josh Haner, The New York Times - June 24, 2013)

  • The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners

    Finalist Breaking Ne