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Trik Bermain Biiliard

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Manual Book ini cukup lengkap dalam mempelajari cara bermain billiard yang baik bagi pemula.
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  • The Lesson By The Monk Published by Samsara Publishing P.O. Box 365 • Orange, MA 01364 1
  • THE LESSON: Written by The Monk Printed and bound in the United States of America. THE LESSON: Copyright © 2001 by The Monk. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means including information storage and retrieval systems without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer, who may quote brief passages in a review. Second Edition. First Printing. September 2001 Published by: Samsara Publishing Post Office Box 365 Orange, MA 01364. 2
  • 3 Index To Pocket Billiards Excellence Allow the fulfillment to come to you. Resist the temptation to chase your dreams into the world. It may take a little self-discipline, perserverance, and faith in your efforts. Be simple. Be faithful. Do not strain after the skills of the masters. It is sufficient to be quietly alert and aware of them. The skills are here and now. Attend to your inner health and happiness. Be still and quiet, and this material will beckon at your feet. The Monk 101 Program The Monk 101 Program Foreword ...................................................................................... 11 The Ten Commandments ............................................................. 17 Introduction ................................................................................. 19 The Monk Clicks ......................................................................... 21 The Back English System ............................................................ 29 Play To Win .................................................................................. 34 The Gerald Sobask Series ............................................................ 38 SECTION ONE: Basic Strokes and Shots The Four Strokes of Pocket Billiards ........................................... 43 The Punch Stroke......................................................................... 47 Have a Great Follow Stroke ......................................................... 56 Stroke and English ....................................................................... 58 Stroke Determines Track Line ..................................................... 60 Consistent Track Line – 1 ............................................................ 62 Float to the Target ........................................................................ 64 Rely Upon Your Stroke ................................................................ 66 Gently Walk the Ball .................................................................... 67 Float Down .................................................................................. 68 Consistent Track Line – 2 ............................................................ 69 Bunt Shot ..................................................................................... 73
  • Have a Great Draw Stroke ........................................................... 75 The Draw ..................................................................................... 76 The Follow Through Draw ........................................................... 78 The Snap Back Draw ................................................................... 79 Follow Through Draw vs The Snap Back Draw .......................... 80 Snap Back Draw Vs Follow Through Draw ................................. 81 Rail Draw ..................................................................................... 82 Snip Draw .................................................................................... 83 The Snapper ................................................................................. 86 The Bouncer ................................................................................ 87 The Spin Stroke ........................................................................... 88 Spin for Position .......................................................................... 89 Develop Your Stroke .................................................................... 90 A Vital Series ............................................................................... 91 The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” Series ............................................. 94 Corrective Action ....................................................................... 115 Stun Stroke ................................................................................ 116 Stun Variation ............................................................................ 117 Slight Angle Stun Shot .............................................................. 118 Kicking Your Way to the Finals ................................................. 119 The Monk’s Famous 13 Ball Exercise ....................................... 122 Touch No Rails .......................................................................... 124 The Four Ball Exercise .............................................................. 126 Look Familiar? ........................................................................... 127 For Advanced Players Only ....................................................... 128 SECTION TWO: Mastering Shots Punch Time ................................................................................ 135 Force Follow .............................................................................. 137 Enlightenment ............................................................................ 138 Be Free – 1 ................................................................................. 139 Shot Ingredients ......................................................................... 140 Draw and Follow ........................................................................ 141 Different Stance for Different Shot ........................................... 142 Understanding Your Track Line ................................................. 143 The “Slide” Rule ........................................................................ 144 Stroke for Position ..................................................................... 146 Get The Stroke ........................................................................... 147 4
  • Spin Your Way to the Finals ....................................................... 148 The Delicate Touch .................................................................... 149 Stun Forward .............................................................................. 150 Be Committed ............................................................................ 151 Overcut ...................................................................................... 155 The Monk’s Famous 12 Ball Exercise ....................................... 156 Sneaky Strange .......................................................................... 157 Inside the Lines .......................................................................... 159 Take What Is Offered You .......................................................... 160 Four!!!! ...................................................................................... 161 The Power Glide ........................................................................ 162 Sight the Rail ............................................................................. 163 Jacking Up ................................................................................. 164 Skill Level .................................................................................. 165 Master Draw .............................................................................. 166 Kill Shot ..................................................................................... 167 Speed, Slide, Speed .................................................................... 168 Creative Draw ............................................................................ 169 Snappy Position ......................................................................... 170 Two Choices ............................................................................... 171 Bridgework ................................................................................ 172 Don’t Fall Short ......................................................................... 173 Impossible!!! .............................................................................. 174 The Walker ................................................................................. 175 Same Stroke for Different Folks ................................................ 177 +5 Extended ............................................................................... 180 Slow Rollin’ With Speed ............................................................ 181 Spin Softly, Darling ................................................................... 182 Don’t Cross My Path ................................................................. 183 Shock Effect .............................................................................. 184 Attack the Problem .................................................................... 185 Be Particular .............................................................................. 186 Road Kill ................................................................................... 187 Let Nature Take It’s Course ....................................................... 188 5
  • SECTION THREE: A Dynamic Workout Know When ............................................................................... 193 Two Rail Speed .......................................................................... 194 Back and Forth ........................................................................... 195 Nice Touch ................................................................................. 196 The Fearsome Foursome ............................................................ 197 Around The Horn ....................................................................... 198 Inside The Horm ........................................................................ 199 Stay Alert ................................................................................... 200 Get Past The Trouble .................................................................. 201 The Monk’s Famous 14 Ball Exercise ....................................... 202 Embrace The Law of Least Effort ............................................. 203 Four Ball Force Follow .............................................................. 204 The Foursome ............................................................................ 205 Mid-Term Exam ........................................................................ 211 The Three Options ..................................................................... 214 Be Particular .............................................................................. 215 Play To Your Strength ................................................................ 216 A Snap Decision ........................................................................ 217 The First Shot Is The Key .......................................................... 218 I See, Therefore I Win ................................................................ 219 Be Free – 2 ................................................................................. 220 A Spot Check ............................................................................. 221 Speed Control ............................................................................ 222 Having Fun With 2-7-2+1 .......................................................... 223 Knowing Your Lines .................................................................. 224 I Have Just Been Killed ............................................................. 225 Look Familiar? ........................................................................... 226 The Pattern From Hell ............................................................... 227 2-7-2+2 With Purpose ................................................................ 228 2-7-2+3 With Purpose ................................................................ 229 6
  • SECTION FOUR: Strategy Play Smart Choice ............................................................................. 235 Straight Pool Shot ...................................................................... 236 The Grady Crunch ..................................................................... 237 Hide and Go-Seek ...................................................................... 238 Our First Safety ......................................................................... 239 Separation Stress ........................................................................ 240 One Mission At A Time ............................................................. 241 Nudge Me Gently ...................................................................... 242 A Tough Call .............................................................................. 243 Inside One Time ......................................................................... 244 The Pay Off ................................................................................ 245 Double Double = Four Rails ...................................................... 246 SECTION FIVE: Smart Play Be Conservative ......................................................................... 251 Know When To Duck ................................................................. 252 Play The Percentage ................................................................... 253 Play Within Yourself .................................................................. 254 Don’t Gamble ............................................................................ 255 Straight Pooly Safety ................................................................. 256 Safety First ................................................................................. 257 The Last Lesson ......................................................................... 258 The Law Of Giving .................................................................... 260 7
  • This book is dedicated to my daughter Faye Kerr In everything she does, she expresses total faith in all my work. Ever since she rode in the wheel barrel while I gathered firewood, she has been helping her daddy. She is honest and means what she says. Faye single handedly organized The Monk Billiard Academy so that this book is now offered throughout the entire world. I am very proud of this exceptional child. Faye Lynn Miller Kerr has been running our lives for thirty years. 8
  • As you go through this wonderful life you meet certain people who become very important in helping you along the way. I would like to take this time to thank the following friends who have been so generous with their support. Toby Vaughn, who looks through this manuscript with an eagle eye. Ted Harris, my publisher, who has faith in my work. Faith Pace, my sister, who finds a way to pick my up when I am down. Debbie Curtis, who laid out this manuscript with great care. Andy Sujdak, who’s help with “The Monk Clicks” is appreciated. Maria Stanbury, who’s continuous support has always kept me going. Laura Luce, a loyal friend, who keeps me on the straight path. Jeremy Kerr is a mainstay at The Monk Billiard Academy. Penny Gelanis, my wonderful niece. I wouldn’t do anything without her. Richard Chase, who’s studio does a fine job with my audio tapes. Steffie Bennett, my cousin who is working with me on a musical project. Audrey Dimitrive, who has helped me with the interpretation of this book in Russia. Lydia Nenewale, for all her help with my projects in New Zealand/ Bob Henning, who loves everything I do. His favorable reviews help sales. Marcia Mallard, her sharp eye catches any mistakes I make. Marylin Morin, my sister who fights me on every project, but love all that I do. Vitilina Thetslova, a friend I met in Russia who is working on my web site. 9
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  • Foreword At some point in your pocket billiards career you will have to deal with how you approach win­ ning and losing. There will always come a time when you stand at the fork in the road. The Les­ son will prepare you for this moment in your bil­ liards experience. After you master each lesson, you will be skilled in all the challenges that con­ front you. You will automatically know what to do when you step to the table. You will see the run out as it will relate to your past experiences. No longer will you agonize over what to do when faced with a problem. And it will be this clear cut solu­ tion to your problems that will allow you to give one hundred percent to the shot. Not knowing what to do is what causes us to be tentative. And we all know the results of a tentative stroke. We all know what happens when we shoot a shot we are not totally committed to. With The Lesson you will know what to do. You w ill acquire the knowledge to see you through the tough times. With this knowledge you will reach a point in this game where you will be faced with your real thoughts towards winning and losing. It is a great time to face these realities. A time when we offer no excuses for our losses. We will have no shot we cannot make. We will face no decision that leaves us confused. So it will be a reality check on how we view this great art called winning. Winning brings us great joy. We are happy when we win. Winning creates conflict. Those we beat are unhappy with us. Winning brings great rewards. We win money. Our expectations level raises when we win a tournament. Everyone wants to see us do it again. 11
  • Foreword (cont.) Winning brings controversy. Our brain does not like to be caught up in controversy. Our brain will avoid controversy at all cost. As we move through the tournament chart, our brain begins to sabotage our wonderful performance. We find ourselves doing dumb things. How many times have you missed a shot and then turned to your friend and said, “I can make that shot a hundred times?” Have you ever really tried to understand why you missed a shot you can make a hundred times in a row? There is a reason for this let down. It is not by chance. After all, you did miss the shot. You did miss the shot and lost your turn at the table. You did miss the shot and blow the game. There is a reason for that miss cue. A very good reason indeed. If you can understand the reason, and change that reason, you will change your des­ tiny. If you are the type of player who blows games, it would be safe to say that you have some con­ cerns about winning. The high cost of winning is not your biggest desire. You have reservations about the winning experience and therefore you take subtle steps to avoid it. Face that person and change those reasons. It is not hard to do. We have values. Some we move towards and try to acquire and others we move away from and try to avoid. A value is what drives us. If gives us energy. It gives us motivation. If you don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings, you may not want to beat them in a match. So when it comes to beat­ ing that person, you have a conflict. A value of winning, and also, a value of not wanting to hurt the feelings of those you play. You move towards your winning values, and away from hurting oth­ ers. In this experience you cannot give one hun­ dred percent. You will always hold something back. 12
  • Foreword (cont.) You want to move towards something, and you want to move away from something at the same time. Many players are caught up in this contro­ versial web. They are torn between two concepts. They are divided within their minds. There is only one solution to this inner tur­ moil. You must be certain as to what you want to accomplish. For instance, the pain you feel when you hurt another players feelings will always in­ fluence you. You need to change that value. You need to see how much it costs you to worry about another players feelings and change that value. You cannot succeed if you are torn between two val­ ues. There are players who will not gamble or play for money. It is not because the money puts added pressure on them. The money does not cause them to choke. It is simply because they do not want to destroy another human being. They will play a marvelous game when it is for the pure fun of it. But when money is on the line, it changes the na­ ture of the game. It means that they will be taking something away from another person. And in their heart of hearts, they do not want to do that. They find no pleasure in it, therefore they will not al­ low themselves to win the match. They will lose. One value takes precedent over another. Do you see how this works? Once you gain the skills to play this game, you then need to gain the skills to compete with a clear mind, a one tracked mind. You must be clear about what you want to do. You must be certain of your values. And you can do this by focusing on the only thing that really matters in this game. The shot in front of you. Shoot it with the skills you learned in The Lesson. Shoot it with the singleness of purpose 13
  • Foreword (conclusion) you learned from this book. Shoot this shot with the clear intention of pocketing the ball and set­ ting up for your next shot. That is your only value. That is the only motivating energy running through your mind. You are not preoccupied with the re­ sults. You are not concerned with winning or los­ ing . Your focus is on the shot in front of you. One shot at a time. Name the shot. Decide on the stroke, and shoot the shot. You will then move on to the next shot, and then the next and then the next. Since your only focus is on the shot you are shooting, you will not experience the conflict between values. If you are to become a champion in this game, you will need to work out the conflict within your values. Change the ones that hold you back or pro­ hibit you from turning in a fine performance. Re­ member, you can change your destiny if you change your values. It’s time for you to shine in this great game. It’s time for you to experience the victories that should be yours. It is time for you to gain the re­ wards you deserve. Master each lesson and I will look for you in the finals. May all the rolls go your way. 14
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  • 19 There is nothing like taking a lesson at The Monk Billiard Academy. At the MBA you will get the one on one attention you need to make a dra- matic difference in your game. You will be further along in your development than your friends. We take personal pride in our students. The Lesson is the material we master. The cost for the three day program is $700. If you are not able to visit The Monk Billiard Academy you can purchase The Lesson and work your way through this exciting material. The Les- son has taken many years to write. I have taken the time to sit at amateur events to watch match after match so I could identify the problems pool players face in their games. It is estimated that I have personally watched over ten thousand matches being played by developing players just like you. So I understand how to strengthen your game and help you become the player you desire to be. My hands on experience is unmatched by any instructor today. From this experience, I have been able to assemble The Lesson. You can save the seven hundred dollar tuition money and use You Are About To Take “A Lesson”
  • You Are About To Take “A Lesson” this book to improve your game and reach new levels. The Lesson is just $39.95. Once you have The Lesson in your possession, you will want to read it over and over. It will become your personal coach. This is well researched material. Master each lesson and you will be well on your way to a new and exciting game. Look no further. All the mate­ rial you need to improve your game is right here. Be patient and master each exciting Lesson. Your skills will improve and you will be able to execute more shots and win more games. The journey towards pocket billiards excel­ lence is our greatest reward. Harry Chapin once said, “It’s got to be the ‘goin’, not the ‘gettin’ there that’s good.” Let us travel this road together. With The Lesson, The Monk points the way for you. Get The Lesson today and begin your jour­ ney now. Dedication, hard work and a love of the game will take you to the finals. Working on your game is vital to your enjoyment. What you do with your practice habits is how you personally ap­ proach this game, and I applaud you on all your hard work. Join The Monk Billiard Academy fam­ ily of fine players and play the game you always dreamed of. After you begin your journey, feel free to email me with any concerns you have. I will help you all I can. [email protected] www.themonk.com May all the rolls got your way, Sincerely, The Monk 20
  • The Monk Clicks A Special Lesson, Very Important As in any good sighting system, you need to practice until you can sight the cue ball automati­ cally. Pool is a game of instinct, feel, rhythm. You must be able to sense the shot in order to make the shot. We cannot reduce this game down to an in­ tellectual level. It is not about absolutes. But we can master “The Monk Clicks” sighting system so it serves us in those difficult times when the game is on the line and we need to perform. It is far better to focus on the dynamics of the shot than to agonize over the score and the results of what you are about to do. Work on “The Monk Clicks” system until it becomes a natural part of your shooting process. You will be glad you have a spe­ cific purpose with each shot. We begin all shots by sighting straight in. Note the line goes straight through the cue ball and then on through the object ball. If we shoot the shot along this line, we can easily see that it will not send the object ball into the pocket. From the straight in position, we begin the sighting process. 21
  • The Monk Clicks 21 From the center of the object ball, and to the edge, there are four points. We will call them clicks. 1234 With this shot, two clicks to the right will send the object ball to the corner pocket. So we will call this a two clicks shot. We will sight two clicks to the right on the object ball. 2 1 If you draw a line from the cue ball to two clicks to the right of the object ball, you will note that you are not really lined up. You have com­ pleted half of “The Monk Clicks”. Since we are sighting two clicks to the right on the object ball, we must set up to sight our line from two clicks to the left of the cue ball. 22
  • The Monk Clicks 2 Place your right leg (right handed) in this line. You will feel good about how you are set up for this shot. Be sure you feel good about your set up. If we are not set up properly, there is no system that will help us. In order to be a fine player and make all the shots you must be set up and in line with the tar­ get. Let’s look at the next shot. 3 123 Here we set up straight in. We can see that this will not pocket the object. One click will not pocket the object ball. Two clicks will not pocket the object ball. Three clicks will pocket the object ball. 23
  • The Monk Clicks 3 123 Now we move three clicks to the left of the cue ball and observe the line from cue ball to ob­ ject ball. If you have a classic stance, you will plant your right foot in this line and prepare to pocket the ball. If you are a “shoot across your body” player, you will line up your right shoulder with this line and prepare to pocket the ball. The Monk Clicks system will help you when the pressure is on. You will calmly go through your sequence and focus on the dynamics of the shot, rather than allow your mind to be confused by the conditions of the game. Lets look at another situation. When we go through “The Monk Clicks” sequence in this shot we find that it is two clicks to the right. Thought for the day “I work on “The Monk Clicks” until it becomes automatic.” 24
  • The Monk Clicks We need to use one cue tip to the right with low draw in order to play position for the next shot. We are aware that using this stroke will cause our cue ball to be deflected to the left. In fact, based upon our past experience we find that the cue ball deflects one click when we use the draw stroke with low right cue tip position. So we adjust our sighting. Instead of a two click shot, this now be­ comes a three click shot. We go through “The Monk clicks set up and deliver the winning shot. As you can see you will still move two clicks to the left on the cue ball. That line does not change. Sight it up, since you are deflecting to the left one click, add one click and shoot the shot. Thought for the day “I go through the entire sequence on all shots.” 25
  • Notes 26
  • The Monk Clicks You can use “The Monk Clicks” for bank shots as well. I like to use the mirrow system. Deter­ mine if it is one, two, three or four clicks and shoot. I do use a slight outside cue tip position as it helps to reduce the throw effect. I seem to make more shots when I favor slight outside english. If it is possible, I never play position off a bank shot. Most of my bank shots are “makers” or the bank shot itself is the best position play. Good position, with­ out making the ball, is deer tracks. When I moved to the wilderness of the Upper Peninsular of Michigan I was awed by the un­ touched beauty of the place. The Upper Peninsu­ las was wild, free and untamed. On one occasion, I got excited because I saw some fresh deer tracks on the trail. When I returned to town I stopped by the tavern and told one of the locals about all the deer tracks I saw. The old lady scratched her chin and looked at me with a twinkle in her eyes. “I never did find a good recipe for deer tracks.” Good position play, without making the shot is deer tracks. I have never seen anyone run out when they got good position and missed the shot. There are so many times we miss a shot be­ cause we forget to allow for deflection. With “The Monk Clicks” system you will go through the en­ tire sequence on every shot. Remember, we only have one shot. The shot before us is the total mea­ sure of our ability to win this game. Every shot is an important shot. You will hear me say “There are no easy shots in the game.” We should respect each and every challenge this great game offers us and we should go through our pre-shot routine on even the simplest of shots. We are profession­ als. We are Monk Billiard Academy graduates. We are winners. Decide on the shot. How many clicks will it take to pocket this ball? What stroke will you be using? Does the choice of stroke change the clicks? Stand in line with the shot. Lean into the shot. Sight it. Feel it. Shoot it. Collect the money. May you click you way to the finals. 27
  • 28
  • The Back English System A Special Lesson There is a little known secret that the masters of this game use when spinning a cue ball. If you watch some footage of the great players from days gone by, you will see that they use the “Back En­ glish” method to spin the cue ball. When you master this technique, you will reduce the amount of deflection you experience with center hits on the cue ball. The “Back English” system is not for all shots. It is for specific shots. The system is used to pocket the object ball and play position. Try this on the Four Ball Exercise. You will be amazed at the di­ rect line your object ball takes to the pocket. With­ out the “Back English” system, you see the object wobble into the corner pocket. With the “Back English” system you see the object ball race di­ rectly into the pocket. I mastered specific shots for this system and it has helped my game. You should try it on the 2-7-2+1. You will notice a dif­ ference in the way the object ball reacts. Try it with the 2-7-2+3. It is amazing that you can hit center ball and spin the cue ball around the table. Master the “Back English” system for your own personal shots. Find out which shots you can use it on. And then be sure to use it. You will win more games. 29
  • The Back English System You are striking center ball. When the cue tip comes forward towards the center of the cue ball, flick your wrist at the moment of contact and im­ part spin. If you want to spin to your right, flick your wrist to your left, the cue tip swipes across the cue ball to the right, the cue ball moves for­ ward with dramatic right spin. There is no deflec­ tion since you have made contact at the center of the cue ball. The cue ball is a stationary target. It is easy to deliver the “Back English” stroke. You can use the “Back English” on all four strokes. It is not hard to do. The cue ball is sitting there. We are able to put right or left spin on a tennis ball that is mov­ ing towards us at ninety miles per hour. We should be able to master spin on a stationary ball. And we can. We will master the “Back English system and use it for our own personal choice of shots. It is not for all shots. 30
  • The Back English System 1 2 3 Set the cue ball on the spot. Sight to the bottom rail. Send the cue ball to the bottom rail and then back to your cue tip. This is center ball at it’s fin­ est. 1 2 3 Right spin Now strike the cue ball, center, with back english to the right. Send the cue ball to the num­ ber two diamond near the spot from which you began the shot. 31
  • The Back English System 1 2 3 Right spin Try it again. Shoot center ball, with back english to the right, and bring the object ball back to the corner pocket. 1 2 3 Right spin Try it again. Shoot center ball, with back english to the right and bring the object ball to the number three diamond. Work on this until you can deliver the “Back English” and bring the cue ball exactly where you want it to be. Develop your in­ stincts with the shot. Become aware of how much spin you are putting on the cue ball. Get a feel for the shot. 32
  • The Back English System Then try the four ball exercise or the 2-7-2+1. Run off several racks using the “Back English” system. This way you will discover your personal choice of shots. Sometimes I will spend an entire day running racks with the “Back English” sys­ tem and The Monk Clicks. This sharpens my skills and serves me when in a match. Remember, many of the four ball exercise shots are one cue tip outside english, thus the clicks are not totally true. We make adjustments for the outside english. With the “Back English” we do not have to make any adjustment.I have seen some golfers us the “Back English” system in putts of a short distance. A spinning golf ball will not be affected by a spike mark or slight defect in the green, while a rolling golf ball will be thrown off line. We have been spinning balls and spinning our wheels since the beginning of time. May you spin your way to the finals. 33
  • Play To Win A Special Lesson We spend a lot of time mastering these tech­ niques here in The Lesson. This is the material we will need to reach the finals. Once we master these techniques we will then have to turn our attention on the mastery over self. “Though you may mas­ ter a thousand men a thousand times, the greatest warrior is one who masters self.” It is time we sort out how we are going to ap­ proach winning. As we move closer to that ulti­ mate victory, we are bothered by interference. Shots that were easy and routine before suddenly look harder now as we run out the final rack. This interferences comes from our own confusion about winning. For some of us, we are not so certain of our goals. We want to win, but we are not sure we want the responsibility of winning. We are not sure we want to stand in the spot light. We are not sure we want to listen to the jealous rumblings from those we have defeated. We are not sure we want the added pressure winning brings. We are about to tread in unchartered waters and this brings un­ certainty. If you are to stand in the winners circle you must be certain in your choices. You can have no interference running through your mind, for if you do, you will not be able to deliver the crisp pure stroke that winning requires. It is time for you to give up that interference. It is time for you to mas­ ter that greatest of warriors. It is time for you to master self. My book I Came To Win is very clear about this. I also have recorded a dynamic tape for you to listen to over and over. It will lead you to the winners circle many times. If you master the ma­ terial in The Lesson, you should order the tape I Came To Win and learn to master your winning skills. 34
  • Play To Win If you do not want to order this tape, read the following. For this is what the tape is all about. Define what you really want in this game. This gives you a value. A value you are motivated to pursue. A desire that gives you the energy to drive you on. Define what you really want to avoid in this game. This gives you a value. With this value you have the energy to move away from it. You make a conscious effort to avoid this value. We call it a value because it drives you. Anything that moti­ vates you has to be called a value. You must be certain of your values for they direct your life. Not only in the this grand game of pocket billiards, but in all areas of your life. Values drive us on. Let’s take a look at values we want, and val­ ues we don’t want. I Want To Win I don’t want to cause disap­ pointment in others. If you think this is not true, how come you have a hard time playing someone who is not even close to your skill level? I Want To Win I don’t want to raise my level of expectations. How many of you complain when the director gives you a higher rating? I Want To Win I am embarrassed to stand in the spot light. How many of you do not enjoy the attention winning brings? 35
  • Play To Win Do you see the pattern here? We have a con­ flict in our values. One value we are moving to­ wards, the others we are moving away from. As long as we have this conflict, we will never be certain about winning. There will always be an internal struggle in our efforts to win tournaments. Are you tired at the end of a tournament? You are exhausted from fighting this internal conflict. You are not worn out by the grinds of tournament play. Once you resolve this conflict, you can use your energy to move towards your values. You won’t be wasting it on moving away from values. So you need to change your values. Change the destructive values that are ruling your life. Change your values and you change your destiny. Of course the hour long tape covers this sub­ ject in greater detail. It is called I Came To Win and retails for $14.95. As a “Lesson” graduate, you may have this tape for just ten dollars plus two dollars shipping and handling. I want you to master this material. It is very important to our game. I could write a book about it. In fact I did write a book about it. My book, I Came To Win deals with the art of self mastery. You may also order that book. It sells for $19.95 plus $3.00 S&H. There is a companion tape available that deals with meditation. One side helps you identify with the I Came To Win principles. The other side deals with “Be the Master of the game”. If you mention that you are a serious student of The Lesson, I will give you that tape free because I want you to have it. Just call The Monk Billiard Academy: (978-544-7859) 36
  • Play To Win I have provided a series of exercises here in The Lesson so you can accumulate the skills to make the shot and see the proper patterns on the table. There are times when the game itself chal­ lenges us with conditions we need to meet head on in order to enjoy the success we seek. Once we have acquired the knowledge or intellectual cog­ nition we must accumulate this informational foundation into our mind computer. And then move on the intuitive expression of that knowl­ edge. Until we have mastered these “Lesson” tech­ niques, we will not be able to rely upon our in­ stincts where the real game of pocket billiards is played out. We must be able to recognize what it is we want to accomplish, If we have not acquired the knowledge we will be like a little child who knows exactly what she wants to say, but has not yet learned the words. I wish I could say that your mastery of The Lesson would complete your training. But I would be the worst of masters if I were to teach you at the expense of your experience. For it is in the battle itself where we acquire our greatest skills. Begin to move on to the intuitive side of this great game. Learn to compete. Learn to concentrate on the shots at hand. Train yourself to be the best. Thought for the day “When you are ready to measure yourself by the moment, you are ready to meet any goals.” 37
  • The Gerald Sobask Series Many times when I am working with a stu­ dent at The Monk Billiard Academy, a series of shots will come up so we can work on a skill that will help us become the winners we desire. I was working with Gerald Sobask from Connecticut and this lesson came up. It will be great for you to demonstrate the ability to deliver three different strokes to get three different positions on one shot. Place cue ball near the spot. 9 In the first lesson, deliver a nice smooth fol­ low stroke and allow the cue ball to hit the long rail and then come down for position on the nine ball. 38
  • The Gerald Sobask Series 9 In the second lesson, punch the cue ball with some inside english and allow the cue ball to come down for position on the nine ball. 9 In the third lesson, snap draw the cue ball and go two rails for position on the nine ball. This is a good opportunity for you to see where your strength and weaknesses are. If you have trouble, work on it until you are able to succeed with each stroke. You need this ability to survive the diffi­ cult test that will be sure to come in future matches. 39
  • Notes 40
  • 41 Section One Basic Strokes and Shots
  • 42
  • The Four Strokes of Pocket Billards You must understand how you are hitting the cue ball before you can anticipate where the cue ball is going. The way you deliver the stroke determines the outcome of the shot. The “Stroke Determines Track Line” lesson proves that we need to be certain of what stroke we are using if we are to master good position play. The fact that there are four strokes in pocket billiards should come as no surprise. In all sports there are a variety of shots we can use to win games. You can hit a high fade in golf, a low draw, a punch & run, and back spin pitch shot, a plop shot. You do not hit the golf ball the same way for each shot. You use a different swing to get the dif­ ferent results. In bowling, you can use various methods to shatter the pins. In tennis, there are spin shots, back hands, power forwards. In all games, we use different shots to gain the advantage. So it is with pocket billiards. Once you begin to use your stroke to control the cue ball you find that you have far better control of your position play. This is a breakthrough. Decide to dedicate your training to the mas­ tery of each stroke and you will find yourself in the winner circle more often. The Punch Stroke Compare this to a boxers left jab. You are flick­ ing the stroke out to stop the cue ball dead in its tracks. The Follow Stroke In this case, you are rolling the cue ball along the slate to follow the object ball. There is no dramatic spin like you would find in a force follow. The Follow stroke is limp, soft and smooth. The Draw Stroke In this fabulous stroke you are snapping through the cue ball to impart dramatic spin. Actually, there are four distinct draw strokes: – The Follow Through Draw – The Snap Back Draw – The Snip Draw – The Bounce Back Draw 43
  • The Four Strokes of Pocket Billiards (cont.) You will find that you need to execute one draw stroke over the other to win games. The dif­ ference between winning and losing is found in which draw stroke you use. There are Les­ sons in this book to help you master each one. The Spin Stroke This is a throw back to the old days of 14.1 pocket billiards. Once again, the difference between winning and losing comes from your choice of strokes. I have seen situations where The Spin Stroke was the only way to position the cue ball for the winning shot. It is an im­ portant weapon to have in you fine arsenal. The are some variations of the four strokes of pocket billiards. The force follow could almost be a stroke of its own. However, when you really take a look at this wonderful skill, you will find that is a draw stroke. Instead of putting back spin on the cue ball, you are putting over spin. You use the same stroke. You hit the cue ball above center instead of below center. With the draw stroke you are shooting a little down on the cue ball. With the force follow, you are dead level with your delivery. The force follow is difficult to master because many student still shoot down on the cue ball and turn their force follow into a punch stroke. The Stun could be a stroke of it’s own. There are many things you can do with a Stun Stroke. However, when you look closely, you will find that it is a punch stroke, delivered in a unique way. The Stun is very difficult to master. It calls for great skills. Yet it can and will be the difference between winning and los­ ing a game. In fact, I will show you how The Stun can be developed to serve you as a very effective break shot. In my best selling book Point The Way, I called The Stun, “The Creeper” because the cue ball crept forward after making the object ball. Then I learned how to use it to walk the cue ball across the table, so I called it “The Walker”. The Stun is unique in itself, but it comes out of the Punch Stroke. Once we master the four strokes of pocket billiards, we will find ourselves adding a little of one stroke with another. For instance, there are times when you add a little punch with your force follow, a snip draw with your punch. It is important however that you become 44
  • The Four Strokes of Pocket Billiards (cont.) the master of the four strokes of pool. You must reach a point where you will not be using one when you intend to use another. Decide right now that you will master each stroke. Put yourself into action to make that happen. Go through each lesson with com­ plete dedication. Measure your progress on each level. You will be the master of the four strokes of pool. You will be able to define your game. You will increase your focus on each shot. You will get better results. In this Lesson there will be times when I tell you to “Know what You Want; Take Action; Measure Your Progress.” Apply these el­ ements to your mastery of this book. Be sure to work hard on each lesson. Measure your progress. Do not stop until you feel like you have mastered each and every lesson. It is just a matter of time before I meet you in the finals. If you have trouble visualizing any of the four strokes, my Monk 101 video series will help you. Thought for the day “Once we decide to become a master, we are alreay a master.” 45
  • Notes 46
  • The Punch Stroke 8 Lesson 1 The punch stroke–don’t leave home without it. Pocket the object ball in the side pocket and stop the cue ball dead in its tracks. In order to master this game, you must master the most popular stroke in pool. In this Lesson the punch stroke is a soft pop with a center ball hit. Learn to execute the stop shot with a soft hit. Bring the cue ball to a dead stop. Any movement to one side or the other means you have not hit center ball. Remember that cen­ ter ball is actually 1/16 of a tip below center. Be­ low center allows for the curve of the tip. Return to this shot to check your hit. You are developing a skill here. The ability to hit the punch stroke forms your instincts. You can do this by the sound of the stroke. You can do this with your eyes closed. You can do this by the feel of the stroke. Willie Mosconi used the Punch Stroke over seventy percent of the time. It is by far the most popular stroke in pool. You will be using the Punch Stroke to gain position on your next ball. You must be able to stop the cue ball dead in its tracks. Feel the hit, listen to the sound. Famil­ iarize yourself with this unique delivery. There will be times when the pressure is on and you need to 47
  • The Punch Stroke (cont.) deliver a crisp punch stroke. You will want to rely upon your instincts and reduce the outside pres­ sure. Turn within and make the shot. Move on to the next one. Take away the interference. If the shot calls for a punch stroke then you deliver the goods without concern for the results. The punch stroke is vital to the game. Be sure your cue is level, solid, and pause in your back stroke. When you face this shot, stand with feet apart. Then drop your right leg back. Make sure this leg stays in line with the shot. Move your left leg forward slightly, with your left toe pointed at the target. Lean over and be sure your chin is even with the joint of your cue. Extend your bridge hand to the table and rest the shaft between your fin­ gers. The inner portion of your right thigh should be lined up with the target. Your target is the spot on the object ball. It is not the cue ball. Your right shoulder should be in line with the target. The left toe is in line with the target. With a stance like this, you should be able to shoot the shot with your eyes closed. If you want to work on your stance, and you should from time to time, shoot shots with your eyes closed once you get down in position. Rely upon your stance to make the ball. Your grip should be loose, about four inches from the bal­ ance point. With this set up, you are ready to de­ liver the stroke you desire. Thought for the day “I never shoot until I am ready.” 48
  • The Punch Stroke – 2 8 9 9 Lesson 2 In this lesson, I want you to be able to deliver the punch stroke even though you are not straight in. You are shooting a stop shot. Focus on a nice clear crisp punch stroke. The punch stroke is the natural stroke in pool. If you can get your desired position with a punch stroke, you would do it the natural way.You reduce your chances of error when you can let the cue ball go where it naturally wants to go. With the punch stroke, you will get a “V”. The cue ball will go to the rail and come out via the same angle in. Thus a “V” is achieved. If you do not get a “V”, then there is something wrong with your punch stroke. For instance, if the cue ball comes out at a wider angle, you have allowed some draw into your punch stroke. If it comes out at a tighter angle, you have allowed some follow in your stroke. This is a good way to test your punch stroke capabilities. You get a “V” when you de­ liver a good punch stroke. So your natural shot would be to deliver a punch stroke and play posi­ tion for the nine ball in the same corner. In this case, you have just asked yourself to do something very natural. You have cut down the reasons for missing the shot. 49
  • The Punch Stroke – 2 (cont.) Sometimes in a shot like this, we stand a little too far from the cue ball. As a right hander, when you face the shot, you drop your right leg back, move your left leg in line and lean over, some­ times you end up slightly too far from the cue ball. Then, you hit the cue ball with the end of your stroke, thus, the cue ball comes off as if you delivered a follow stroke. When you are not get­ ting that nice “V” you may want to check to see that you are close enough to the cue ball to be able to deliver the proper stroke. When I face a shot like this, I go to a spread eagle stance. I sim­ ply spread my legs apart and I am able to main­ tain a proper distance from the cue ball so I can deliver a nice crisp hit and get the results I desire. In this case, I focus on lining up my right shoul­ der with the shot. Sometimes it is necessary to drop my grip hand back a couple of added inches to be able to deliver a nice solid hit on the cue ball. Remember you want to drive through the cue ball. Thought for the day “I see the spot on the object ball and deliver the winning stroke” 50
  • The Punch Stroke – 3 8 99 Lesson 3 In this lesson we simply want to gain good position on the nine ball for the side pocket. Since we know the punch stroke will give us the “V” and good position, we don’t need to fool around with anything unnatural. This is a center ball hit. In our case, we use one sixteenth below center to gain a pure center ball hit. Go to your spread eagle stance, pause in your back stroke, deliver a good solid nice sounding punch stroke, and get ready for an easy shot in the side pocket. If you are un­ der pressure you can reduce it by understanding exactly what you need to do, and by listening for your great sounding punch stroke. Let the shot do the rest. Thought for the day “Today I deliver a straight, smooth, solid stroke on all winning shots.” 51
  • The Punch Stroke – 4 8 9 9 Lesson 4 Here you are getting more distance with the cue ball. Use a punch stroke and allow the cue ball to reach the target area. Learn to do this with a nice smooth hit. Once you master this skill you will find improvement in other areas of your game. Use a more pronounced follow-through to gain more distance with the cue ball. Get a feel for how to control the distance with the cue ball. If you use a draw stroke, you actually kill the natural speed and come up short. To gain position with a draw stroke, you will need to use more force. Most of us would normally use low right with a draw stroke and we could get position on the nine ball. When we use low right, we need to allow for deflection on the cue ball. In other words, if we hit the cue ball on the lower right side, it will deflect the cue ball to the left. So we would have to allow for this deflection in our aim­ ing. The amount of deflection is relative to the force of our stroke. Sometimes we are not always in control of this force, and we allow too much for deflection, or too little for deflection. When we are allowing for deflection, we are giving ourselves a reason for missing the shot. We are putting spin 52
  • The Punch Stroke – 4 (cont.) on the cue ball. This will throw the object ball. So we have to consider how much throw will happen when we line up the shot. Another reason to miss the shot. We are using spin on the rail to gain the desired distance for position on the nine ball. So we need to get a feel for how much spin we are going to have. Spin is relative to how much chalk is on the tip, the kind of tip we have on our cue, the type of cue we are using. Another reason for missing the shot. With the draw stroke we have given ourselves three added reasons for missing the shot, yet, in spite of all the adjustments we have to make, we are usually successful with the shot. However, if we use a nice punch stroke, slightly below center, follow through with our cue, we will get the desired position and not risk the built in variables that come from low right with a draw stroke. In a shot like this, it is important to be deliberate. Pause just before delivering your finest punch stroke and enjoy the positive results. Thought for the day “My hit always has a fine sound.” 53
  • Value of the Punch Stroke 8 99 Lesson 5 Here is another fine opportunity to demon­ strate the value of a punch stroke. We will be shoot­ ing the eight ball into the corner pocket and al­ lowing the cue ball to travel three or four rails around the table for position on the nine ball. With a draw stroke the cue ball will lose speed. With a follow stroke you will scratch in the side pocket. Since the punch stroke does not alter the natural dynamics of the shot, you will be able to control your speed. To master the punch stroke is to master the game. The punch stroke gives you natural track lines. In other words, the cue ball goes where it wants to go. This is why Willie Mosconi used the punch stroke over seventy percent of the time. This is another reason to choose the punch stroke. It gives you natural speed. With the punch stroke you do not alter the natural track lines, and you do not alter the natural speed. Line up for Lesson Five and deliver a nice crisp punch stroke. Listen for the wonderful sound of a committed stroke. You do not have to slam the ball. And watch the cue ball travel around the table for perfect position on the winning nine ball. 54
  • Value of the Punch Stroke (cont.) If you travel three rails, and scratch in the cor­ ner pocket, give yourself added bonus points. You have just delivered a perfect punch stroke. This is a good lesson for working on your trust skills. You are close to the object ball. You have a cut shot. It looks like you will scratch in the side pocket. It looks like a hard shot to make. Yet you are required to trust yourself and deliver a punch stroke. The stroke does all the work. I talk about trust skills in my book I Came To Win. If you can trust yourself to do the right thing, you will experience better results. Too often we hold back, when a full commitment is required for success. Thought for the day “I deliver the finest stroke.” 55
  • Have a Great Follow Stroke “A” Lesson 6 The follow stroke is the first stroke we learn. Simply allow the cue ball to roll towards the ob­ ject ball and follow along behind it. Just roll the ball and follow through. Use both parts of the “Have a Great Follow Stroke” lesson to develop your touch. Master these exercises. Improve on your score each time you practise. Shoot the first ball into the corner pocket us­ ing a follow stroke. The cue ball must roll for­ ward after contact with the object ball on each shot Replace the object ball where the cue ball stopped and reset the cue ball at the starting point. Shoot again, allowing the cue ball to move forward with the follow stroke. Set up an object ball where the cue ball stopped. Begin again. The object of this exercise is to shoot the object ball and control the cue ball so it does not move very far. At some point you will run out of room. Count up your score, see how many time you can hit the cue ball before your cue ball is all the way down table. Lis­ ten to the sound of your fine follow stroke. You will know the difference between the follow stroke and the punch stroke. Thought for the day “My intention is my drive.” 56
  • Have a Great Follow Stroke “B” Lesson 7 Shoot the object ball into the corner pocket. Mark with a piece of chalk where the cue ball stopped. Reset the cue ball and object ball at their original starting points. Shoot the object ball and allow the cue ball to pass the chalk. Move the chalk to where the cue ball landed. Begin again. Remem­ ber if the cue ball doesn’t pass the chalk, you are finished. Shoot until you run out of room. Count up your score. Remember, the cue ball must pass the chalk on each shot. Thought for the day “My will is connnected to my desire.” 57
  • Stroke and English Lesson 8 This is a nice time to really test your follow stroke. Shoot this ball, and allow the cue ball to follow it directly into the side pocket. You must be smooth here. I will allow you to use one quarter cue tip above center. Feel the follow through of your soft stroke. Get a good feel for your follow stroke. Thought for the day “I deliver the finest stroke.” 58
  • Stroke and English (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 9 Repeat your nice smooth follow stroke here. Use one cue tip low and one cue tip left, use a nice soft smooth follow stroke and watch the cue ball go to the rail, and walk softly and tenderly back for perfect position on the nine ball. You can get position with a punch stroke. You can get po­ sition with a draw stroke. You can get position with a follow stroke. In this case, you have more con­ trol with the smooth follow stroke. Any time you come into your target zone with the cue ball, you want to be coming in slowly, under control. This is a good chance for you to work with your stroke. Use your stroke to gain favorable position. Thought for the day “On every shot I am relaxed.” 59
  • Stroke Determines Track Line D C B A 1 2 3 6 7 8 8 Lesson 10 This exercise shows how the stroke determines the track line. To reach point A you will be using center ball with a punch stroke. Point B can be reached with one half cue tip above center with a punch stroke. To reach point C, you will need to use center ball with a follow stroke. One half cue tip above center with a follow stroke will get out to point D. This is an excellent test of your stroke control, and it demonstrates how to control the track line with the use of a stroke. Center ball can get you point A and center ball can get you to point C. The determining factor is your use of stroke. In every shot you take you will have a per­ sonal time with that effort. Take a moment to pre­ pare for the shot. Visualize the desired results. Experience it. And then deliver the proper stroke to win the game. You are gaining position by use of your stroke. You are making it happen with your personal skills. Listen to the sound when the cue tip makes contact with the cue ball. You will know when you have hit the shot correctly. 60
  • Stroke Determines Track Line (cont.) The eight ball is one chalk width out from the bottom rail. The cue ball is between the number six diamond and the number one diamond. Cen­ ter ball is always one sixteen below center. We need to allow for the curve of the tip in order to create a true center ball hit. To reach point A you will need a crisp punch stroke. Repeat lesson one. Deliver a nice pop shot, stop shot, stick shot. To reach point B you will need to use a punch stroke again, but this time, you will be hitting the cue ball one half cue tip above center. To reach point C I want you to use center ball, with a follow stroke. Isn’t is amazing? You use a center ball hit to reach point A and a center ball hit to reach point C. To reach point D, I want you to use one half cue tip above center. Isn’t it amazing? To reach point B you use one half cue tip above center and to reach point D you use one half cue tip above center. You have moved the cue ball to two differ­ ent positions on the table with the same tip loca­ tion. This is an excellent test of your stroke con­ trol. And it clearly demonstrates that “The Stroke Determines The Track Line”. This is the material for The Masters. Thought for the day “My cue glides through the cue ball as if it were not there.” 61
  • Consistent Track Line – 1 A B 8 99 Lesson 11 I want you to use one cue tip high right and gain position for the eight ball in the pocket marked A. In this case, you will be using your finest punch stroke. It will take all of your skills. The cue ball must walk directly down the table without touch­ ing the long rail. See if you can walk the cue ball into the corner pocket. Learn to control the cue ball with your stroke. I have had students at the Academy take a long time to master this shot. It seemed inconceivable that they could use a punch stroke with high right and walk the cue ball di­ rectly to the corner pocket. With practice and time, they were able to master the shot. Know what you want. Take action to gain it and measure your progress along the way. Do this in every lesson. Each lesson is a skill you must master to be able to put your complete game to­ gether. I know what you need to be a champion and I have included all the skills in these lessons. Each one is vital to your development. You want to be a fine player. Follow The Les­ son faithfully and measure your progress. 62
  • Consistent Track Line – 1 B 8 Lesson 12 In this lesson you will be using the exact same cue tip location. One cue tip high right. Deliver your finest force follow stroke and play position for the eight ball in the pocket marked B. Of course this is a free stroke shot so it will be easier than the previous lesson. I want you to make contact with the long rail before settling in for an easy shot on the eight ball. Try to hit the number two diamond. Develop a feel for the shot. Once again, you know what you want. You step up to the table to deliver the stroke, and you can measure your progress. Do these three things in all your endeavors. Along the way, you will want to make adjustments. If something is not work­ ing, you will be able to change your approach and make it happen. This is why it is important to mea­ sure your progress. This is why I have these les­ sons here. I want you to be able to measure your skills. Each of these shots takes a specific skill. Once you master this skill, you will be able to use it in a variety of other shots. Not only have I helped you with a specific shot, I have helped you de­ velop skills to handle a wide range of problems. 63
  • Float to the Target A B Lesson 13 As you recall in exercise 2, 3 and 4 you are getting a “V” when you use a punch stroke. It will be no different in this exercise. Shoot object ball A using center ball and a punch stroke for posi­ tion on object ball B. This position will be consis­ tent with the use of this stroke. In this lesson we can uncover some serious problems. If you are consistently missing this shot, you may have a vi­ sion defect. I have had talented students fail with this exercise. They thought they were hitting cen­ ter ball on the cue ball when in fact, they were ever so slightly right of center. This caused them to hit the rail just before the object ball and rattle the shot. In addition, the cue ball went straight across the table. After several misses, I instructed them to shoot ever so slightly left on the cue ball. The ever so slightly left was really center ball for them. They hit the shot perfectly with this minor adjustment. Once they became aware of their vi­ sion problems, they were able to adjust. With this new adjustment, they moved on to the next level. This is why it is important to measure your progress. If you are doing the same thing over and over, then you will need to make an adjustment. 64
  • Float to the Target (cont.) In Vegas I had four students fail over and over with this lesson. We worked for over an hour and I could not find their problem. Finally, I handed one of them my cue and walked around the table to watch his line up. He executed the shot per­ fectly. All four students were using an inferior cue. The cue I was using at the time was a Viking, which was of fine quality. I could rely upon the consis­ tency of the hit. If you have problems with this lesson, it may be in your vision, or it may be in your cue. You will be hitting ball first here. The cue ball hits the object ball, goes to the rail, comes out in a “V”. Thought for the day “My head stays down until all the balls come to a stop.” 65
  • Rely Upon Your Stroke 99 8 Lesson 14 Here is a pattern for you to work on. Use a punch stroke on the first shot. Hit the cue ball one half cue tip above center to walk the cue ball across the table for position on the eight ball. You should be set up for a nice crystal clear punch stroke that will take you out for a straight in shot on the nine ball in the side pocket. You will find that you can be consistent with your position play if you rely upon your stroke. Do not be tentative here. Deliver a crisp punch stroke. Mean what you do. If you are even the slightest bit tentative on this shot, you will fail to pocket the object ball. Any time you shoot a ball, you must mean what you are doing. If you have my book I Came To Win, you will understand what I am saying. I Came To Win means you are not even the slightest bit tentative about what you are doing. Thought for the day “I must have a copy of The Monk’s book I Came To Win. 66
  • Gently Walk the Ball Lesson 15 Here is your opportunity to demonstrate a soft punch stroke. Note the track line when you use the punch stroke. The cue ball will gently walk to the desired area. Don’t pass by this lesson. You need to work on your soft punch stroke. Return to Lesson One and shoot some real soft punch shots by going low on the cue ball. Do not draw the ball back. Stop it dead in its tracks. Make sure the cue ball goes in a direct straight line in this lesson. If you get a slight curve here, you are allowing draw to creep into your punch stroke. Try some long full table stop shots. Note how low you need to go on the cue ball to stop it dead in its tracks. Work on long stop shots until you can shoot them with a nice soft click. You will be surprised by how important it is for you to de­ velop the ability to deliver the punch stroke at a variety of speeds. Thought for the day “My eyes are perfectly aligned with the shot.” 67
  • Float Down B 8 7 A Lesson 16 We need to play position for the seven ball on the lower rail. Since the eight ball is blocking pocket B, we need to float down for a shot in pocket A. Now is the time to deliver a nice soft punch stroke. We will be getting our “V” so we know where the cue ball is going. Be sure to bring the cue ball to the number one diamond and let it float into position for a shot on the seven ball. Once you master the stroke, you will be able to gain favorable position almost every single time. This will win you more games. You know what you want. You step up to the table and take action. You measure your progress. If you need to, you make adjustments. This skill will help you in many other situations. Stay with this lesson. Fall in love with the punch stoke. Have an affair with the punch stroke. Marry the punch stroke. Don’t leave home without it. Thought for the day “I know what I want, and I want it now.” 68
  • Consistent Track Line – 2 99 Lesson 17 This exercise will help you develop consistent track line control. In the first shot, you will be delivering a soft stroke to achieve the position for the object ball down into the corner. Master this series of shots as it will enable you to handle a host of problems in your future games. (Lessons - 17, 18, 19, 20) Thought for the day “I am part of the set up.” 69
  • Consistent Track Line – 2 99 Lesson 18 This second lesson calls for a tighter line into and out of the corner to achieve the desired posi­ tion. We want to pocket the nine ball in the side pocket. Naturally you will be using a nice crisp punch stroke so you control the cue ball into and out of the corner. It is in the stroke. You are the master and have complete control of the track line. 70
  • Consistent Track Line – 3 Lesson 19 This third shot requires you to open up the line and come out to the middle of the table for posi­ tion on the object ball into the side pocket. You may do this with some follow dynamics in your stroke. You will notice a difference in your stroke for each lesson, yet it is the same shot. Thought for the day “I am part of the end of the shot.” 71
  • Consistent Track Line – 4 8 99 Lesson 20 This fourth shot requires a crisp, snappy punch stroke to go four rails for position on the ball in the side pocket. There are some days when I am not capable of hitting this shot. I simply do not have the stroke that allows me to hit the diamond number one on the long rail and then to the bottom short rail for position on the nine in the side pocket. When this happens I walk away from this lesson. But I come back from time to time so I know I will have the stroke when I need it. Make sure you include Les­ son Twenty in your practice sessions. You will be glad you did. Thought for the day “I am free to shoot each shot.” 72
  • Bunt Shot Lesson 21 Shoot the object ball softly into the side pocket. Do not allow the cue ball to contact the rail. This is a very soft shot. We call this a bunt. There will be many times when you need to call upon your bunt skills during a match. In The Monk 101, Volume One video, Suzanne used The Bunt several times in her thirty ball “Touch No Rail” exercise. The bunt is a powerful weapon. When you want to roll across the table and freeze up against the eight ball for a safety, you will need to use a bunt. Don’t pass this by. You will be glad you have this wonderful skill. Thought for the day “I do not get ahead of myself.” 73
  • Bunt Shot Lesson 22 B A Shoot ball A into the side pocket. By using the bunt you can get position on ball B. Listen to the sound of your bunt. Chop through the cue ball, one quarter tip. Allow the cue tip to stop just as you hit the cue ball. Note how far the object ball will roll when you make contact. It will roll further than you think. Set this shot up and work on it. Then try The Bunt on a long slight cut shot into the corner. The cue ball almost stops. It is amazing what you can do with The Bunt. Thought for the day ”I am an integral part of the shot at hand.” 74
  • Have a Great Draw Stroke Lesson 23 Thought for the day This is a great exercise in controlling your draw stroke. Shoot the object ball into the side pocket and draw the cue ball back slightly. Place a chalk where the cue ball landed. Reset the cue ball and object ball where you started. Shoot the object ball and draw the cue ball back a little further than your first shot (past the chalk). Place a chalk where the cue ball landed. Reset the cue ball and object ball. Shoot the object ball and draw past the chalk. Remember you are trying to move the cue ball just beyond the chalk. The object of the exercise is to shoot as many draw strokes as you can be­ fore you run out of room. Count up your score. If the cue ball doesn’t come back past the chalk, you are done. Master the controlled draw. “My actions are part of my destiny.” 75
  • The Draw Lesson 24 The draw stroke is the most abused stroke in pocket billiards. Very few players have command of this fine skill. Sometimes, a player will use draw when he/she does not know what to do. Other times, players simply miss-use this stroke and end up with terrible position. There are so many prob­ lems surrounding the draw stroke. This is a miss cue stroke. Players jump right over the object ball when they attempt draw. I’ve seen players stop the cue ball dead in its tracks when they wanted to draw the cue ball back a few feet. Someone al­ ways snickers, “nice draw”. If you walk into a pool room today, you will meet many players who can­ not draw the cue ball. They think it is some kind of a trick shot. It is now time for you to master this weapon and use it to win more games. But first, you must understand the draw. There are four different types of draw we can use in this game. Many times the difference be­ tween winning and losing depend upon your abil­ ity to use the right draw stroke. Each draw stroke gives us a different result. – The Follow Through Draw – The Snap Back Draw – The Snip Draw – The Bounce Back Draw 76
  • The Draw (cont.) I have four lessons to teach you these fine skills. Make sure you take the time to master each one and understand when they should be used. For instance, without the Snip Draw, you could not get through the “Touch No Rail” exercise. You would not be able to run a rack of eight ball with­ out the Snip Draw. And there will be time when you use a Follow Through Draw and miss posi­ tion because you need to use the Snap Back Draw. It is not enough to simply pull the cue ball back to you. You need to do this under complete control and in a variety of ways. The Draw Stroke is the ability to impart dramatic spin on the cue ball. Snap your cue through the cue ball with a quick flick of your wrist. It does not have to be a powerful blast. A nice crisp snap will do. Note the stroke you use. Note the manner in which you contact the cue ball. Now try this same stroke when you use one cue tip above center on the cue ball. You have delivered a force follow. You have im­ parted dramatic spin on the cue ball. It races for­ ward just like it races backwards when you use a below center hit. Both the force follow and the draw stroke are the same. The stroke is the same, only the cue tip location is different. It is impor­ tant to understand this as you will want to develop control over this stroke so you can send the cue ball exactly where you intend to. With practice, you can send the cue ball exactly where you in­ tend to. With practice, you can use a force follow to get precise position on your next shot, or you can use below center draw to gain precise posi­ tion on the next shot. When you impart dramatic spin on the cue ball, either forward or backwards, you have used a draw stroke. 77
  • The Follow Through Draw Lesson 25 There are different types of draw strokes. You have a slight angle, but would like to bring the cue ball into the circle. Use a “follow through” draw. Follow through more and “dig” into the ball. It will curve first and then spin straight back into the target area. Any time you want to move the cue ball away from your object ball and then back towards you, the “follow through” draw will be used. Thought for the day “There is always something to overcome. That is why I overcome.” 78
  • The Snap Back Draw Lesson 26 A “snap back” draw stroke will tighten the line and whip the cue ball back towards you. Start with a slight angle. You would like to bring the cue ball into the circle. Use a whip like motion. “Snap” the cue ball. If you execute cor­ rectly the cue ball will come straight back. Thought for the day “If I concentrate on each shot I won’t need to throw my arms up in the air and say, “I can make that shot a hundred times in a row.” 79
  • The Follow Through Draw vs The Snap Back Draw 99 A B Fol low thr oug h S n a p b a c k Lesson 27 Use a “follow through” draw to gain position on the nine for pocket A. This calls for your finest “follow through” draw. Use a “snap back” draw to gain position for the nine in pocket B. You will need to be crisp here. As you can see, a simple draw stroke is not enough to gain favorable position. You must be the master of the four draw strokes as the game will demand you use one over the other to gain position on the winning shot. At The Monk Billiard Academy, we spend a lot of time with this lesson. Thought for the day “Never, never, never apologize for a fine perfor­ mance.” 80
  • Snap Back Draw vs The Follow Through Draw 8 99 Lesson 28 Here is a situation where the “snap back” is the only draw stroke to use if you want to get a good shot on the nine ball. A “snap back” draw on the eight ball will pull the cue ball back without making contact with the nine ball, thus leaving you a clear shot into the same pocket. If you us a “follow through” draw, you will circle around the nine and make contact. You don’t know where the nine will end up, and you don’t know where the cue ball will land. You have no control when this happens. So a “snap back” stroke is demanded here. Be sure to master each one. One wins the game, the other loses the game. Thought for the day “I make a conscious effort to see what I am seeing on the table.” 81
  • Rail Draw 99 Lesson 29 Practice this shot with a draw stroke going two rails. Then go one rail with inside english. Move the cue ball and object ball around and practice variations of this shot. Thought for the day “I have an indifference to winning. I have an indif­ ference to losing, for I am caught up in the shot at hand. 82
  • Snip Draw Low Right Lo w L ef t Lesson 30 Give yourself a slight angle with this shot and shoot the object ball into the corner pocket with­ out allowing the cue ball to touch any of the other object balls. The cue ball must come back ever so slightly to qualify as a draw. You will need to de­ liver a crisp snip to achieve these results. The “snip” draw is a vital skill. You will be using low right in this case, so you can throw the object ball to the left, thus allowing you to hit more of the object ball. Since you are getting throw on the ob­ ject ball, your aim can be straighter. In other words, you don’t have to cut the ball as much. You will find that you pocket the ball more often when you use a good “snip” draw. In fact, I have missed this shot by two diamonds and the object ball still rolled into the pocket. Be sure to shoot table speed. Just enough so that the object ball rolls slowly into the pocket. You may not understand the value of this skill at first. Be patient. When you master the “snip” draw you will be using it to win many games. It is a vital skill. You will never be a great player with­ out the “snip” draw. Lesson Thirty is how you de­ velop this skill. 83
  • Snip Draw (cont.) 8 99 When you are good at The Snip Draw, place the nine ball down near diamond number two. Set it up so a ball can fit through between the rail and nine ball with about a quarter of an inch of space left over. Then return to the shot. It does not look like you can miss the nine ball and make the shot, but you can. Try it. Stay with it. A nice Snip Draw will allow you to sneak past that nine ball. You sight the shot as if the nine ball is not there. Then you add just a little more throw to the shot. This throw takes you inside the nine ball. You will de­ velop the instincts to succeed with this shot. In fact, you will know if you missed the nine ball the instant you stroke the cue ball. You will know if you succeed or fail long before the eight ball is on the way. 84
  • Snip Draw – 2 99 Lesson 31 Not only do you throw the object ball with The Snip Draw, but you kill the cue ball as well. Shoot this shot into the corner and do not allow the cue ball to drift across the table and make contact with the rail. In other words, use The Snip Draw to kill the cue ball. It can be done, we do it all the time at The Monk Billiard Academy. Thought for the day “I develop my instincts with each shot.” 85
  • The Snapper A B Lesson 32 Snap the cue ball back into position for ball B. Use low left, but not too much. I would like you to go back to the Snap Back Draw for this lesson. We see this set up in the game of nine ball. I call this shot “The Snapper” be­ cause you are required to deliver a nice snap to the cue ball for favorable position on the nine ball. This shot requires a little bit of snip in the stroke so you will not fly two rails. Try to get into the circle area. The Snapper is a Snap Back Snip Draw. Who says this game is easy? Wait till you need to use the Snap Back Snip Follow Through Bouncer. Thought for the day “I develop my instincts with each shot.” 86
  • The Bouncer AB Lesson 33 Shoot object ball A into the side for position on object ball B. This is a Bounce Back Draw stroke. Bounce the ball into position. Do not spin the ball. Your consistency will be higher using a bounce. Get a feel for The Bouncer. You are not spin­ ning the cue ball backwards. You are actually bouncing the cue ball into position. The Bounce Back Draw is really a Stun backwards. You will need to master The Stun in order to master the Bounce Back Draw. There are times when we need to incorporate a Bounce in our Punch Stroke. We need to Bounce off the object ball to gain more distance with the Punch Stroke. Once you master the Bounce Back Draw, you will find that you have many uses for this wonderful skill. There are four draw strokes in this game: – The Follow Through Draw. – The Snap Back Draw – The Snip Draw – The Bounce Back Draw 87
  • The Spin Stroke A B Lesson 34 Practice this shot. It should be shot very softly. I have found myself using The Spin Stroke to win games. There have been times when the dif­ ference between winning and losing came down to my Spin Stroke skills. This is a stroke that was used by many of the old timers. They use The Spin Stroke to gain better control of the cue ball. We use side spin and flick our wrist. You can hear a Spin Stroke. It is crisp. It imparts side spin on the cue ball and it is this spin that carries you to your desired position. Try this Lesson and see how of­ ten you get good position. I use the back english method to perfect my Spin Stroke. Thought for the day “This too shall change.” Success will change, losing will change. 88
  • Spin for Position A 99 Lesson 35 Many players will try to use a follow stroke with inside english to go one rail for position on the nine ball. This takes some effort. You need to hold up the cue ball. You need to allow for deflec­ tion and throw. Sometimes you can scratch in the side pocket or even make contact with the nine ball. With the one rail shot you are going against the grain. You are fighting the cue ball. You are trying to hold it up. I like the two or three rail shot. Use a crisp Spin Stroke and go where the cue ball wants to go. Follow the track line to per­ fect position every time. A Punch Stroke could scratch in the corner. You need the Spin Stroke to expand the track line off the first rail and this takes you to an easy shot on the nine ball. Take the nine ball and put it in front of the side pocket. Play the same shot. Only this time, move the cue ball further to the center of the table for an easy shot in the side pocket. Get a good feel for this lesson. This is a good lesson to try some back english. There are times when the Back English system should be used. This in one of them. Focus on your delivery. 89
  • Develop Your Stroke A B Lesson 36 This is a great lesson for developing stroke and speed. Shoot object ball A with a Spin Stroke and go three rails for position on object ball B. Reset object ball A and shoot object ball B with three rail position for object ball A. Reset B and continue back and forth. Stay with this until you master the stroke. Thought for the day “When we willfully sabotage a fine performance, there has to be a payoff somewhere. Find out what it is and you can end the self destructive behavior.” 90
  • A Vital Series You are about to embark upon the most im­ portant material in my entire series. The 2-7-2 is vital to your own personal development in this game. It is the foundation to a championship per­ formance, I thank you for letting me share this fine program with you. Take it to heart. Make it an important part of your game. Up to now, you are a butterfly fluttering its wings. You are ready to take to the air and celebrate your own being. The 2-7-2 series is your wings. Take your time mastering this series, for it will be a part of your game for the rest of your career. In our pocket billiard experience we establish anchors to our personal makeup. When we are in an intense emotional state, what happens around us gets associated with our experience. These as­ sociations are anchors. We need to be careful how we deal with anchors. They must be positive or they will bring us down. As we build the 2-7-2 experience, we must anchor good feelings within our hearts. We must be positive. We must deal in success. This is why it is vital for us to do well in this series. Stay with it until you master the speed of each shot in the program. 91
  • A Vital Series (cont.) Make your anchors a feeling of success. Now is the time to become intimate with success so when you are called upon to deliver a 2-7-2 shot, you will be relaxed and confident. You will be fully ready to win. I can send you out into battle with a fine Punch Stroke because by now you possess that great skill. You also have a great Draw Stroke and understand the four draw strokes of pool. You have worked on your Follow and Spin Stroke so you are ready for battle, right? Not yet. I would be the worst of mas­ ters if I sent you into combat at this stage of your development. I cannot enter you into the tourna­ ment until I help you master speed. Speed is what will help you become the player you desire. The 2-7-2 series will help you develop good speed skills. You must feel the experience when you are successful with each 2-7-2 shot. This is your an­ chor. Anchor this wonderful feeling in your mind. Develop the expectation of success with each of these shots. You are conditioning an automatic expectation with the shot. Get in touch with the feelings you have just before you deliver the win­ ning stroke. Be one with those feelings. They are your anchors to success and when you are in a pressure situation, you can touch these feelings so you will be able to experience success with the shot at hand. An anchor can be anything. I touch the bill of my hat when I feel like I am going to make the shot. You can express your own personal anchor in your pre-shot routine. 92
  • A Vital Series (conclusion) You need to develop good speed to win more games. The 2-7-2 exercise will do this for you. It is your beginning to a new and exciting game. Master the ability to send the cue ball three rails and back to the circle. You will be glad you did. When you are successful with the 2-7-2, enter this in your mind’s computer. Anchor it so you can fall back on this feeling time and time again. I have added five shot to this series. Use your fabulous 2-7-2 speed to succeed with each shot. Fall back on your anchor. Get in touch with the sound of your 2-7-2 and use this to make each of the five shots. Some of the shots will call for a stronger hit than a basic 2-7-2, but all of the shots will require you to use the 2-7-2 anchors for suc­ cess. It is uncanny how this works. When you ap­ proach the shot, get in touch with your 2-7-2 ex­ perience and use that to deliver the winning stroke. You must take the time to master this series. In­ grain it within your pool mind. Anchor feeling of success for you will be using the 2-7-2 through­ out your entire journey. If all you learn from The Monk is the 2-7-2 and the five shots, you have spent your money well. Identify with the sound of your personal 2-7- 2 hit. Thought for the day “ I am fully anchored in the success of the 2-7-2 vital series.” 93
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” 2 2 2 Lesson 37 Use one half cue tip left, (running) to send the cue ball to the number two diamond on the long rail, the number seven diamond on the short rail, and number two diamond on the long rail. The cue ball should return to the center of the table. Master this stroke. It is your personal 2-7-2 stroke. Use it to win games. Be sure the cue ball is hitting the connecting diamonds. If you are not connect­ ing the diamonds, you have a flaw in your stroke. The speed of the hit will affect the track lines. Sometimes when you are in this position on the table you need to go to a spread eagle stance. If you are not connecting the diamonds, try this. When you are too far from the cue ball the quality of your hit is diminished. Use one half cue tip left to get the smooth running english. When you enter a tournament in a strange room, use the 2-7-2 to check both the speed of the rails and the quality of the rubber. Once you groove your 2-7-2 stroke, you will know that the table is off, and not you when you test the table. Take a two pound coffee can and make a circle in the middle of the table. Use this as your target. You must connect the diamonds and land in the circle before you consider yourself successful. 94
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” Be sure to connect the number two diamond on the second long rail. Make sure the cue ball is hitting that spot. If it is hitting below the number two diamond, you have a flaw in your stroke. Not only are you building speed with this exercise, you are building quality into your game. You are cor­ recting problems that will plague you all during your career. Set yourself up to deliver a classic 2-7-2. Close your eyes. Shoot the shot and declare out loud if it is “Long, Short or Just Right”. Then open your eyes and see how well you have developed your 2-7-2 instincts. Sometimes I can declare “One inch short, two inches long, just right, etc.” I have seen Suzanne Bosselman declare, “A half inch short.” She lost her temper because she came up one half inch short. I gave her a copy of my new book, “I Came To Win.” Early in my pocket billiards development I realized how valuable it would be to have speed skills. They would apply to a wide variety of situ­ ations in this great game. I dedicated myself to ingrain the 2-7-2 within my system. I anchored the sound of the hit, the feel of the hit, until it became automatic. I can hit fifteen 2-7-2’s in a row directly within the center of the circle. I think I have logged over one hundred thousand 2-7-2’s in my time. When I am faced with a pressure shot, all I have to do is think 2-7-2 and I automatically associate this with a successful experience. At one time, I was placing an object ball in the circle with a quarter on top of it. I could bring the cue ball around from the 2 to the 7 to the 2 and up against the object ball without knocking the quarter off. This is a drill we do at The Monk Billiard Acad­ emy. Any student who can nudge the object ball without knocking the quarter off, gets a monetary reward. 95
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” You need to develop speed in your game. The 2-7-2 is your ticket to great speed control. 2-7-2 is natural speed. With this speed, you can connect the diamonds, and you reduce push and throw on the object ball. You also cut down on deflection if you are using english. 2-7-2 is natural speed. 7 22 We don’t aim directly at the diamond. We aim through the number two diamon. This true con­ tact, if delivered with a true stroke, allows the cue ball to go through the diamond number 7 and then through diamond number two and back to the cen­ ter of the table. 96
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” 8 Lesson 38 Look at this set up. You can make a good hit on the eight ball simply by using your 2-7-2 skills. The eight ball is right on the 2-7-2 line. The 2-7-2 is your best kicking speed. It connects the dia­ monds naturally. 97
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” 8 Look at this set up. The eight ball is on the 2- 7-2 line, but the cue ball is not. So we make an adjustment with the Parallel Shift, explained in The Monk 202 series by “Dr. Cue”. Once we make the adjustment, we simply deliver our 2-7-2 stroke and bingo we hit the eight ball. Make sure you use your 2-7-2 hit. This connects the diamonds. If you want to Master the fine art of kicking, order The Monk 202 Series. 98
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” 8 Look at this set up. The cue ball is on the 2-7- 2 line, but the eight ball is four inches above the number two diamond. It is not on the 2-7-2 line. If the eight ball is four inches up the rail, we aim two inches down the rail. If we use our 2-7-2 stroke, we will always make contact with the eight ball. The 2-7-2 stroke is what keeps the lines natu­ ral. Thought for the day “I am a kicking machine!” 99
  • The Ultimate Stroke “2-7-2” 8 Line of parallel 2-7-2 Line Look at this set up. The eight ball is four inches above the 2-7-2 line and the cue ball is out of the 2-7-2 line. You know you need to make a two inch adjustment on the 2-7-2 line. Once you establish this, you can then do the parallel shift to the cue ball and fire away. Use the 2-7-2 system for kick shots. You will find yourself making more hits with this new skill. Thought for the day “I order the The Monk’s 202 Banking and Kicking series.” 100
  • The“2-7-2+1” Series 8 Lesson 39 Once you master the 2-7-2 natural speed, I want you to apply this instinct with five shots. We will call them the 2-7-2+5. This lesson is the 2-7- 2+1. Since this is the first shot in the series, we will call it a one. Shoot the eight ball into the cor­ ner pocket and bring the cue ball back to the cen­ ter of the table. Any time you shoot a ball down into the corner pocket and bring the cue ball back to the center of the table, you will call this a 2-7-2+1. The eight ball position in this illustra­ tion gives you a natural 2-7-2+1. Shoot a 2-7-2 and listen to the sound. Now repeat that same sound with this shot. Use a little low right if you need it. Listen to the sound. Repeat your finest 2- 7-2. Become one with this experience. Apply your instinct here. You can move the eight ball down towards the pocket, add a little draw to your stroke and bring the cue ball to the center of the table. You can position the eight ball near the number three diamond and bring the cue ball two rails to the center of the table. When you see a shot like this, anchor the 2-7-2+1 in your mind. You are the master of the 2-7-2 and the master of this first shot. You will be relaxed when it is for the cham­ pionship. 101
  • The“2-7-2+1” Series (cont.) 8 If this shot comes up as the first shot in your run, or the key ball, or the final ball, it is still a 2- 7-2+1 and nothing more. I encourage you to shoot this shot from several spots on the table. Thought for the day “A shot is a shot. I shoot all shots like I Came To Win.” 102
  • The“2-7-2+2” Series 7 2 Lesson 40 This shot will come up time and time again in your eight or nine ball run out. You must recog­ nize it as a 2-7-2+2 and be the master of it. Here you will use a little low left, adding a soft pop to your stroke. You want to bring the cue ball to the number seven diamond and then to the number two diamond and back to the center of the table. I have had students at The Monk Billiard Academy try to spin the ball around the rails to the center. They were successful at this fine shot, but it is not the way to do it. Once I got them to use a little pop and stroke the ball around the table, they were far more consistent. Any time you cut a ball into the corner and bring the cue ball two rails, we will call this a 2-7-2+2. Since you are using a little left side english on the cue ball, you will get some deflection. Aim a little thin here and you will make a fine adjust­ ment. As you did in the previous exercise, you may move the object and cue ball around and continue to shoot a 2-7-2+2. 103
  • 2-7-2+2 Series 8 99 Lesson 41 #1 When you are faced with this shot and need to get position on the nine ball for the championship, go to what you know best. The 2-7-2+2. You will find perfect position every time. Do not use one rail shape on shots like this. 8 9 #2 Once again, use your finest 2-7-2+2 to gain position on the winning nine ball. 104
  • 2-7-2+2 Series 8 9 #3 A 2-7-2+2 will help you avoid problems with position. You will be amazed at how many places you can get to by using the shot you know best. Master the 2-7-2+2 and you will be the master. Thought for the day “I came to win this game.” 105
  • 2-7-2+3 Series Lesson 42 This may very well be the toughest shot in the 2-7-2+5 series. Use high left running english with a subtle force follow stroke and run the cue ball two rails to the center of the table. You must con­ tact the number two on the left rail and back to center to consider yourself successful with the 2- 7-2+3. Any time you pocket a ball in the corner pocket and go forward with the cue ball two rails, back to the middle of the table, you will call this a 2-7-2+3. If you scratch in the opposite corner pocket you have allowed punch to creep into your stroke. If you go into the corner tight, you have allowed punch to creep in. You must thrust forward with your stroke, move the cue ball directly to the bot­ tom rail near the number seven and then to the number two. If you see a large “C” in your first track line to the bottom rail, you are using force follow with a little punch. The key to this shot is to keep your cue tip on the cue ball as your thrust forward with your stroke. Visualize a 2-7-2 and push your tip through the cue ball. Send the cue ball around the table. You must stroke this shot. 106
  • 2-7-2+3 Series 8 99 Lesson 43 Everyone can succeed with the 2-7-2+3. Do not shoot down on the cue ball or it will turn into a punch stroke. This shot is vital to your success. You must be the master of it if you are to succeed in tournaments or league play. Email me if you are having trouble: [email protected] www.themonk.com Thought for the day “My winning self image shows in my game.” 107
  • 2-7-2+3 Series 87 99 Lesson 44 #1 Deliver a 2-7-2+3 here for position on the eight ball. Now shoot the eight ball with your finest 2-7-2+3 skills to get po­ sition on the nine ball. If you are really good at this, you can then shoot the nine ball as 2-7-2+3 and get back to the cen­ ter of the table. Well, not totally the cen­ ter of the table, but you can contact the bottom rail and come out near the cen­ ter. Practice the 2-7-2+3 from many places on the table. In a game situation you may have trouble with this shot. It is not an easy shot. When the pressure is on it is hard to deliver the 2-7-2+3. This is why you must practice this until you are the master of it. Learn to shoot it under pressure. 108
  • 2-7-2+3 Series 8 99 #2 In order to get position on the nine ball, you will need to use your fine 2-7-2+3 skills. The 2-7-2+3 will give you a pow­ erful weapon in position play. Thought for the day “Here is a chance to demonstrate your I Came To Win principles.” 109
  • 2-7-2 Series 2 3 1 Lesson 45 Time for a mid term exam here. Shoot this pattern. Of course you recognize the 2-7-2+1 on the first shot. And of course you see the 2-7-2+2 on the second shot. And you will be setting up for a 2-7-2+3 on the third shot. I want you to succeed with this pattern three times in a row. We know what we want. We take action to achieve the results and we measure our progress. If you need to make adjustments, that is, go back and practice these shots some more, then you will do this. Because you know what you want to achieve. And you will not stop until you arrive at the success you deserve. Thought for the day “I claim my success in this game.” 110
  • 2-7-2+4 Series Lesson 46 When I was trapped in my basement working on my game, I discovered if I had a “crack” sound to my stroke, I pocketed this ball many more times than I missed it. So I named it the “cracker”, and every time it came up, I listened for the “crack” sound in my stroke. If I got a good sound and ac­ tually missed the shot, the ball still went in the pocket. When you set up, think of your 2-7-2 and that nice sound you make when you bring the cue ball to the center of the table. Repeat this sound, adding a little “crack” to it. Sometimes we tend to lean out over the table to get a better look at this shot. We get into our stance, and then ever so slightly, lean our head out over the table. We can see the target better this way. You will miss the shot if you do this. Be sure to stay in line with the shot. Stay in line and de­ liver the “crack” to your stroke and you will be a winner many times over. Thought for the day “My trust skills serve me well.” 111
  • 2-7-2+4 Series Lesson 47 #1 Here is another 2-7-2+4. It looks like a different shot. You will use your finest 2-7-2+4 stroke – the “crack” – here and go to the bottom rail and back out. It is refreshingly nice to realize how well this works. Thought for the day “Success is simply a step along the way.” 112
  • 2-7-2+4 Series #2 Use the “crack” here and you will have fine position. Focus on the 2-7-2+4 pop. As you journey through this wonderful game, you will find that the 2-7-2+4 comes up in a variety of ways. This is why you must be the master of it. Thought for the day “Success is who I am.” 113
  • 2-7-2+5 Series Lesson 48 Use soft controlled draw to return the cue ball to the center of the table. Set up the cue ball with slight angle to the object ball. It is not enough to simply draw the cue ball. You must have reference to how far you want to bring the cue ball back. With the 2-7-2+5 you have just such a reference. You must groove this stroke into your mind. Anchor it so you can repeat it at will. You can almost use a perfect 2-7-2 speed with low english to draw the cue ball into the circle. Thought for the day “My body glides across the floor on the winds of winning.” 114
  • Corrective Action Lesson 49 I always enjoy doing this lesson at The Monk Billiard Academy. I get the chance to watch the light go on inside a players head when they suc­ ceed with this stroke. Then I take them to the 2-7- 2+3 and they are able to experience the joy that comes with success. If you are having trouble with the 2-7-2+3 you may work on this shot. Be sure the cue ball con­ tacts below the number one diamond on the long rail. Use a force follow stroke. Remember to fol­ low through and keep the cue tip on the cue ball as long as possible. Send your tip through the cue ball. If the cue ball pops up and hits the object balls along the long rail, you have allowed punch to creep into your stroke. Thought for the day “I have a perfect follow through on all shots.” 115
  • Stun Stroke Lesson 50 Shoot the object ball into the corner pocket and allow the cue ball to creep forward. Contact the cue ball with an above center hit and stun the ball forward. Allow the cue ball to take the place of the object ball. Master the stun. When I was in my basement I discovered The Stun by accident. One day I noticed the cue ball creeping forward consistently when I delivered the stun stroke. Since I had a very little contact with the outside world, I simply named the shot “The Creeper”. In fact, I call it the “Creeper” in my book Point The Way. When you decide to work on your break stroke, do this lesson. Do the Stun. The Stun is a perfect break stroke. It will shatter the balls in every di­ rection and the cue ball creeps forward just a little. Make sure the front three balls are making solid contact with each other and deliver you finest Stun. The Stun exercise is a great way to work on your stance. With this shot, if you are not right on, you will miss the shot every time. I set ten balls on the bottom rail and then shoot ten stuns in one direction and ten stuns in the other. I use each object ball as a cue ball.When I was on, I could make all ten. Most of the time however, I must admit to missing a few in each direction. It is a great workout. 116
  • Stun Variation Lesson 51 This is a variation of the stun exercise. Use an above center hit. Remember to hesi­ tate in your back stroke. This is not an easy shot. Stay with it. You will build a great stroke with les­ son fifty one. It takes a perfect hit to pocket this ball with a stun. • Stand behind the shot. • Lean into the shot • Place foot in proper position • Sight down the shaft • Rock back and forth • Stop on last practice stroke • Pull back, hesitate and deliver the hit • Keep your head down • Stay in position until the balls stop rolling • Make sure you visualize success with each of these steps Thought for the day “Be faithful in practice.” 117
  • Slight Angle Stun Shot Lesson 52 This is another stun shot. You have very little angle. A follow stroke will cause you to contact the object ball on the bottom rail. A punch will stop the ball right there. A stun will allow the cue ball to bounce out and creep into the desired posi­ tion. Remember to raise your cue and shoot down on the cue ball. Create your own energy. Thought for the day “I make no judgement on my performance. It is as it is and I accept it.” 118
  • Kicking Your Way to the Finals Lesson 53 This diagram illustrates a system of halves. If you trust the rails, you can cut the distance in halves to figure out the kick shot. Of course you need to us a 2-7-2 stroke here to keep the angles consistent. Thought for the day “I reach all my goals.” 119
  • Kicking Your Way to the Finals – 2 AB Lesson 54 Shot A requires running english. Shot B requires reverse english. Remember, kicking is relative. The spot on the rail depends on the type of rails, the type of cloth and the environment in the pool hall. Your chalk, the tip or the type of cue you use will have an effect on your track lines. In addition, the kind of stroke you have developed will give you personal track lines. This series is for reference only. You must sharpen your skills and master your own tech­ niques. If you really want to master kicking you should order The Monk 202 series. Tom “Dr. Cue” Rossman shares his comprehensive diamond sys­ tem through this best selling video series. If you master The Monk 202, you will never get caught on three fouls again. Make sure you get Volume One. This exciting video explains the table termi­ nology so well that you will recognize kick shots when they come up. Volume Two is a classic dem­ onstration of the system and Volume Three is for advanced players only. 120
  • Kicking Your Way to the Finals – 3 A B C Lesson 55 1 Track lines A, B and C take you to the corner. Remember when you are close to the rail or tight in the corner you will need to hit a little past the diamond. So on line C you hit past the #1 dia­ mond. Use running english. You will learn to iden­ tify the type of running english you need to make this shot. When your are confident, try some varia­ tions, such as hitting the number six diamond on the short rail so you can come up to the number one diamond on the long rail. Or tighten up the shot so you hit the number one rail. Learn to make adjustments. You will use cross corner kicking in the game of nine ball. Thought for the day “I deserve to win.” 121 6
  • The Monk’s Famous 13 Ball Exercise Lesson 56 Start with ball in hand. Run each ball off with­ out allowing the cue ball to touch another ball. No combinations or bank shots allowed. You will return to this exercise time and time again. Les­ son Fifty Six is designed to groove your stroke. Make this thirteen ball exercise a normal part of your routine. Many of my students are fascinated by this exercise. I give them a visual by running off all the balls and they think it is easy. I have been do­ ing this exercise for a long time because I under­ stand the value of shooting. It is important to be­ lieve in your exercise program. Work on the thir­ teen ball exercise and you will improve your skills in other areas of your game. After a tough match of nine ball come back to this lesson. You will be amazed by how your stroke has gotten out of sync. After a few racks of the thirteen ball exercise you be right back in line. Thought for the day “Each session improves my skills.” 122
  • The Monk’s Famous 13 Ball Exercise (cont.) This is a fine time to set some personal goals. Begin with the desire to complete one rack with­ out touching another ball. Now you know what you want to do. You know the outcome of your goals. Take action by working on the rack. Shoot the balls. Measure your progress. Find out where your game is weak and take the time to strengthen it. Do not get frustrated. We are on a journey. De­ velop an indifference to missing or making the shots. If you miss, place the ball in the pocket, move on and finish the rack. If you complete the assignment, give yourself a pat on the back and set another goal. We are on a never ending jour­ ney, one step at a time. Whatever price is required of us to move to the next level we will gladly pay. May success be a natural part of your life. Thought for the day “Nothing interferes with my performance.” 123
  • Touch No Rails Lesson 57 Start with ball in hand and shoot all the balls off the table without allowing the cue ball to touch any rails. There are many, many, many valuable lessons built into this exercise. Do not pass it by. The beauty of the exercise is that you will be expected to use all your skills. Almost every shot in pool comes up with the Touch No Rail Lesson. The most popular stroke is the snip draw. The punch stroke is used a lot, as is the bunt. You will find that long tough shots are not as hard. The Touch No Rail exercise develops your shooting skills. All lessons are vital is this series. You should commit yourself to the mastery of each lesson. That is your goal. I set a goal to shoot one hun­ dred balls without a miss in this series. I reached that goal and I am very proud of that. I passed sixty several times. When things are not going well, and I am hav­ ing a tough time with my stroke, I go to this les­ son. I use it to bring myself back to the level I need to be at. Set your goal, take action and mea­ sure your results. You will shine as one of our brightest stars. 124
  • Touch No Rails – (cont.) We are climbing the mountain on pocket bil­ liards excellence. We cannot however, keep our eyes on the mountain top. For if we do, we may miss the hand hold in front of us. We shoot the shots and develop the skills. Winning takes care of itself. Thought for the day “I make my decision, lean into my stance, sight down the shaft, and deliver the stroke.” 125
  • The Four Ball Exercise Lesson 58 Thought for the day Shoot each ball into the corner pocket and bring the cue ball to the center of the table. Many a career has ended with this exercise. After you develop the stroke for this exercise, use it as a warm up before matches and tournaments. This is another rewarding exercise. If you go back over the misses you experienced in the game of eight ball and nine ball, you may find that it was one of the four ball exercise shots. Once I worked on this exercise for an extended period of time. I found myself winning many more games. My stroke improved for other shots as well. My record is ten in a row. Forty balls. I think I can do more than that. I use the four ball exercise to groove my stroke. Once I am stroking well, I move on to other lessons. When I am shooting this lesson I pay close attention to the sound of my stroke. Also, I use back english here. “My concentration level is keen, sharp, and I see the shot perfectly.” 126
  • Look Familiar? Lesson 59 This shot comes up often. Hear the “click” of the balls. You will win a lot of games with this shot. I have added this lesson because I want you to recognize situations where the four ball exercise comes up. Here is just such a case. Listen for that sound. Feel that stroke. And see the success of the shot. Thought for the day “I am poised and self assured.” 127
  • For Advanced Players Only Lesson 60 After you have mastered The Lesson, you will still need to organize and define your game. In the world of pocket billiards we are never finished with our training. Here is a score sheet to evaluate you performance. Remember, knowledge and per­ formance is not necessarily related. They do not interact as you would expect. Performance is quite apart from knowledge. It is another entity of it­ self. After you have accumulated the knowledge, you will then go on to performance. Our runouts sometimes break down because we lack an under­ standing of our performance kills. The Monk Bil­ liard Academy score sheet was designated to help you define your game. You can refer to my book I Came To Win to understand the performance part of your game. 128
  • For Advanced Players Only (cont.) The Monk Billiard Academy Score Sheet 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Break Missed Shot Missed Safe Missed Position Missed Kick Choke Inner Game Played to Safe R.O.O. R.O.O.M. R.O.O.F. Must Maker Shotmakers Run Out Success Rating 129
  • For Advanced Players Only Break – Rate your break from one to ten. The key to a good break is in the quality of hit, not in the speed. I think you should try the stun stroke on your break shot. Line up from the left side of the table and aim at the center ball. Use a little left english. You will need to aim slightly left of the center ball. Perhaps a quarter inch. With the left english you will deflect back to the right and make a direct center ball hit on the head ball. Your cue ball will be spinning, much like a bowling ball. And the rack will shatter like glass with balls dropping in the pockets every­ where. Because of your stun stoke, you will keep the cue ball in the center of the table. Rate your break on the ability to deliver the stroke, and the cue ball staying in the center of the table. Choke – There is a difference between choking and inner game break down. When we choke, we choke on the money ball or a key ball in the run. But we are still giving a one hundred percent ef­ fort. When the inner game causes us to miss, it is simply our inability to give one hundred percent to the shot at hand, therefore we have the Choking and Inner Game category. R.O.O. – This is Run Out Opportunity. After you score your break, look to see of you have a R.O.O.. If you do, then mark the R.O.O. box and proceed with your run. R.O.O.M. – This is Run Out Opportunity Missed. You do not want to have a lot of “R.O.O.M” in your game. R.O.O.F. – This is Run Out Opportunity Finished. You want to have a lot of “R.O.O.F.’s”. 130
  • For Advanced Players Only Must Makers – In the course of many runs, we end up with “Must Makers”. These are shots where you are out of line, and you simply must make a shot to keep your run alive. If you have a lot of “Must Makers”, your position play needs some work. It is good to keep track of these shots, to make them is to build strong character. Shotmakers Run Out – Many of our run outs end in the “Shotmakers” mode. We bank the last three balls, or are forced to come up with a bril­ liant shot. It is also good to know if three of our last four run outs were “Shotmakers” run outs. A Shotmakers run out is a sign of poor position play. A shotmakers run out does have its value in that it demands strong character and the ability to hang in there when things get tough. Success rating – Rate yourself from one to ten according to your standards. Do not use this score system often. Use it from time to time to check on your progress. Once you get caught up in the score, you have left the one shot at a time mode and have entered the world of interference. You must always stay in the one shot at a time mode. Use this evaluation to organize your next practice session. Thought for the day “I am responsible for all things on the pool table.” 131
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  • 133 Section Two Mastering Shots
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  • Punch Time 8 99 Lesson 61 Developing your ability to gain position with a punch stroke on this shot. It is vital you develop the understanding of speed on a good punch stroke. Practice getting position for both side pockets. You will note that one requires a different speed than the other. I have faith in you. This is not easy work. This lesson is reserved for champions. And you are such a champion. I do hereby pledge to The Monk to master every one of these shots, so help me God. Signed: _______________________________ Thought for the day “My instincts are in tune with my trust skills.” 135
  • Punch Time 2 X X X X X X 8 99 Lesson 62 Here you will be cutting the eight ball into the side pocket and playing position for the nine in the same pocket. This is where the cue ball wants to go. Remember, “go with the flow”. Don’t “fight the cue ball”. As you can see, if you get the cue ball to any of the spots marked “X”, you are in good shape for the winning nine ball. It is impor­ tant for you and I to see it when it comes up. Re­ member to feel three rails in this lesson. This is an advanced shot. You will be develop­ ing some very fine skills here. At first, it may be difficult to contact the rails for position on the nine. You may come up short and miss position alto­ gether. Don’t be tempted to abandon this lesson. It is not so much the shot I want you to be suc­ cessful with. It is the skill I want you to have. This skill, the ability to control where the cue ball hits on the second rail, will serve you as you move up the ladder. When you reach the level of pocket billiard excellence, I want you to have all the skills you need to stay there. This is where you belong and I want you to feel comfortable with that. 136
  • Force Follow 8 99 Lesson 63 So often we talk about force follow inside english. Yet we do not practice it. And when the shot come up, we miss and promise to work on it. It’s like a leaky roof. Only when it is leaking do we resolve to fix it. When the sun shines, we soon forget the leak. This lesson is in your final exam. You must be prepared to pass it. Use inside, high left and don’t stop until you consistently get posi­ tion on the winning shot. When I give you your final exam, be sure to pass. We’ve worked too hard to fail now. Thought for the day “I am keenly aware of my tip location.” 137
  • Enlightenment 8 99 Lesson 64 Here is a shot where you need to get down table for position on the winning nine ball. If you use draw to go two rails, you will negatively ef­ fect the speed of the cue ball. Position will then become a matter of chance. We know that the punch stroke gives us our most consistent speed. Still, a punch stroke may scratch off this shot. We can reach the near side of the side pocket with a low right, follow through punch stroke. We force the cue ball to come back to the rail with the fol­ low through punch, along with the low right english. With this type of stroke, you will have better control of the cue ball. Try it with a pure center ball stop shot. Then use low right and drive through the ball. You’ll discover a new technique for moving the cue ball around off this type of pattern. Thought for the day “My stroke is smooth, pure and consistent.” 138
  • Be Free – 1 8 Lesson 65 I am almost sorry to give you this assignment. But you must master this shot without scratching in the near corner pocket. You must be able to shoot this shot with the instincts that you are not going to scratch. Once you are aware of the potential for the scratch, you will have difficulty with the shot. Stay with it until you can feel the desired posi­ tion. You must perfect your personal hit here. Track line is relative to your stroke. Do not use english. It is in the hit. When I line up for this shot I say the follow­ ing. “One of us is going to win here. I may scratch and lose, but I will make the ball.” Most of the time I do not scratch. Thought for the day “I am faithful to improve my skills.” 139
  • Shot Ingredients 8 99 Lesson 66 There are all kinds of little nooks and cran­ nies in this shot. Someone left the rack on the table so we can’t go two rails for the nine ball. Use a follow stroke. We will need inside english to pull the ball into position. First the inside english will deflect the cue ball to the left. The inside english will effect the speed of the cue ball. If you shoot it softly, you may masse the cue ball. Then the aim gets even crazier. I included this shot because I want you to master it. You will need it. And you will not want to miss and wonder why. Wondering makes us feel helpless. We are in charge. Develop the instincts for this shot. You will be glad I took the time to share it with you. Thought for the day “My awareness skills dominate my game.” 140
  • Draw and Follow Draw 8 99 Lesson 67 Here is a two way shot. We have the ability to shoot this shot two ways. It is vital we make the right decision and stick to our choice. We can draw tightly into the corner and come out for a shot in the corner pocket, or in the side pocket. Fol low 2 3 1 8 99 Still, we need to be comfortable with the shot. There is less trouble built into the follow stroke. We would be shooting the nine into the same cor­ ner pocket as the eight. If our position is too short or too long, we could end up with a ‘tester”. Mas­ ter both shots and use the one that is serving you best at the time. 141
  • Different Stance for Different Shot 1 2 This series represents two different stances: 1. More spread eagle 2. Need to drop right leg back 99 Lesson 68 When you come to my Academy I will not be working on your stance as much as you would expect. There is no standard stance to be used by everybody. Therefore, it would be a waste of time to teach you the so called classic stance. Every­ one is a different size. People have different vi­ sual skills. We actually see things differently be­ cause your eyesight is different. In each of these cases, the stance would not be the same. Here are two shots. Shot number one requires a spread eagle type of stance, while shot number two requires you to drop your right leg back and lean into the shot. Thought for the day “I am focused on all shots.” 142
  • Understanding Your Track Line 8 7 6 99 Lesson 69 I’m sure with your punch stroke skills, you will have no trouble with Lesson 69. The problem comes with not recognizing the shot. Often times we forget we can play under a ball and get good position in the far corner pocket. You will use low right punch with speed. Shoot this shot many times and check your punch stroke lines. Learn to fol­ low the track lines and develop the skills to ex­ ecute the shots. It is shots like these that keep runs going. If you are having trouble with this lesson, go back to the Snapper. Thought for the day “I have a great punch stroke and I love to use it.” 143
  • The “Slide” Rule Illustration 1 Illustration 2 899899 Lesson 70 Here we have two examples of a slide shot. In the first illustration, we will slide the cue ball to position on the nine. Do not get this shot mixed up with the soft follow through draw. As you can see you are closer to the object ball and a slide will work here. In illustration #2, use the exact same hit on the cue ball. You will see the cue ball slide di­ rectly into the desired position. A slide is a punch stroke with speed. Thought for the day “I never have an easy shot in this game.” 144
  • The “Slide” Rule (cont.) Illustration 38 99 Lesson 71 Now try the same shot on illustration #3. You will see similar results. The “slide rule” is a good tool for slowing the cue ball down. As you can see by now, there are variations of the punch stroke. We add a little bit of this and a little bit of that to get the desired effect. We use the slide when we really want to slow down the speed. With the slide we get the same track lines as the pure punch but we are better able to control the speed of the cue ball. First however, we need to spend however long it takes to develop a con­ sistent punch stroke. So much of these shots come off the punch stroke. If you want to alter the track line for instance, you will need to know exactly where the natural line is and you do this by having a great punch stroke. Thought for the day “I am focused. I hear the cue ball colliding with the object ball.” 145
  • Stroke for Position 3 Reve rse Spin Lesson 72 Note that the cue ball is in line with the num­ ber six diamond and along side the number three diamond. Learn to achieve position at each of the stars off this shot. This is all done with stroke. To reach the long rail, you will need more spin. Which would be center right english. To shorten the line, use a little reverse spin on the cue ball. It is important you master this ability to reach two different cue ball location off this shot. I in­ clude this shot here because you will need this skill to improve your winning average. You will note that this is the 2-7-2+3 shot in two different ways. Thought for the day “I expect to win. I am a winner.” 146 6
  • Get The Stroke 99 Lesson 73 Repeat after me, “I will shoot this shot until I am the master of the ‘get the stroke’ shot. Here you are almost on the rail. Jack up your cue stick and snap off a dramatic draw stroke. Watch the cue ball come back to you. This shot takes a tre­ mendous amount of talent. There are very few players who can execute the “get the stroke” les­ son. The value of this lesson is in the stroke devel­ opment. When you acquire the skills to execute this shot, you now have the finest break shot in the pool hall. Every time you work on this shot, you are working on your nine ball break. This is your break stroke. Use it to warm up before each tournament. Master it and the balls will shatter with this kind of force. With the “get the stroke” lesson you can see how well you are hitting the ball. There is no doubt in your mind. Either the cue ball comes back, or it doesn’t. Thought for the day “I stay down on every shot.” 147
  • Spin Your Way To The Finals 8 99 Lesson 74 This shot has some sneaky dynamics built into it. When we use our 2-7-2+3 stroke, we almost never stop on the long rail and back out. We end up with too much of an angle. A soft roller will never get us far enough. This calls for our per­ fected spin stroke. You must deliver a spin stroke and allow the spin to carry you to position. The spin widens the angle and delivers the right speed. Note the cue ball will pick up speed when it hits the bottom rail. Master the spin stroke and learn to recognize when to use it. Both you and I will be glad you did. Never doubt that I am pulling for you all the way. This shot calls for a 2-7-2+3 mentality but you must add spin to your stroke. It is the spin that will carry you to position. Thrust through your stroke. Do not hit the ball hard. Thought for the day “I am known for my good sportmanship.” 148
  • The Delicate Touch 8 99 Lesson 75 Here you will use a soft touch to get position on the nine ball into the corner pocket. Because you will be using soft reverse spin, you will need to concentrate on the soft hit. Often times we are either too far or too short on this shot. We need to maser it so we cut down the angle and still have the speed. This can be tricky. Too often I have seen players not prepared to deliver the delicate touch this shot requires. They have not practiced it and forget how reverse kills the cue ball off the long rail. They also forget how soft they must hit the cue ball in order to maintain and get good spin on the cue ball. They allow some punch in their spin stroke and actually widen the angle as the cue ball bounces off the object ball. It is indeed a delicate shot and you need to be aware of what is going on.You are working on your speed skills here. Take all the time you need to master this lesson. Thought for the day “My practice is like the finals, I always give my best.” 149
  • Stun Forward 4 5 A Lesson 76 You cannot use a follow stroke in this shot because you will need to play the five ball into corner “A”. And you need to go directly across the table to avoid the balls on the rail. So you will need to use a punch stoke. Still the punch stroke will bring the ball back to the center, as in 2-7- 2+4. In order to move the ball forward, we need to stun the cue ball with inside english. The stun will carry you to the inside rail between the object ball. The english will move you down table for the win­ ning shot. Not an easy shot for your opponent. Thought for the day “I stay in line over the cue stick with each shot.” 150
  • Be Committed 8 99 Lesson 77 This commitment exercise includes four shots. You need to master them, and recognize them when they come up. It is easy. Especially for you. This shot is a power draw. Often we do not think of the draw here. Instead we settle for a stop shot and a tough cut on the nine ball. You are very capable of this draw shot. And the rewards will be great. Snap if off with commitment and enjoy the results. In some cases I will shoot a shot here and bank the nine ball. I feel like this bank shot should be one of your confident banks. If the table is play­ ing tough, you may not want to risk the draw shot as it sometimes rattles the eight. If you are not shooting the power shots well that day, you may want to stop the cue ball for an easy bank. Which­ ever shot you chose to shoot, be fully committed. And that means you cannot second guess yourself if you do not find success with your choice. Make a mental note of your attitude when you do not make a shot. If you cannot look upon this with complete indifference, you are opening the door to future interference. Sometimes we need to prac­ tice our attitude when things do not go as expected. 151
  • Be Committed (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 78 This shot is another draw shot. Once again, we are tempted to play a slow roller and be a great distance from the winning shot. Draw this ball with low left to cut down on the angle and you will be closer to the money ball. All it takes is a commit­ ment. Stay down in the shot. Be sure not to dig too deep and jump over the object ball. Thought for the day “My eyes burn a hole in my target.” 152
  • Commitment 8 99 Lesson 79 Here is another draw shot. You have a slight angle going the other way. A follow stroke will leave you a tough cut shot. Once again, if you de­ liver your snap back draw, you will be in fine po­ sition to win the game. Learning to recognize these situations when they come up is the real art. A rule of thumb here is to avoid long shots to win the game. Find a way to get closer. The draw shot is the most overlooked shot in pool. What is the name of this lesson? You cannot succeed with a power shot if you are not totally committed to the shot. Win or lose, make or miss, you will deliver the finest draw stroke. And check out the thought for this day. Thought for the day “I am never critical of myself.” 153
  • Commitment (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 80 Although this is not a draw shot, I include it here because it calls for commitment. We are tempted to slow roll this to hold up for the win­ ning shot. Don’t do this. Use your fine trust skills and send the cue ball to the bottom rail. You will be happy with the results. I am really excited about what this lesson can do for you – how it can help you develop the skills you deserve to have in this game. Stay the course. Do not get discouraged. We never get discour­ aged because we know we are on the right track. We do not get discouraged because we know we can master every single one of these lessons. And we know the day will come when we will be able to play anybody, anywhere. We are secure in our own personal growth. We are certain in our own game. Thought for the day “I know who I am and what I am, and I like what I see.” 154
  • Overcut 8 Lesson 81 In this case you are shooting over a ball while attempting a soft cut shot on the eight. There are two things you must keep in mind when you are in this situation. First, you do not want to linger with your bridge hand, you will be unstable. The longer you stay there, the more unstable you be­ come. Sight it and shoot it. Secondly, you will want to over-cut this ball. The mere act of shooting high on the cue ball causes a push when the cue ball and object ball collide. Often times we miss this shot when it comes up. Many of our failures come when we forget the inner dynamics built into a shot. Then we blame the table and never know what really happened. Shoot a few of these shots. Don’t pass up this lesson. Thought for the day “I sight, shoot, and make adjustments for the shot.” 155
  • The Monk’s Famous 12 Ball Exercise 99 Lesson 82 There are a series of shots you will need to be comfortable with in order to raise your winning average. In both eight ball and nine ball, the money ball often ends up in this familiar place during the game. Check it out during your next match. If you can make it from any of the cue ball positions, you will win more games. Master this lesson and you’ll be taking home the trophy. I would like to see you complete this exercise without a miss. If you are an advanced level player you should be able to do this two times in a row. My record is thirty four. I missed when I had just two balls left to go into my third rack. I call these shots foundation shots. Master them and you will win many more games. Thought for the day “I love my practice sessions.” 156
  • Sneaky Strange 8 99 Lesson 83 Shoot this shot and gain position on the nine ball by using a soft follow through draw. Here you will be driving through the cue ball. You will be forcing it to the rail. The sheer force of it will bring it into the desired position. It is important not to snap the cue ball. Do not use a snap back draw. Force it with a soft follow through draw. Thought for the day “I believe in myself.” 157
  • Sneaky Strange (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 84 In this shot, we are tempted to deliver a snap back draw stroke. Sometimes the snap back will work, but it is not consistent. Use a soft follow through draw stroke with a little left center english. Gently walk the cue ball into position for an easy shot on the nine ball. Push your cue through the cue ball. Avoid choppy, snappy strokes. Herky jerky movement does not belong in this game. It is not pretty. What makes this “sneaky strange” is that you are not really spinning the cue ball back to your desired position. If you place the nine ball up near the number three diamond, you will have to add some “snap back”. The higher you want the cue ball to come back, the more snap you put in your stroke. Thought for the day “I have a unique gift.” 158
  • Inside the Lines 8 99 Lesson 85 The reason there are so many shots in this les­ son book is because you need to develop a certain stroke to become a great player. All of these shots are stroke developers. You must trust me and mas­ ter each one of them. In this series I “Point The Way” and you travel a successful journey, espe­ cially on this shot. Snap the cue ball with center right (inside) english. You will go to the bottom rail and then the english will take your forward for position on the nine. Make the sound of the “Cracker”. You will love the results. Thought for the day “All the rolls go my way.” 159
  • Take What Is Offered You 8 99 Lesson 86 Very often we try to get more position than the shot will allow. It is vital we recognize when we are tempted to do this. In this shot we would love to end up above the nine ball. But it is too risky. Not only do we need to recognize that we cannot do something, we also need to recognize what we can do. We can build the skills to bring the cue ball directly beneath the nine for an easy winning shot. Master the speed of this shot. You must be comfortable with the speed. Practice will help you. Sometimes we have to take our own medicine. The position is what it is and we can’t do much better than cinch the shot and play for a tough shot. We do not want to miss before we get a shot at the winning ball. Let’s lose the game on the money ball rather than to lose it before the money ball. Take your medicine and shoot the tough one when it comes up. Thought for the day “I automatically look for the natural shot.” 160
  • Four!!! 8 99 Lesson 87 We cannot slow roll this shot for position on the nine ball. Far better to go four rails. Be sure to hesitate on your back stroke and use a slightly above center hit. You will need to open your angle to get a good hit on the second rail. A punch/fol- low stroke will serve you well on this shot. 8 99 99 99 99 Look at these four nine balls. If you shoot this shot as illustrated you get perfect postion on any of the nine balls. Four rails gives us a clear win­ ning shot. 161
  • The Power Glide 8 99 Lesson 88 Here is a situation where you do not have a lot of angle. You will need to power the cue ball three rails for position. Do this in several shots, cutting down the angle each time. You will be surprised by how much energy you can put on the cue ball. As the angle gets less and less, you will have to use a stun to create more energy. You will need some running english. When you come upon this shot be sure to de­ clare to ourself that this is “The Power Glide”. Vi­ sualize the ball gliding around the table for posi­ tion on the nine ball. Practice different angles so you know automatically when you have to glide around the table or use inside english and force the cue ball into position. Thought for the day “I control my life by controlling my time.” 162
  • Sight the Rail Illustration 2 Illustration 1 Lesson 89 There is great value in this shot. You will be sighting into the rail. Don’t look at the object ball. Sight the cue ball into the space where you will cut the object ball across the table into the corner pocket. Your target however, is the rail. Keep your eye on the exact spot where the cue ball will hit. This will give you the desired cut shot. When we look at the object ball we end up hitting it thick, pushing it into the rail and hanging it in the corner pocket for our opponent. Likewise with shot num­ ber two. Sight in straight. Look past the ball to the rail and deliver a pure stroke. Thought for the day “I share my experience with a friend.” 163
  • Jacking Up Lesson 90 You must be able to shoot this shot. Often times it is the difference between winning and losing. I want you to have it. Jack up your cue and shoot down on the cue ball. Pretend you are shooting a jump shot. Snap the cue and draw the cue ball back to the circle. Be sure to have a slight angle on your shot. Out in Las Vegas I used this shot to gain po­ sition on the winning ball. My opponent thought I would end up going too far. Improve your skills with this material. The Monk Billiard Academy is going to have an army of shooters out there in three years. Thought for the day “I master all The Monk’s shots.” 164
  • Skill Level 8 99 Lesson 91 As you can see, the side pocket is not avail­ able. Neither is the corner. I do not want you us­ ing inside english if it is not necessary. Here we are playing for position into the far corner. It is an easy shot. We will need our skill level ability to kill this cue ball with a snip draw and bring it into position. You can do it in this situation and you will recognize this skill level shot when it comes up in another situation. There are many times when we need to use our intuition to play position for the corner pocket. We must be able to instinctually bring the cue ball to the long rail around the number two diamond and then settle in for a nice clear shot into the cor­ ner pocket. We feel the cue ball to the number two diamond and the rest is easy. This comes from our well developed instincts. We may want to consider the 2-7-2 speed here. Say it in our minds so we can prepare for the shot. To often when playing a shot like this we get lazy and end up with the cue ball freezing on the nine ball. Think it through. Follow the ten commandments. You might even consider using a little “sneaky strange” here. 165
  • Master Draw 8 99 Lesson 92 In a situation like this we are tempted to soft draw the eight for a difficult cut shot on the nine ball. Or we may elect to deliver a 2-7-2+4 stroke on the eight and go back and forth. Actually, a 2- 7-2+4 would require too much energy as the angle is not natural. If we deliver the +4 we would have to snap it off and could very well miss the shot all together. There is an easy shot here. A simple power draw. Once you hit the long rail on the other side of the table, you are headed for easy position for the nine ball. We must get close to our win­ ning shots. In order to do so we must practice get­ ting close. You do not want to deliver a power draw when the money is on the line if you have not prac­ ticed the power draw. Monk’s Note: I hated to use the 2-7-2+3 in a close game. The reason I was reluctant to use it is be­ cause I did not practice it. So I put in my time on the table and now am able to hit this shot. The pressure of the shot does not bother me. You must practice these shots. 166
  • Kill Shot Lesson 93 8 99 In this case you have an angle on the eight ball. In order to remain down table you will need to deliver a kill shot. Remember the exercise on the snip draw? You will need to use low outside english and snip the cue ball with a lot of spin. Allow the spin to throw the object ball, thereby getting a fuller hit on the object ball, thus killing the cue ball. The cue ball will go two rails and die in perfect place for an easy shot on the winning nine ball. Thought for the day “I am solid in my stance; I never waver.” 167
  • Speed, Slide, Speed 8 99 Lesson 94 There are many ways to play this shot. I want you to master a follow through draw with speed. You will need it during your career as a Monk Billiard Academy champion. The follow through draw will cause the cue ball to slide to the right just before the reverse spin takes effect. You will want this slide to get down table. The draw will then take you to the rail and perfect position on the winning nine ball. Do not give yourself a lot of angle here. Force yourself to use a follow through draw stroke. Thought for the day “I will attend a Monk Billiard Academy Clinic in my area when The Monk comes to town.” 168
  • Creative Draw 8 99 Lesson 95 Here is a snap draw. You must pop the cue ball to cover three rails for position on the nine ball in the upper corner pocket. When you are in this shot, you must feel the corner pocket position. Develop your instincts with the draw. Be sure to make the right choices. You are in training. Always in training. Do the right thing today, and it will become simple tomorrow. Thought for the day “I take responsibility for all my shots.” 169
  • Snappy Position 8 7 6 99 Lesson 96 Here is a trap all of us have fallen into. We cannot allow this to happen again. If we shoot the six ball softly in order to get a good shot on the seven ball, we end up in an awkward position to make the seven and get to the eight. There is a simple solution for you. You will use your snap back draw with center hit on the cue ball, and go three rails for shape on the seven. With the three rail shape, you are ready to pocket the seven and get to the eight. You do not want a shot on the seven, where you will be going to the bottom rail. You want to come across the table from the seven so you can win the game. Once again, it is not enough to master these shots. You must recognize them when they come up. I am happy. You are going to win a lot of games with this material. When you play position, you are always play­ ing position so you can get on the next ball, there­ fore you always consider three balls – the ball you are shooting, and the angle you want on the next ball, so you can get to the third ball. Thought for the day “My stroke causes oohs and aahs.” 170
  • Two Choices 1 2 8 99 Lesson 97 You have two methods of achieving position on the nine ball here. One, you can use your punch stroke and go directly across the table. Two, you can use the 2-7-2+3 and go to the bottom rail and then to the long rail for position. In any case you need to do what you are comfortable with. Still, you must master both techniques. I find the 2-7-2+3 works best for me. I am not going to run into the nine ball with this shot. When I come across the table I sometimes rattle the eight ball. Thought for the day “I hesitate on my back stroke every time.” 171
  • Bridgework 8 99 Lesson 98 It is not enough to just make the ball with the bridge. You must still play position. Practice the 2-7-2+2 on this shot using the bridge. Be sure to deliver the pop. You may also experiment with some 2-7-2+3’s. Try some draw shots as well. Do the 2-7-2+5. Master the use of the bridge and your winning percentage will improve. Thought for the day “I am faithful to my practice.” 172
  • Don’t Fall Short 8 7 99 Lesson 99 Here is a familiar pattern. You need to pocket the seven ball and get back for the eight. You must be sure to come back far enough. How many times have you come up short and needed to execute a thin cut on the eight and send the cue ball three rails? Too often. We need to determine on every shot what “too far” will do, and what “too short” will do. As is the case with the seven ball, “too short” leaves us in trouble. “Too far” is okay. Practice this shot until you automatically rec­ ognize when “too short” will put you in trouble. Be comfortable with getting good position on the eight ball. Do not allow yourself to lose another game by coming up “too short” on this shot. Those of you who skip over this shot will not get your diploma. Thought for the day “I am faithful to my discipline that there are no easy shots in this game.” 173
  • Impossible!!! 8 Lesson 100 Set yourself up with a backwards cut shot. Make sure it is one you think is almost impos­ sible. Use low outside english, spin the ball with a draw stroke, and watch the object ball fall into the corner pocket. This is an advanced shot. You will need to master it. It will win many games for you. Work on the spin-draw-backwards-cut until you understand how much you can cut a ball. Try to get beyond what you think is possible. The draw is the key to this shot. Do not slap at the cue ball. Thought for the day “I share a smile and make a friend.” 174
  • The Walker 8 99 Lesson 101 Here you have a straight in shot on the eight ball. But you will need to get position on the nine for the winning shot. Make up your mind that you will be willing to follow the object ball into the side pocket. You will use a force follow stroke, with high left english. Deliver the stroke to follow the eight ball into the pocket. The high left will not allow the scratch. You will bounce to the left and run to the rail and drift to perfect position on the nine ball. Thought for the day “My trust skills serve me well.” 175
  • The Walker (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 102 This is the same type of shot. You will need to focus on following this eight ball into the corner pocket. Deliver a force follow stroke, with high right english. The right english will enable you to avoid the scratch. Be committed to your stroke on the cue ball. You can actually shoot this shot when you have a slight angle going the other way on the eight ball. Try it. You’ll like it. When this shot comes up, or the Lesson 101 shot comes up, you must recognize them for what they are. When you can see the shot, you can vi­ sualize Lessons 101 and 102 and call upon your training for success. This is why it is so important for you to master every single lesson in this book. When you do, all the shots are familiar to you. You can name them and call upon your experi­ ence. This will reduce your anxiety over the shot. You have effectively reduced the interferences and allowed yourself to deliver a one hundred percent pure stroke. 176
  • Same Stroke for Different Folks 8 99 Lesson 103 Here are three familiar shots. Each will require the same snappy stroke. Be sure to succeed with each one. Note how similar the delivery is. Snap the cue ball and enjoy the position. You will get into this situation many times in your career. Do not skip over this lesson. Each shot is important. Thought for the day “My practice is the finals.” 177
  • Same Stroke for Different Folks (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 104 Does this look familiar? It is the 2-7-2+4. Re­ member to deliver a nice “crack” to your stroke. No holding back. Your position on the winning nine ball is automatic. All you need to do is de­ liver the proper 2-7-2+4 stroke. Thought for the day “I value winning.” 178
  • Same Stroke for Different Folks (cont.) 8 99 Lesson 105 Snap the cue ball and enjoy the position. Fa­ vor outside english. Do not use too much left as it will kill speed. A crisp punch stroke will serve you well.You will get into this situation many times in your career. Do not skip over this lesson. Each shot is important. Thought for the day “I Came To Win.” 179
  • +5 Extended 8 7 99 Lesson 106 You will need to extend the 2-7-2+5 for posi­ tion on the eight ball under the nine. Snap draw the cue ball with extreme force and use the rail to gain position. Once again, you will sharpen your instincts with this shot. You will be building your skills. Remember, think 2-7-2+5 and triple the speed. Thought for the day “I deserve to win.” 180
  • Slow Rollin’ With Speed 8 7 99 Lesson 107 Here is a shot we see many times when our opponent has hung a ball. We are not ready to shoot. But here it is. An easy shot to win. If we are Monk Billiard Academy players we know there are no easy shots in this game. We take every shot seriously. And this one has some problems built in. First of all, it is difficult to deliver a winning shot when you were not prepared to shoot. So you must take your time. Here you deliver a slow roller with a thin cut to control your speed. A thin cut does not interfere with the natural speed of the cue ball. You must have good position on the eight ball if you hope to finish the winning nine ball. Practice this until you can feel the speed. Commit yourself to a thin hit on the seven, so you can con­ trol your speed for the eight ball. Thought for the day “My game is a picture of my unlimited skills.” 181
  • Spin Softly, Darling 8 799 Lesson 108 You must be committed to position on this shot if you are ever to end up with a good shot on the nine ball. Here you have a slight angle going the other way on the seven ball. Use high right with your finest spin stroke and catch the long rail with enough spin to reduce your angle on the eight ball. You do not want to go up and down on the eight. A spin stroke will set you up for the winning shot. Any time you end up with an up and down on the eight ball, consider it a failure. Thought for the day “My position is only good when I make the shot.” 182
  • Don’t Cross My Path position space 8 99 Lesson 109 There are times when we have several options. There is more than one way to get favorable posi­ tion. But it is not a matter of personal choice. We have heard the phrase, “Every player sees things differently.” That is not such a good idea. We see things based upon our knowledge at the time. But as we travel along this journey, our knowledge in­ creases. And this lesson gives us a chance to in­ grain certain principals regarding position play. Perhaps you would choose to punch the ball and follow the solid line to position. If you’ve chosen the punch path, you have gone too far on many occasions and ended up playing the nine in the same corner. As you can see, your position space is very limited. You are crossing your position space. If you choose a 2-7-2+3 path, along the dotted line, you will see your space is limitless. If you go to far, you still have a good shot. This shot should be your model from now on. Thought for the day “I am faithful to my practice.” 183
  • Shock Effect 8 7 6 99 Lesson 110 The six ball is in line with the number seven diamond on the short rail. The cue ball is in be­ tween the six and seven diamond. There is only one shot here and it is not that hard. You will cut the object ball into the side pocket and go on to win the game. Your opponent is left in shock. Don’t pass this shot by. Master it. You will win a game with this shot. Granted this may be a low percentage shot. However, we remind ourselves that “We Came To Win” and it is this concept that enables us to be aggressive and set the tone for a winning perfor­ mance. If we back off now, we may not be able to turn it on later. You will never win any games play­ ing defense. At some point you will need to play offense. And the nature of your efforts are what sets the tone. When you steal a game such as this, you create more value to what you are doing. With the “Shock Effect”, you are showing your oppo­ nent what a “Ripper” is all about. If you do not have a copy of my book I Came To Win, order it today. 184
  • Attack the Problem 8 7 6 99 Lesson 111 Here is a pattern that causes the death of many pool players. Some try to slow roll the six for po­ sition on the seven in the corner pocket. Often, they end up with a tough cut with no chance to control the cue ball. The right shot here is to set up for the seven in the side pocket. And the eight could hook you. But we will attack the possible trouble by going right at the eight. If we hit the eight, we are still in good shape. This calls for a simple punch stroke. Visualize the natural track line. It takes you directly at the eight ball. We are highly trained in the delivery of a punch stroke. Punch the cue ball with a slight below center hit and get ready for an easy side pocket on the seven. You will have control of your finish. Do not skip over this shot. And remember the lesson here. We do not avoid trouble, we attack it. We are in con­ trol. Thought for the day “I never get hooked behind balls.” (stop laughing) 185
  • Be Particular 8 99 Lesson 112 This may seem like a rather routine shot, but I want you to recognize an innocent trap. Observe the line from the ball to the rail. If you try to nurse the cue ball along that line and stop short, you will have no shot on the nine ball. When this situ­ ation comes up, be sure to snap the cue ball to the rail and back out. If the cue ball leaves the rail, you are in great shape. In addition – and this will save your life – you always want an angle on this shot. Never, never, never play for straight in. If it is not the last shot on the table, you will need an angle to move the cue ball to another position. This seems innocent, but we must be aware of the po­ tential danger involved. You have a slight angle going the wrong way. What do you do to get the cue ball coming straight back? Of course, you deliver a snap-back draw stroke. Thought for the day “I am rock solid in my stance, I do not sway.” 186
  • Road Kill 8 99 Lesson 113 I call this shot “Road Kill” because I had it in Las Vegas. I needed to draw the cue ball away from the nine, but not down table where I would have no shot. A snip draw would work, but I could not cue the ball in the low right position necessary for the shot. Here I needed to stun the cue ball back­ wards with a snap thud/skid stroke and slide to­ wards the object ball, picking up backward spin just before making contact. Not an easy shot. But it’s nice when you know how to do it. Jack up the cue and act like you are going to deliver a jump shot. Snap through the cue ball in a soft quick manner, skidding the cue ball across the table. You snap it, but not hard. Think “stun backwards”. You will be working on this one for a while. Thought for the day “I enjoy learning the game.” 187
  • Let Nature Take It’s Course 8 7 99 Lesson 114 Now is a nice time to deliver 2-7-2+4. Once you hit the long rail, you are in perfect line for the eight ball in the corner pocket. This is not an au­ tomatic shot. You control the cue ball. While you are at it, the shot you end up with on the eight ball is a seldom practiced shot by anyone other than a Monk Billiard Academy player. You and I know we must master the long straight shot into the cor­ ner pocket if we are to take our rightful place in the billiards hall of fame. We must practice our straight in shot even when we are not straight in. Thought for the day “When you shoot, shoot; don’t wobble.” 188
  • Notes 189
  • Notes 190
  • 191 Section Three A Dynamic Workout
  • 192
  • Know When X X X X 8 99 Lesson 115 Place the cue ball in each of the X positions and determine when you need to go up and down for position. Develop a personal instinct for how much of an angle you can have and still kill the cue ball and how much of an angle forces you to go up and down. Take some time to master this concept. You should never get into a situation where you are not sure. So often, when this situa­ tion comes up, we are not sure whether to slow roll it or go one rail or two rails. This indecision cost us our shot. Know when to go one rail or two rails. Do not pass over this lesson. It is vital for a champion to understand his limits. Note the dif­ ference between the one rail stroke and the two rail stroke. This is why we must not be caught in between. Thought for the day “I never shoot before I am ready.” 193
  • Two Rail Speed 8 99 Lesson 116 It is always good to work on your speed con­ trol. It does not come easy. In this shot, you will need to go two rails, back and forth for position on the winning shot. Most of these exercises look easy. They are not dramatic. There is no deep se­ cret held by the masters. Becoming a great player takes a lot of patience, working on the little things. This two rail shape shot will win you more games than a throw combination carom. Be comfortable with this kind of speed and we will meet in the finals. Once you master the simple stuff, you be­ come the master. For a long time I wondered why I won so many games against players who were as good as me if not better. Why was I the one who was coming out on top? It was in the little things I did on my practice table. Working on these subtle things gave me skills that were not obvious when I was shoot­ ing. But they became apparent in my victories. Thought for the day “Be faithful to yourself.” 194
  • Back and Forth 8 99 Lesson 117 I include this in The Lesson because we have lost too many games by trying to go one rail on this shot. First of all, we should avoid slow rollin a cut shot like this. It is to easy to push the shot. In addition, we are coming across the seam between the slates. If they are not perfect, and many are not, there will be a little roll here. Far better to use a stun/punch with a slightly above center hit and move the cue ball three rails. This allows you to strike the cue ball with confidence. It takes away the push. Once you come off the second rail, your position is guaranteed. Be sure to master this shot. Learn to recognize it. You will be smiling in the winners circle where you belong. Thought for the day “I use all the Monk’s tools to win.” 195
  • Nice Touch Lesson 118 8 7 6 99 This is a very difficult shot. I have never seen it in any book before. As you can see, you must pocket the six and go back and forth for the seven. If you use an above center hit to go forward, you will end up on the lower side of the seven. Still, you need to go forward to miss the eight ball. So you will need a center hit with soft stun on the cue ball. This way you get a direct track line to the second rail, and a forward one for position on the seven. It is all in the stroke. When you master this lesson, you will increase your skill for other shots. Don’t pass this by. I am pulling for you all the way. Let’s meet in the finals with this skill. Thought for the day “I am a Monk Master.” 196
  • The Fearsome Foursome 8 99 Lesson 119 Here you will be going four rails, back and fourth for position on the nine. There is a trick to going four rails. Line it up. Sight it. And deliver your break shot. The force will take you four rails every time. Snap the cue ball as if you are break­ ing the rack. Be committed. Visualize the rack. Thought for the day “I trust my stroke.” 197
  • Around The Horn 8 99 Lesson 120 “Around the Horn”. Set this two shot pattern up and master it. Master the ability to see the shot when it comes up. You will be glad you did. Too often we try to baby the eight ball for two-rail shape. You stand to “push” the eight ball thick when you try to be soft. It can be done, but you will need to adjust for the “push”. By going four rails, you have the freedom to shoot this shot and your guaranteed good position. Be sure your stance is rock solid. You will need a pure hit on the cue ball to achieve the four rail distance. Your stance should be solid, balanced and comfortable. Your cue needs to be level. Get close to the cue ball. Grip loose, wrist straight up and down, and let the results be just that. The sound of your stroke is very important. It should sound like the “cracker”. Be committed to this shot. Thought for the day “I depend on a rock solid stance.” 198
  • Inside The Horn 8 99 Lesson 121 Here you will use a little inside english to go up and down for an easy shot on the nine ball. Once again, it is of low percentage to try to shoot this shot softly. The “push” effects makes it un­ predictable. The inside english tends to bounce the cue ball once it makes contact with the eight ball. You need to flick your wrist to compensate for the bounce, and make an adjustment for the speed. Remember, when we use inside english, we affect the speed once the cue ball contacts the short rail. I include these “horn” shots because they will cost you games if you do not master them. And I don’t want that on my shoulders. Thought for the day “I always have a level cue when I shoot.” 199
  • Stay Alert Lesson 122 8 7 6 99 Every one of these dynamic workouts are vi­ tal to your game. You must first learn to recognize the problem. Then develop the ability to overcome them. In order to succeed with lesson number 122, you will need to go two rails with the six ball. The location of the nine ball will force you to use a great stroke. You will need the ability to deliver a crisp punch stroke with one half cue tip above center to bring the cue ball two rails underneath the nine ball. You must visualize exactly what you want the cue ball to do. See the line. If you are not at the star, you will have a difficult time running this table. Make up your mind to succeed with this workout. Thought for the day “Perseverance gets me everywhere.” 200
  • Get Past The Trouble 8 6 7 99 Lesson 123 In a situation like this many players will draw the cue ball back for a shot in the side pocket. A smart idea if you go two rails. The two rail posi­ tion zone is wider than a simple draw to the seven ball. Remember, you will need to get to the eight ball after pocketing the seven. So you must get the proper position from the six ball. Since these situations seldom come up, we fail to recognize the trap when it appears. After our failure we pass it off as poor execution. We don’t learn the inner dynamics of good position play. I have seen players like yourself lose because you drew back and froze on the seven ball. It has been my honor to watch you play for many years. This dynamic workout is the answer to your problems with runouts. You can count on me. I will not let you down. “May all the rolls go your way,” in addition to,“May you always do the right thing.” Thought for the day “Be faithful to yourself.” 201
  • The Monk’s Famous 14 Ball Exercise 7 Lesson 124 This workout is not for the perfectionist. It is difficult to succeed with this workout. You begin by using the thirteen balls as the cue ball and shoot the number one ball into the corner pocket. Your “cue” ball then becomes your object ball. Use one of the remaining balls in the pattern to pocket that object ball. You must strive to keep your “cue” ball in the zone. This exercise leaves you a lot of long tough slow rollers. You will be amazed by what you can do with these shots. The Monk’s Famous 14 Ball Exercise will help you increase your skills in all parts of this wonderful game. I have succeeded with this exercise many times. Still, my success ratio is around twenty percent. I am happy because by doing it, I strengthen my will skills and shotmaking. Thought for the day “I work for every shot.” 202
  • Embrace the Law of Least Effort I embrace the law of least effort. With freedom, I deliver the winning stroke on each of the four­ teen shots. Freedom from expectations, freedom from fear. I accept things as they are; there­ fore, I have no resistance cluttering up my mind. This is the law of least effort. Nature never tries to do anything. Look at the bird, it does not try to fly, it flies. Look at the dandelion, it does not try to grow, it grows. 203
  • Four Ball Force Follow Lesson 125 By now you are familiar with my four ball exercise. You saw a great demonstration of it in my video, The Monk 101. In this four ball exer­ cise, you will be using your force follow stroke to take the cue ball to the bottom rail and back out on each shot. See if you can complete the four balls without a miss. This four ball force follow exercise is a great tool for warming up before a tournament. It gets you loose. Warm up by yourself to develop a good rhythm and stroke. Let the hectic environment fil­ ter into your immune system until you are unaware of movement. Familiarize yourself with the sights, smells and sounds of the place. Get a good rhythm, stroke, and turn in a fine performance. The force follow is a great stroke developer. You will be glad you used this exercise. Thought for the day “I love competition. I welcome it.” 204
  • The Foursome (1) X 8 99 Lesson 126 This series of four shots is a great test of your skill. Each shot demands an ability you should have developed by now. You will be calling on your control of stroke to succeed with “The Foursome”. It takes a few moments for me to reach this level of execution, but when I do I can deliver each of the shots in sequence several times over. Shot number one is a full table kill shot. When I am shooting this shot well, I am in tune with the “crack” sound of my stroke. I snap the cue ball, impart spin, and kill the speed when I reach the object ball. As you can see, you are playing for position on the nine ball in the opposite corner pocket. Thought for the day “The nine ball doesn’t know it is the nine ball.” 205
  • The Foursome (2) X 8 99 Lesson 127 You will be leaving the kill shot (snip draw), and using a punch stroke to bring the cue ball across the table for position on the object ball in the same corner pocket. The trick here is the hit on the cue ball. You do not want to scratch in the side pocket. A pure punch stroke will do that. So you will need to pinpoint exactly where to hit the cue ball to bring the line directly across the table. Develop an understanding between the different strokes on shot one and shot two. Since it is all in the stroke, all you need to do is decide what stroke you are using and use your trust skills. Let go. Deliver the stroke and the cue ball will do its job. Thought for the day “I win with grace, I lose with grace.” 206
  • The Foursome (3) X 8 99 Lesson 128 This is my favorite shot. Look familiar? It’s the 2-7-2+3. You will be using a force follow, with inside english to achieve position to pocket the ball in the same pocket. Once again, you are let­ ting the stroke do the work. “The Foursome” gives you a perfect illustration of how the strokes work with each shot. I know you will work hard on this exercise. Sometimes I get a partner and we do it together. He/she shoots from one end while I shoot from the other. We compete. You cannot move on until you have completed the shot you are on. It is a lot of fun and helps to develop your skills. Thought for the day “I do not bother myself with limits.” 207
  • The Foursome (4) X 8 99 Lesson 129 Here we are extending the line to play posi­ tion for a ball at our end of the tale. Once again, you are building your skills, especially your abil­ ity to control the speed of the cue ball. This is important. To be able to feel the speed of this shot is mastery of the game. “The Foursome” will do wonders for your stroke. Time after time you will be faced with the need to be able to deliver this series of shots. Take the time to master them. You and I will be glad you did. Thought for the day “My follow through is precise.” 208
  • The Foursome (4) Remember, you have an intention.You are filled with intention. Intention cannot exist without desire. Recognize this truth and you will work with each lesson. The intention and desire will carry you through the tough times.Your nervous system knows of this desire. If we are not free, our nervous system cannot serve us. Remember, we need to be free. Then our intention and de­ sire can have their way. This is the groundwork for the effortless flow of our potential. 209
  • 210
  • Mid-Term Exam Lesson 130 It is now time to check our progress. We know what we want, we take the action to achieve it, and we measure our progress along the way. The Mid-Term Exam is just such a tool for measuring your progress with The Lesson. Break a rack of nine ball, using your finest break stroke. Note the level of your break stroke on a scale from one to ten. On each of your nine ball breaks, be sure to focus on the head ball and deliver a direct hit. Don’t settle for just smashing the racks open. Break as if you are on the hill with your opponent. In practice work as hard as we do in a real game. After the break, take the two low­ est balls off the table and begin with ball in hand. Here is how you score the inning. a. run out with ball in hand equals 1 point b. your first run out gives you the opportunity to break and run a second rack. c. a run out in the second rack gives you a total of 4 points in that inning. 211
  • Mid-Term Exam (cont.) If you make the nine ball on the break, you get 1 point. You may spot it and take two ball off the table and begin your run out. In this case, if you run the second rack you will be getting a total of 5 points for that inning. You also have the option of a “declare” if you break the balls, make a ball on the break, and have a clear shot on the one ball. You can then say, “I declare,” if you make a ball on the first break in the inning. You cannot “declare” on the second break. You get 1 point extra for a successful “de­ clare”. You must then attempt to run the rack with­ out removing the two lowest balls, and without taking ball in hand. We play five innings. If you shoot a perfect score, with one “declare” your total would be 21 points. If you were perfect, with a “declare” and a 9 ball break, your score would be 22 points. I have designed this work out to test your pat­ tern skills. You will also test your break. You will also test your will skills. The point system adds pressure to the test. You will be tested on how you view each inning. You must play five innings. If you fail on the first four, note how hard you work on the final inning. You must develop the skills to work hard on each and every inning regardless of the score. Sometimes, when we know we cannot post a good score, we give up. I don’t want you to do that. If you fail early, be sure to finish strong. Test your will skills. If you pass, you strengthen them for the future. On each and every shot, you are giving one hundred percent. You are focused and ready to succeed. 8 to 12 points is a C 13 to 15 points is a B 16 or better is an A 212
  • Mid-Term Exam (cont.) If you are passing the Mid Term Exam at the A level, you are a first class shooter. You have the skills of a master. I am proud of you. Test yourself to see if you can shoot one ball at a time. When you have the score in your mind, you have left the professional zone and entered the amateur zone. Shoot without thinking. It is very difficult in the Mid Term Exam. But you are al­ ways working on your professional skills. The Mid Term Exam is merely a measurement of your progress. It does not tell you who you are. Know what you want. Take action and measure your progress. Do this with the Mid Term Exam. 213
  • The Three Options 1 2 3 8 99 Lesson 131 Shoot this shot three ways, First, use a power follow stroke and go around the nine ball. You will need to strike high on the cue ball to go forward, and use right to length out the angle to go around the nine. In the second consideration, use your best punch stroke, sort of like a 2-7-2+4, and go to the bottom rail and back out for a shot on the nine. You will be familiar with the sound of this shot: a crack! And in the third shot, use a power draw and race to the long rail for a good shot on the nine. In all cases, the nine will be pocketed in the same corner pocket. Be sure to master the ability to fol­ low these three options. You will need this skill, especially in the game of nine ball. “The Three Options” are fun to work with. Thought for the day “I control my shots by controlling my strokes.” 214
  • Be Particular 8 7 99 Lesson 132 Here is a great pattern. You will win many more games with this skill. The ability to see the entire shot is paramount to winning. In this case, you need to pocket the seven and recognize that you need an angle on the eight ball if you are to get to the nine ball. The seven is the last half of a 2-7- 2+3. Get to the center of the table. The eight ball is a 2-7-2+1. You can see how valuable it is to look at the entire shot. I will be with you when you reach the winners circle. Thought for the day “I always think things through.” 215
  • Play To Your Strength 8 7 99 Lesson 133 I include these relatively simple exercises here because I have seen, time and time again, players fail to win the games they were supposed to. Each of these exercises will answer questions you may not have the experience to ask. For instance, in this pattern the layout is simple. Pocket three balls and you win. Far better to think it all the way through and play for a familiar shot. After pocket­ ing the seven, end up with a 2-7-2+2 on the eight ball. You may wonder why not play for a 2-7-2+1 on the eight ball? Your position zone for a 2-7- 2+1 shot would be too close to the eight ball. If you were off an inch or more, you would lose the shot. Playing 2-7-2+2 gives you a bigger zone. A comprehensive understanding of the 2-7-2+5 pro­ gram will improve your runout percentage. Thought for the day “I believe in The Monk’s work.” 216
  • A Snap Decision 9 8 9 Lesson 134 So often we blow this shot. Our stroke is rather tentative and we end up with a difficult side pocket shot on the winning ball. We think the cue ball will come back. But our stroke did not have enough “snap” in it. When the cue ball ends up in a for­ eign place, we are confused during the next shot. This adds to our reasons for failure. Be sure to recognize this situation when it comes up. You must snap the cue ball to the long rail, near the side pocket. Be committed to the “snap”. You may think about scratching in the side pocket. Be sure to deliver the winning stroke. Don’t take it lightly. Not long ago I attended a big league event in Maine as a guest of “The Skillful Vending Com­ pany”. Ross Furman invited me up for the eight ball tournaments. I had attended this event ten years prior and they wanted me back for this spe­ cial occasion. Ray and Lyne Coate do a fine job putting this all together. In that tournament, I saw time and time again players losing games because they did not recognize the Snap Decision. I want you to win the next game you play that calls for a Snap Decision. 217
  • The First Shot Is The Key 8 7 6 99 Lesson 135 The first shot in almost every attempted runout is the key to your success. It is nice to know what it takes to get desired position. In a case such as this, we end up with a punch slide on the seven ball. So we will need to use our 2-7-2+2 knowl­ edge and extend the angle off the bottom rail to reach the number three diamond and come out for our slide shot on the seven. As you can see, a natu­ ral 2-7-2+2 will bring us to the number two dia­ mond. This will not work. So we extend the line with english. You can do it. On the seven, we use our punch slide skills to slide over for an easy shot on the eight. Be sure to leave a slight angle so you can use a 2-7-2+1 stroke for perfect position on the nine ball. Caution: Do not think the slide shot on the seven is easy. Thought for the day “I share my experience with others.” 218
  • I See, Therefore I Win A B X 8 7 99 99 Lesson 136 Here is another very important workout. I of­ fer these lessons because I have seen too many players lose from this very layout. First, you must have the skills to pull it off. Second, you must be able to recognize the situation when it comes up. Playing position for nine ball A you will shoot a 2-7-2+2 on the seven and bring the cue ball to the place marked X. You are skilled in this fine art so you have no reason to be anxious over your success. You are simply shooting Lesson 36. Playing position for nine ball B you will shoot a 2-7-2+2 and extend the line all the way to the number two diamond and down table for an easy shot on the eight ball. From here you will be able to drift down table for the nine. Thought for the day “My love for this game shows in my dedication.” 219
  • Be Free – 2 X 8 99 Lesson 137 Often times we try to kill the eight ball and shoot the nine ball into side pocket marked X. We need to be free on the pressure shots. Shoot the eight ball with a punch stroke and slide to posi­ tion on the center of the table. Far better to be free than to try anything complicated like a spin kill shot. I include this workout here so you will rec­ ognize this situation when it comes up. “Be Free” is the cousin to going two rails instead of trying to hold up the cue ball. Don’t fight the cue ball. Go with the flow. Let it go where it wants to go. Thought for the day “My stroke is smooth, straight and solid.” 220
  • A Spot Check A BC D 8 7 6 99 5 Lesson 138 I will give you a hint. Each shot must be shot correctly or you will have a tough time at the fin­ ish line. If you are having trouble, you may call me for help. Do not shoot the 7 in the corner pocket, A. We seek the uncertainty of a match. In all matches, there is uncertainty. This is our desire, to enter the world of uncertainty. Therefore, we are detached from the results. We are players in the game. The results are just that. In our de­ tachment, we are free to perform.We have inten­ tion, but we are not attached to the results. Thought for the day “Success is mine.” 221
  • Speed Control 8 7 99 Lesson 139 This is a rewarding workout. Shoot the seven, go to the long rail with straight high english, and get good position on the eight. Be sure to use a nice “click” follow stroke. Shoot the eight ball, and go to the bottom rail so you will have good position on the nine ball. You will face this chal­ lenge to your skills many times during your ca­ reer. Be sure to set this up and do it. You will be amazed by how difficult it is. You will get feed­ back to your speed skills. This information is vi­ tal to your development. Thought for the day “I am graceful in winning and graceful in losing.” 222
  • Having Fun with 2-7-2+1 123456 Lesson 140 The one, two and three balls are 2-7-2+1’s. You must end up with a straight in shot on the four ball so you can use your 2-7-2+5 stroke. Then you will be ready to finish up with two more 2-7-2+1’s. One day, after a lesson with an advanced stu­ dent, I set up this exercise. She was having coffee and I was restless. I delivered three perfect 2-7- 2+1 strokes and ended up with the 2-7-2+5. I suc­ ceeded with that and finished the workout with two 2-7-2+1’s. She was inspired and wanted to try it for herself. After one hour working on this lay­ out, she gave up without success. I offered it to another student who had difficulty with it. Another time, in Seattle, I offered this pattern to the class and I could not succeed with it. We need to check our skills from time to time. When you master the 2-7-2+5 program, you will be able to succeed with this lesson. It is great to work on. Don’t pass it over. Thought for the day “I never get discouraged.” 223
  • Knowing Your Lines 8 7 99 6 Lesson 141 Here is a nice pattern to work with. You will need your best 2-7-2+5 stroke on the six ball. Be sure to leave an angle on the seven so you can use your 2-7-2+1 to get across the table for a straight in shot on the eight ball. Then you will use your snap back draw stroke for an easy shot on the nine ball. This exercise will improve your game. I have found, time and time again, a situation like this, ending a winning streak. If you are to be a great player, you must be great with simple layouts. “Knowing Your Lines” will help you reach the fi­ nals where I am waiting for you. Work hard. I am not going to wait very long. Thought for the day “I go down into my stance when I am ready to shoot.” 224
  • I Have Just Been Killed 8 99 Lesson 142 This is a killer pattern. You are on the rail, with a long shot on the eight ball. The nine is just above the side pocket. If you shoot the eight ball with too much speed you will end up with a scratch shot on the nine. By slow rolling it, you stand a better chance to miss the eight ball. A 2-7-2+3 is not possible because you are on the rail. Your left english will not take. This is tough. I include it here because you need this skill. Work on this pat­ tern. Find the answer for yourself. I slow roll it and take a tough shot on the nine. There are times when I play safe. I bunt the eight ball three rails to the other side of the table. Recognize when you are in a tough situation. It is not always possible to run out, even though you have a shot in front of you. Thought for the day “My grip is firm, but loose.” 225
  • Look Familiar? 87 6 99 5 Lesson 143 You may look at this as the “Four Ball Exer­ cise” but it is not. The difference here is the de­ mand on your position play. The key ball in this run is the six ball. After you pocket the five ball with your finest punch stroke, you need to be far enough out for a 2-7-2+1. If you come up short, and end up with a 2-7-2+2, you will be flirting with a possible block from the nine ball to the seven ball. A 2-7-2+1 will allow you to simply come across the table for a 2-7-2+1 on the seven, ending up with a 2-7-2+1 on the eight, ending up with a winning shot on the nine. These patterns show you how important it is to be precise in our position. You have been trained by the finest in­ structor in the country. You are a Monk Billiard Academy student and all the material you need is right here. When you have mastered every lesson, contact me for a final exam and further instruc­ tion. You are ready to become a Monk Billiard Academy advanced degree instructor. You are ready to help others with this difficult game. Thought for the day “My mind is quiet when I am ready to shoot the shot.” 226
  • The Pattern From Hell 8 76 99 1 5 3 2 4 Lesson 144 One of my advanced students called this “The Pattern From Hell”. It is. The object is to run this rack of nine ball without allowing the cue ball to touch another ball. I have done it many times. And each time my technique is different. Therefore, I have no concrete instructions to give you. It will take all your skill. That is what you want to dis­ play from time to time anyway. So, good luck. It takes concentration, perseverance and a little luck. Thought for the day “Where did The Monk come up with this stuff?” 227
  • 2-7-2+2 With Purpose Lesson 145 Here you are learning to control your track line off the 2-7-2+2 shot. You need to extend to get a straight in shot on each of the object balls. This is fun to work with. It checks your 2-7-2+2 control. Place one object ball at a time. We will be going back to the 2-7-2 and the +5 shots many times during our journey. The 2-7-2+5 is the backbone of our game. This is our personal ritual. We need to think about our game and begin an action. Once we spring into action, we develop a habit. Habit builds character, and character gives us our destiny. Get the 2-7-2 series into your ha­ bitual ritual and you will become a fine, fine player. When I enter the tournament I step into the field of uncertainty. When I do that, I step into the world of all possibilities. This is where the fun, magic and joy come in. Thought for the day “I love this material.” 228
  • 2-7-2+3 With Purpose 2 3 4 2 13 Lesson 146 We begin this pattern with a 2-7-2+3. This shot calls for a little more punch in our stroke. We want to tighten the track line into the corner and come up for a nice 2-7-2+3 on the two ball. Once again we need to call upon our skills. By this time in our journey, we should have the skills to succeed with this very difficult pattern. Now we deliver a bril­ liant “Killing Me Softly” on the three ball, and allow ourselves to come up short so we can play a nice shot on the four ball. Thought for the day “I am always ready to take my turn at the table.” 229
  • Notes 230
  • Notes 231
  • Notes 232
  • 233 Section Four Strategy Play
  • 234
  • Smart Choice 8 99 Lesson 147 Here we simply bank the eight ball up near the nine ball, and allow the cue ball to go the op­ posite rail. When the game gets to this level, you are about to enter into a safety game. Do not resist this level, do not resist this concept. Expect your opponent to answer your safety with a safety of his own. You are willing to go back and forth until you get the advantage. Often times, we think we will have a shot following our great safety. If this doesn’t happen, we are anxious to deliver the win­ ning shot. Thus we may be lured into an aggres­ sive mistake. Be patient. When you are entered into a safety game, stay with it until you get a clear advantage. Thought for the day “I will play for an advantage no matter how long it takes.” 235
  • Straight Pool Shot 8 99 Lesson 148 Once again, if we elect to bank the eight ball, we are not guaranteed a shot on the nine. Why risk a tough shot, to gain an even tougher one? Here is a fine opportunity to play a great safety. Develop the ability to cut the eight ball up table, but not as far as the side pocket. And bring the cue ball back near the corner pocket. It would be tough to answer your safety. When you set up these lessons, take the time to look at them. Enter them into your pool com­ puter. This way, when you are faced with a diffi­ cult situation, you will know what to do. When you play a safety shot do not think de­ fense. Do not get into a defensive mode. Look at the safety you want to play and decide that this is a winning shot. It is a shot that will gain you the advantage. You are trying to win the game. Take the time to see the entire shot from beginning to end. Never shoot a safety because you are afraid of a shot. If there is a shot on the table, take it. Go for it. You came to win. Thought for the day “I play for myself. I do not play for anyone else. Therefore, if I am a slow player, I will remain a slow player. If I am a fast player, I will remain a fast player. I play at my own speed, for myself.” 236
  • The Grady Crunch 899 Lesson 149 Here is a shot Grady Mathews taught me. You will not make a lot of money with combinations. Especially if you have to cut the first ball. This puts english on the ball, which in turn puts more english on the second ball, which spins it, squirts it, pushes it, throws it, and usually hangs it in the corner pocket where spin squirt, push and throw have no effect. We should avoid combinations. Here is a good safety if you can pull it off. Bank the eight ball to the bottom rail. Use a follow stroke to spin the cue ball up to the nine. Before you shoot this shot, take the cue ball and place it against the nine ball. Put the eight on the bottom rail. See how this safety works? You have given your opponent no shot when you can get the cue ball against the nine, Now that you understand the shot, you are well on your way to mastering it. By the way, when you see Grady, tell him thanks. And you might consider buying his fine videos which have helped many players. Thought for the day “I never forget a lesson.” 237
  • Hide and Go-Seek 899 Lesson 150 We could cut the eight ball across the rail, but the position on the nine ball would not be guaran­ teed. Remember, we do not take a hard shot when we are not promised a reward. A good safety on the eight ball will win us many games. And we have one here. Bank the eight to the long rail, and down to the short rail. Leave the cue ball behind the nine. A full table kick shot is difficult. Espe­ cially when the game is on the line. Do not settle for reading this lesson. Practice it until you are the master. It is not enough to be able to hit the shot. You must recognize it when it comes up. Thought for the day “My journey in this game is my reward.” 238
  • Our First Safety 899 Lesson 151 This is the first safety we learn. Use your punch stroke on the eight ball and stop the cue ball right there. The eight will go four rails and down the other end. This will leave your oppo­ nent a tough kick. Be sure of what you want to do here. If you are not center ball on the cue ball, it will drift right or left and leak out for a shot. If you overstroke the punch stroke, you may draw the cue ball back out. A pure Monk Billiard Acad­ emy punch stoke will do the job. You are the mas­ ter of this shot. Thought for the day “My confidence comes from within.” 239
  • Separation Stress 8 99 Lesson 152 Once again, we do not bank a ball when our position is in doubt. Here is a fine opportunity to separate the balls. Send the cue ball to the bottom rail at the other end of the table, while the eight ball goes under the nine ball. You will be using a little spin on the cue ball. The spin will carry you to the end of the table. This way, you can focus on the speed to bring the eight behind the nine ball. In all safety shots, we have a focus. One element is most important. Getting the cue ball to the bot­ tom rail will be our primary focus for this shot. If your attention is divided between two balls, you may not succeed with either one of them. There­ fore, we need to be clear about what we want to achieve. Thought for the day “I am not divided on my purpose.” 240
  • One Mission At A Time 8 99 Lesson 153 The bank shot is out. We are going to play safe. Since we are below the eight ball, we will have a difficult time. This time we will bank the eight ball up table. But our primary purpose will be to place the cue ball behind the nine ball. You will be leaving your opponent a difficult shot and putting the wining percentages in your corner. A spin stroke will help you accomplish your mission. Re­ member, focus on one aspect of your goal. Once I was in a match where my opponent held a comfortable lead. I was feeling the stress of losing. I knew I could do only one thing to get back into this match. “When I get back to the table,” I told myself, “I will not let him have an­ other easy out. I will take over and make it tough for him.” I switched to a conservation mode. If he is to win, he will have to earn it. Having a plan gave me confidence. Confidence improved my performance. I was able to close the gap. The tough shots I was leaving him began to take a toll on his game. It was not long before we were hill and hill and I was able to rip the match away from him. 241
  • Nudge Me Gently 8 99 Lesson 154 Here is a skill that will serve you for years to come. The ability to run the cue ball up to the nine and send the eight to the bottom rail will come in handy. We avoid combinations, especially when we have a lock up safety. Use your follow stroke and focus on the cue ball. Be sure however, you get the eight ball to the rail. If you are frozen to the nine, your opponent has no shot. If you are behind the nine ball, your opponent is still in trouble. Just as we avoid com­ bination and bank shots, we would hate to make a living with kick shots. Leave those for your oppo­ nent. This safety comes up in the game of Eight Ball as well. Thought for the day “I do not make a judgement on my performance.” 242
  • A Tough Call 8 99 Lesson 155 This is one of the toughest safeties in the game. A full table thin hit on the object ball is always a hard shot. But it is one we need to master. And it will take time for you to master this wonderful shot. A weapon like this is not for the faint of heart. This shot calls for a thin hit. And our focus should be on the cue ball. Thin hit the eight with spin, go three rails with the cue ball, and end up behind the nine. If you thin hit the eight ball, you will leave the eight ball on the bottom rail. This is a good safety in itself. If your cue ball settles be­ hind the nine ball, you are in great shape. Don’t pass this lesson by. You will use this technique in many ways during your career, and you will have a feeling of confidence when the shot comes up. If you fear this shot, you are not the master. Stay with it. Thought for the day “My goal is to master the game.” 243
  • Inside One Time 8 99 Lesson 156 Here we will be using inside english to take the cue ball one rail. Our goal is to bank the eight around the nine and return the cue ball to our end of the table. We do this with high, inside english. The inside english will give greater distance to the eight ball. This situation comes up a lot in nine ball with the first shot. You break the rack and end up with a tough shot on the one. “Inside One Time” can turn the advantage to you. There is no other publication that includes this series of material. We are fortunate. Each lesson gives us the upper hand. Master each one. Under­ stand how it is done. If you have problems and want to spend some time at The Monk Billiard Academy, call our office or write. Our journey knows no limits. Thought for the day “I put first things first in all my efforts.” 244
  • The Pay Off 8 99 Lesson 157 Learning to double bank a safety will pay divi­ dends in increased wins. We are not concerned with the cue ball here. The eight ball is our only consideration and we must get it to the bottom rail. This shot comes up in many variations dur­ ing the game of nine ball or eight ball. Once again, we are the type of player who makes it tough for our opponent to win. If they make a full table cut shot, bank or combination to beat me, that is fine. I do not leave them bunnies because I do not take low percentage shots. You will be tested on this shot when I come to town. Don’t be caught short­ handed, I will ask you what is the most important dynamic, and then expect you to perform. Thought for the day “Tremendous results come from little things.” 245
  • Double Double = Four Rails 9 8 Lesson 158 Here you will be running the eight ball four rails to the bottom rail. Sometimes we try to baby this shot and leave the cue ball behind the nine ball. The best choice would be to go four rails with the eight. You will leave your opponent with a dif­ ficult shot. Let’s use our best stun shot and creep the cue ball behind the nine. These safeties are not easy. If they were, your opponent would have them. They are for you. Stay with it until you mas­ ter this lesson. Thought for the day “I have committed these shots to memory. Now I commit them to my game.” 246
  • Notes 247
  • Notes 248
  • 249 Section Five Smart Play
  • 250
  • Be Conservative Lesson 159 How often have we run into this situation? And we tried to nurse the winning nine ball into the corner pocket. How many times have you scratched? How many times did you succeed with the shot? There is only one shot here, that is to bank the nine ball four rails and offer a tough bank shot to your opponent. Master it. Use a solid punch stroke, one cue tip high and bring the cue ball to the bottom rail. The nine ball will go four rails to the other short rail. How many times have you tried a very hard shot to win the game only to rattle the ball and give your opponent an easy victory? We need to offer the hard shots to our opponents. You can do this with the “Be Conservative” lesson. Thought for the day “I believe in myself, because I persevere.” 251
  • Know When To Duck Lesson 160 In league play, your winning percentage will increase if you avoid tough shots and offer them to your opponent. This bank shot is low percent­ age. If we miss, we leave it hanging in the pocket. And let’s face it, we would be lucky to make thirty percent of these bank shots. That is offering our opponent a seventy percent chance of winning. We don’t want to do that, so we bank it to the long rail, put the cue ball on the opposite rail, and offer the thirty percent bank shot to our opponent. Then we are in the seventy percent winning mode. Ex­ periment with your speed. Master this shot as it comes up many times over. We must take responsibility for our game. During the contest, we are not victims waiting to be slaughtered. Bad rolls do not control us. We are proactive and do not acknowledge bad rolls. We take responsibility for all our actions. In fact, we have the ability to choose our response. Do not become relative to the conditions of the match. Thought for the day “I give thanks that the pathway to victory is clearly marked before me.” 252
  • Play The Percentage Lesson 161 Here you will be using spin to bring the cue ball down table, and send the object ball to the bottom rail. Once again, don’t try to win the game with a low percentage bank shot. Be consistent. Be predictable. Everyone should know that you are going to play safe off this shot. Our style is to make it tough for our opponent to win. Nothing is going to come easy for him. Mas­ ter each of these safeties. They will not come to you with one practice session. Memorize them. This is your weapon. Thought for the day “During the contest, I always make the right choice.” 253
  • Play Within Yourself Lesson 162 There are times when we can make this shot. And there are times when we do not have the stroke. Here is a high percentage safety. Simply cut the nine ball thin. The cue ball returns down table, and the nine ball banks to the bottom rail. Sometimes this shot comes up as the opening shot in nine ball. Don’t be afraid to use this at any time during the game. Thought for the day “I am not preoccupied with results.” 254
  • Don’t Gamble 8 99 Lesson 163 If you were to cut this eight ball down the rail, you stand a good chance of selling out. You are not even guaranteed position on the nine ball. This would be a gamble. We don’t do that. Far better to draw the cue ball behind the nine, and two rail the eight ball to the bottom rail. These are such simple safeties that you rarely see them in books. If you master this shot, and I know you will, you will win extra games with it. Thought for the day “I am focused on all draw shots.” 255
  • Straight Pool Safety 8 99 Lesson 164 This type of safety comes up in the game of straight pool. But it works just as well in nine ball. Your job is to cut the eight ball up table, sending it near the side pocket, on the rail. The cue ball is to go to the bottom rail and up to the nine ball. The straight pool safety is worth working for. Deliver a follow stroke, with spin, and you will enjoy the results. Don’t try to bank the eight ball to win, and don’t try to cut it up table. Leave the tough shots for your opponent. Thought for the day “My practice is always honest.” 256
  • Safety First 8 99 Lesson 165 It would do no good to pocket the eight ball. You will end up with a tough bank on the nine. Never play a tough shot to end up with a tough shot. If a tough shot will give you an easy shot, we may consider it. In this case, it would be sui­ cidal to slow roll the eight ball. Our best option is to bank the eight ball into the corner pocket. The cue ball will automatically come down table for the nine ball, should we make the eight. If we fail on the eight ball, we still leave our opponent a long tough shot, to end up with an even tougher shot. This is not an easy lesson. You will have to work hard to master this lesson. If you cannot shoot the cue ball past the eight and into the corner pocket, you will get a double hit on the cue ball with the bank shot. The cue ball will go to the bottom rail and hit the eight as it returns. If you can see the corner pocket with the cue ball, you can bank the eight ball. 257
  • The Last Lesson Lesson 166 Each of these lessons is an opportunity for you to grow in this game. While they may be hard, you are blessed with the desire to improve. Use that desire to stay the course. I include these safety plays because they are a necessary part of this game. In defining our game, we encompass all aspects in both offense and defense. Yet in each endeavor we have the primary focus of our objec­ tive. We never play a two way shot. If you chase both rabbits, you will catch none. It is either a safety or a shot. This way we can put first things first and succeed with the task at hand. Do not force things. When you work hard for something, giving it all you’ve got, you sometimes fail for just that reason. You are trying too hard. How many pop ups have come from home run swings? How many duffs have come from trying to hit a three hundred yard drive? And how many times have you jumped the cue ball off the table, trying to hit the rack with all your might? In all our efforts, we are faced with uncertainty. The home run, the long drive, the nine ball break. Follow the law of de­ tachment and let it happen. You have the skills. Why would you have to try so hard? First things first. Deliver the stroke. Let the results be just that. Each match is within the field of uncertainty. You and I would love to be able to control the out­ come. We would love to be so good at this game that the end is never in doubt. Yet this is not what we really seek. For if it were, we would play those who have no chance against us. We would seek out the lesser skilled player and always know that we would win. Instead, we seek the uncertainty and desire the certain. Welcome uncertainty. That is what you want. 258
  • The Last Lesson (cont.) Enjoy it. Grounded in the field of uncertainty gives you the opportunity for greater growth. These are the ingredients of success. We are not the match. We are the participants in the match. Experience the detachments to results and you will be happy with the results. In every contest there is a lesson. This is your guarantee. I thank you for our journey. I thank you for your uniqueness. I thank you for your support to this work. May all the rolls go your way. 259
  • “The Law Of Giving” We are familiar with the words, “It is better to give than to receive.” Actually, life is a series of giving and receiving. It is a circle, which must be connected. An unending flow. If you will not give, and choose to hoard your wealth, you stop this flow, and it begins to clog. Soon you will wither and die. This law applies to the game of pocket billiards. The journey is a growth experience. We multiply our ability by sharing with others. If we refuse to give to others, we stop the accumulation of our growth. Our game begins to clog, becomes stagnant. We don’t want that. In every seed there is a promise of a forest. If we hold on to that seed, we will get nothing. Only by giving do we receive. Anything that is worth while in life is multiplied when you share it with others. With The Lesson you have received a gift. The door has been open to a new and wonderful game. You have grown. You have matured. You are on the threshold of greatness. It is time to keep the circulation flowing. It is time to connect the circle. We can do that together. You and I will make an­ other player very happy with our gift. Spend some time helping a friend master the four strokes of pool. Teach him/her the snip draw. Teach the 2-7- 2 program to someone who needs your help. Ev­ ery time you lend a helping hand you will experi­ ence growth. I hope you will order my other books. You will enjoy each one and gain something out of what I teach. Thousands of happy pool players every­ where have worked hard on the lessons I write about. I am humbled by how much good this has done for my fellow players. Thanks for traveling this journey with me. I wish you all the best. The Monk 260
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  • ORDER FORM You can order additional copies of this book directly from the pub­ lisher. The Lesson makes a wonderful gift. Share the insights and information provided in this book with friends and playing partners in your league. Please mail me ________ copies of The Lesson at the special price of $39.95 each. I’ve enclosed a check or money order made payable to Samsara Publishing in the amount of $39.95 (+$3.00 shipping and handling). Name: _______________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________ City, State, Zip: ________________________________________ Phone: _______________________________________________ E-Mail: ______________________________________________ I’m interested in receiving more information about a personal appearance by The Monk. Please contact me at the address above. Mail order form with check or money order to: Samsara Publishing, Post Office Box 365, Orange, MA 01364 263
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